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4 Years no budget from Senate ...

This brings up a somewhat minor but interesting fact

Of the 100 Senators in Congress, 33 have never had the honor of voting for a budget

Now "that" is a government shutdown

Bears
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4 Years no budget from Senate ...


You’re really gonna call the House Budget anything other than a sham.It cuts veterans programs by 24% (from a guy who’s never served his country, or even been in a combat zone) cuts pell grants and overall education funding by 30%
meanwhile it increases military spending by 500 billion dollars
And Medicare? yeah, you get $6000 a year to go find your own private healthcare insurance, except there hasn’t been private insurance for people over 65 for the last 50 years (i’m not talking about private medicare add-on insurance)

The whole point of a house bill is to negotiate something that will pass senate. negotiate ? Remember that word?
Congress doesn't use much anymore
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Read it all.



Several media outlets are reporting that the GOP Budget cuts funding for veterans. These same outlets charge that the GOP budget doesn’t even mention the word “veterans.” Both charges are wrong.

These reports stem from a misreading of the GOP Budget and by comparing the CBO scoring of the GOP Budget and the President’s Budget, with that of OMB’s score of the President’s Budget. Using CBO scoring for both budgets, the GOP Budget exceeds the funding levels for veterans over the next 10 year as compared to the President’s budget (see chart below).

Learn more about funding veterans programs from the House Budget Committee.

The Facts

FACT: The GOP Budget Keeps Discretionary Spending for Veterans Exactly the Same as Proposed By President Obama: $61.342 Billion. Using CBO numbers (which, by law, every Congressional budget resolution must use), the GOP budget assumes discretionary spending (i.e., VA medical care, construction, claims processing and national cemetery administration, etc.) on veterans in FY 2013 at exactly the amount requested in the President’s Budget. In both budgets, this translates to a 4.3% increase above the FY 2012 funding level for VA, as recommended in the House Committee on Veterans’ Affairs’ bipartisan Views and Estimates letter.

FACT: The GOP Budget Fully Funds VA Entitlement Programs in FY 2013 and Beyond. Again, using CBO numbers, the GOP budget fully funds VA entitlement programs (i.e., disability compensation, pension, GI Bill, etc.) this year and beyond. The only difference between the GOP Budget and the President’s Budget under mandatory spending is the exclusion of the President’s $1 billion Veterans Jobs Corps proposal, on which the Administration has yet to produce any details. The exclusion of the Veterans Jobs Corps in FY 2013 spending is supported by all 11 House Committee on Veterans’ Affairs’ Democrats and Senator Patty Murray of the Senate Committee on Veterans' Affairs (see SVAC V&E letter).

FACT: The Word “Veterans” Appears 41 Times in the GOP Budget. FY 2014 advanced appropriations for veterans’ medical care is dictated by Section 501(c) of the GOP budget resolution, which permits advance appropriation not exceeding $54.462 Billion “for the following programs in the Department of Veterans Affairs – (A) Medical Services; (B) Medical Support and Compliance; and (C) Medical Facilities accounts of the Veterans Health Administration.” The word “veterans” clearly appears in the GOP Budget.

http://veterans.house.gov/budget
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The whole point of a house bill is to negotiate something that will pass senate. negotiate ? Remember that word?
Congress doesn't use much anymore


Woah ... 2010

Obama wrote his budget

The Budget Committee did a mark-up and sends the budget out of committee. The Democrats (the majority in both house and senate) chooses to not offered its own plan on the Senate floor.

End of 2010 ... dead


2011

Budget Committee, Chairman Conrad (D) delays the release of his Senate budget for FY 2012

The Republican-controlled House passes its budget for FY 2012

Senate majority Leader Reid says it would be “foolish” for Senate Democrats to offer a budget.

Chairman Conrad (D) cancels his committee mark-up, saying he will not release a budget to the public

The Senate rejects President Obama’s FY 2012 budget 0-97.

2012

Chairman Conrad (D) states he will hold a budget mark-up in his committee. Couple days later, Majority Leader Reid (D) declares that the Senate would not consider a budget for the third straight year.

The Republican-led House passes a budget for FY 2013.

Chairman Conrad (D) cancels the scheduled Budget Committee mark-up for the second year in a row

2013

The House passed the Republicans 2014 budget

The Senate voted to reject the House approved budget

Yesterday, Senate passes first budget in 4 years.

Obama in all of this? He failed to even meet the deadline to present a budget."

