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Author: NechesInvst Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 2839  
Subject: 1 Gallon batches Date: 5/6/2012 9:42 PM
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As summer comes upon us, I'm looking at moving away from 5-gallon batches, it's just too hard to cool the wort down when it's 95 outside; and move toward 1 gallon batches.

I know I can easily scale back the amount of grain used, as well as the hops. My question is on the yeast.

Is there a place where I can buy small amounts of yeast for 1-gallon batches, or do I need to just not use a whole tube?

Mike
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Author: jamesmw Three stars, 500 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 2659 of 2839
Subject: Re: 1 Gallon batches Date: 5/6/2012 11:01 PM
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couple things you can do
Save the yeast http://www.mikebeer.net/reuseyeast.htm
Use dry yeast

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Author: VitaBevis Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 2660 of 2839
Subject: Re: 1 Gallon batches Date: 5/7/2012 9:06 AM
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no offense, but that's a terrible ideaL: making beer's already time-intensive enough. better to improve your cooling techniques. someone--psuengineer, maybe--recently suggested something i've been meaning to try. he freezes gallons of clean water in vessels that allow the whole thing to be removed like a big ice cube. he adds one or two of these to his wort and has it cooled down fast. I put my kettle in a tub of cold water for a half hour, swirling the water every five minutes or so, and then I pour in a couple gallons of nearly-frozen water (I put gallon jugs in the freezer when I start brewing). If the wort's about 3 gallons at the end, this gets me down under 80. If it's more like 4 gallons, my method doesn't quite do it and I have to have more tub-time.

I beseech you, in the name of your inexorably dwindling time on this earth, not to continue on your planned path.

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Author: PSUEngineer Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Top Recommended Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 2661 of 2839
Subject: Re: 1 Gallon batches Date: 5/7/2012 9:43 AM
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no offense, but that's a terrible ideaL: making beer's already time-intensive enough. better to improve your cooling techniques. someone--psuengineer, maybe--recently suggested something i've been meaning to try. he freezes gallons of clean water in vessels that allow the whole thing to be removed like a big ice cube. he adds one or two of these to his wort and has it cooled down fast. I put my kettle in a tub of cold water for a half hour, swirling the water every five minutes or so, and then I pour in a couple gallons of nearly-frozen water (I put gallon jugs in the freezer when I start brewing). If the wort's about 3 gallons at the end, this gets me down under 80. If it's more like 4 gallons, my method doesn't quite do it and I have to have more tub-time.

Yes, I suggested it. It isn't quite one gallon chunks of ice. I freeze several quart sized containers of water. I sanitize the plastic containers and added boiled water to it to freeze. When the wort is done heating, I add the ice chunks. I think it does two things. By cooling fast, the aroma hops added near the end of the boil retain their aroma. Also there is a good cold break at the end that lets the proteins settle out. My beers are never cloudy. I don't know if there is any detrimental effect by doing this.

To lower the temperature of beer fermenting in a glass carboy, you could try the wet t-shirt trick. You put the carboy in a tub of water. You put a t-shirt over the carboy with the shirt tail touching the water. Water will wick up the t-shirt and evaporate as it does which causes a cooling effect. I have never done this method. I read it in a book. I don't need to since I have a spare bathroom that gets cold from the AC when the door is closed.

PSU

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Author: BobbysPapa Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 2662 of 2839
Subject: Re: 1 Gallon batches Date: 5/7/2012 5:02 PM
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I just pop on over to the convenience store, conveniently located across the street, and buy about 30 lbs. of ice and ice the whole wort down in a keg tub. It takes about 30 minutes to chill it down to pitching temp. Of course, not everyone has a ready source of ice across the street......


Mike in NJ

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Author: pcwa Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 2663 of 2839
Subject: Re: 1 Gallon batches Date: 5/7/2012 8:32 PM
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I freeze 1 gallon milk jugs in my "other" freezer (read kegerator in garage) and on brewing day, I run a recirculating pump (I got it at a garden store, for a small fountain, it cost 10$?) through my copper wort chiller. I fill my kitchen sink with water and ice and run the water through the chiller and recirculate it. I can cool 5 gallons in 20 minutes to pitching temp.