Your Medicare comment

The house bill does change Medicare for people aged 55 and younger, They would go on to a voucher system that can use to purchase private insurance or traditional Medicare.

Never drink the KoolAid unless you look at what is in the bottom of the cup first.

Bears
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The house bill does change Medicare for people aged 55 and younger, They would go on to a voucher system that can use to purchase private insurance or traditional Medicare.




Traditional Medicare?

Really how is it traditional? Under Ryan’s plan Medicare would no longer make payments to health care providers such as doctors and hospitals after 2024,when the voucher system starts.
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Really how is it traditional? Under Ryan’s plan Medicare would no longer make payments to health care providers such as doctors and hospitals after 2024,when the voucher system starts.

That's because Ryan is using private insurance companies and Medicare advantage to make the payments and those who go with the private plan, then like in Obamacare, the government will pay the private insurance companies who then pay the doctors +.

It doesn't matter much. Ryancare, Obamacare, Medicare .... none of them can work financially. They are all pipedreams, colorful election campaign tools that the next few administrations can stumble over

I will be enrolled in the existing system and I tell my kids they are screwed


Bears
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Ryan is using private insurance companies and Medicare advantage to make the payments and those who go with the private plan,


Exactly, It is Clearly NOT Traditional Medicare
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"Exactly, It is Clearly NOT Traditional Medicare "

Traditional Medicare is unsustainable. You know what that means, don't you?
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Exactly, It is Clearly NOT Traditional Medicare

Did anyone ever say it was?

Everyone acts like Medicare is something that will supplement all the pipe dream programs. Obamacare taps Medicare for what? Some $500 billion? Ryan changes the system in some way .....

The fact is, the trust for Medicare "A" (hospital payments) runs out of money in 11 years. "B" and "D" are solvent for the moment due to a different funding method than "A"

Bottom line, none of the plans can work.

The little that has been released on Obamacare shows increased taxes that are not enough to fund the system which is by design going to provide lesser coverage than many of the middle class chose to carry now.

Obamacare policies are mainly going to be high deductible catastrophic policies ... meaning the first .... $2500, $5000 will need to be out of pocket.

Fine that it helps those with less to afford the policy, but if a family living on $50,000 can now have a policy for a small amount ..... it is of no use to go see a doctor or get basic treatment .... you must pay down that deductable, and if you had no extra money before Obamacare ..... why would you have any more after Obamacare?

So, you ignore the symptoms and dont go to the doctor and if it gets worse, you go to the ER where they cant refuse you (what the program was expected to prevent .... same as "saving each family $2500. Thats history ... the Pre existing program shut down already, it blew through it's 5 Billion dollar start up budget in a couple months .... now they say there is not enough money to set up all the exchanges .... all that needs to go back to Congress for more money from a broke country.

The mess just keeps getting bigger. Right now, depending what part of the country you live in, 20-33% of doctors will not accept Medicare as payment. You pay the full payment up front, they will file the claim for you, and you wait until Medicare sends you a check for whatever percent of the original charge they choose to pay. Saw a sign saying the same thing at my cardiologist. My blood lab requires they have a credit card on file before they do any bloodwork,

We are in it deep.

Bears
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Exactly, It is Clearly NOT Traditional Medicare

Did anyone ever say it was?
bears



Yeah, you did,you even went out of your way to put it in Bold Letters to make the point:
http://boards.fool.com/the-whole-point-of-a-house-bill-is-to...




The fact is, the trust for Medicare "A" (hospital payments) runs out of money in 11 years. "B" and "D" are solvent for the moment due to a different funding method than "A"

Bottom line, none of the plans can work.


And pushing everyone into a thousand fractionated private insurance plans will end the large market clout of Medicare. Medicare is the only payor to consistently secure the lowest reimbursement rates with health care providers. Medicare operates under minimal administrative overhead. Just use the example of one procedure, CT w/ contrast. Medicare has kept reimbursement increases to less than 2% a year, but hospitals have been driving these costs at 12% a year to non-contractual payers.
The only area where Medicare rates have been bloating is through Medicare Advantage, which is what Medicare will become: medicare dollars going to pay private insurance claims.

The last time someone tried to privatize a large government industry, was when Pete Wilson (also a republican) turn the utility industry over to private companies, in fact, hundreds of private companies. And what happened? Enron.

Right now, depending what part of the country you live in, 20-33% of doctors will not accept Medicare as payment.