I'm not sure that's described well...

I bought 20 feet of copper tubing at Lowes or Home Depot and coiled it. I put rubber tubing on both ends. The inlet end has a submergible circulating fountain pump, and that is in the sink with ice water. The outlet end dumps back into the sink. I set it up this way to use less water.

hope that idea helps. I agree, 1 gallon batches seem like a waste of time and effort :)

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Author: BobbysPapa Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 2664 of 2839
Subject: Re: 1 Gallon batches Date: 5/7/2012 9:22 PM
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I bought 20 feet of copper tubing at Lowes or Home Depot and coiled it.


How did you coil it without kinking it up?


Mike in NJ

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Author: PSUEngineer Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Top Recommended Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 2666 of 2839
Subject: Re: 1 Gallon batches Date: 5/7/2012 9:52 PM
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How did you coil it without kinking it up?

You bend the copper tubing around a cylindrical object that is smaller than your brewpot. It can be a smaller pot or keg.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G8EolKTDZUQ&feature=relat...

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Author: jamesmw Three stars, 500 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 2667 of 2839
Subject: Re: 1 Gallon batches Date: 5/7/2012 9:56 PM
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I know lots of brewers that brew 1 gallon batches when they are playing around with recipes.You can mash in a pot thats in the oven set for your mash temps.To limit your volumes because of fermenting temps. seems like a waste of time.Pick up an old fridge and set it up to ferment in

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Author: pcwa Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 2668 of 2839
Subject: Re: 1 Gallon batches Date: 5/7/2012 10:46 PM
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How did you coil it without kinking it up?

I wrapped it around my 2 gallon pot!
pcwa

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Author: NechesInvst Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 2670 of 2839
Subject: Re: 1 Gallon batches Date: 5/7/2012 10:50 PM
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As so often, I didn't really 'splain myself.

I'm really just looking at trying small batches of various types and styles. I have NO interest in brewing up 5, 1-gallon batches.

This past Saturday we brewed up 30 gallons of brew--this should hold me (pretty much) through the summer.

Since I'm just starting out on creating my own recipes, I don't want to be tied down to 5-gallon of something that I wound up screwing up.

We have toyed with the idea of cooling various ways--but haven't decided or created anything yet. Still knocking around ideas. My mechanical engineer buddy wants a plate chiller.

Mike

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Author: pcwa Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 2671 of 2839
Subject: Re: 1 Gallon batches Date: 5/7/2012 11:11 PM
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I brewed a few 1 gallon batches in big glass apple juice containers once. But it was too much work to only get one gallon, and honestly, I never made a batch I didn't like. :)

If you get screw cap bottles, you can fill them, plunk them in a bucket or sink and cool them with ice water. Or run the recirculating chiller through the 1 gallon wort. I have a 1.5-2 gallon brewpot as well as my 7.5 gallon one, and I used to chill that in my sink with ice and water but if I were to use it again I would make another smaller chiller.

pcwa

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Author: RIKris Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 2672 of 2839
Subject: Re: 1 Gallon batches Date: 5/8/2012 2:10 PM
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In regards to chilling the boiled wort, there are a million ways. As several have suggested use either a plate or coiled copper chiller. If your tap water isn't very cold, you can pre-chill the water with another a second smaller copper coil in a bucket of ice water. You'd basically end up with: hose - small copper coil in a bucket of ice water - hose - large copper coil in boiling pot - hose for discarded water.

If you're going to use the same strain of yeast again soon, i would make a yeast started to build them up and then split the yeast cake into several mason jars or flasks. This would basically be similar to the method the recycling yeast from the bottom of your fermentation vessel. If you like dry yeasts, it's even easier just use a small portion of the package and save the rest for later.

I also have to agree with what others have said and mention that brewing is a lot of work for 1 gallon batches. Most people try to figure out how to make more at once not less. I brew 10 gallon batches, but also like variety, so i split the wort into two separate fermentation vessels. This allows me to experiment with different yeast strains and dry hopping methods. You could split into as many 1 gallons jugs as you want.

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