That's a complete fabrication. If you take out all the doctors that can't charge medicare in the forst place i.e., plastic surgeons etc... 98% of physicians are compliant with medicare. I've posted link after link that provides evidence of medicare doctors in the U.S. in the past. If you're mixing in Medicaid/Medicare doctors with doctors that are compliant with the Medicare system, then you are looking a the wrong set.
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That's a complete fabrication. If you take out all the doctors that can't charge medicare in the forst place i.e., plastic surgeons etc... 98% of physicians are compliant with medicare. ......

You should do some research before finding yourself standing in front of a doctors office with overflowing bucket of Obamacare and Medicare that nobody is willing to accep


A new government study finds one-third of doctors do not accept new Medicaid patients. Most of the doctors cited low reimbursement as the reason, according to The Wall Street Journal.

The study of 4,326 doctors found while 31 percent were not taking new Medicaid patients, 18 percent were not taking new patients with private insurance, and 17 percent were not taking new Medicare patients.

The researchers at the National Center for Health Statistics reported in the journal Health Affairs that they found a wide variation among states. For example, almost 60 percent of doctors in New Jersey said they would not accept new Medicaid patients, while almost all doctors in Wyoming did accept them. Doctors in metropolitan areas and smaller practices were less likely to take new Medicaid patients.


http://www.drugfree.org/uncategorized/one-third-of-doctors-d...


The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission, an independent federal panel, said that 29 percent of Medicare beneficiaries who were looking for a primary care doctor had a problem finding one. In the 2008 HSC national survey, more than 20 percent of primary care doctors refused to see all new Medicare patients (only 4.5 percent refused all new privately insured patients); about 40 percent of primary care doctors and 20 percent of specialists refused most new Medicare patients.

The problem of physician access is about to increase dramatically. By 2019, Medicare payments become even lower than Medicaid. According to the Medicare Trustees, Medicare payment reductions under the new law will cause hospitals, nursing facilities, and home health agencies to operate at a loss – 15 percent lose money by 2019, 25 percent by 2030, and 40 percent by 2050. The Trustees Report openly acknowledged the obvious – these health care facilities “would have to withdraw from serving Medicare beneficiaries, or shift substantial portions of Medicare costs to their non-Medicare, non-Medicaid payers.” The bottom line is insurance without access to medical care is an illusion, and that is exactly what is in store for Medicare patients.


http://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2013/03/11/america...


Voters and our politicians seem to be unaware that a significant proportion of doctors already do not accept Medicare patients, primarily because of inadequate payment for services, and that number is increasing. The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission, an independent federal panel, said that 29 percent of Medicare beneficiaries who were looking for a primary care doctor had a problem finding one. In the 2008 HSC national survey, more than 20 percent of primary care doctors refused to see all new Medicare patients (only 4.5 percent refused all new privately insured patients); about 40 percent of primary care doctors and 20 percent of specialists refused most new Medicare patients.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/scottatlas/2013/03/10/with-bette...

An increasing number of doctors are opting out of the Medicare system, including many of the specialists, internists, and integrative physicians who handle thyroid, hormonal, fatigue, and immune system problems. In fact, many of these doctors don't accept Medicare, and also do not participate in any private insurance programs at all. Their patients need to pay out of pocket, up front, and file themselves to get whatever reimbursement is available under their coverage.

http://thyroid.about.com/b/2010/04/24/doctors-accept-medicar...

Medicare is a form of insurance. Doctors have the option to accept an insurance plan or not. Many doctors opt not to take Medicare insurance because of the perceived low payments and hassles they receive for their services. Many doctors feel that the government has dropped the payment amounts for services to such a low rate that they cannot provide these same services without going broke. There is much debating going on between hospitals, private doctors and the Medicare system to come up with a more fair and justified payment plan.

http://www.seniorcorps.org/medicare/why-dont-all-doctors-hav...

Bears
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An increasing number of doctors are opting out of the Medicare system


The fact is over 93% of physicians participate in Medicare, maybe it used to be 99%.


96.4% of physicians and other practitioners in Alabama participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
87.2% of physicians and other practitioners in Alaska participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
91.1% of physicians and other practitioners in Arizona participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
95.9% of physicians and other practitioners in Arkansas participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
89.5% of physicians and other practitioners in California participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
90% of physicians and other practitioners in Colorado participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
93.4% of physicians and other practitioners in Connecticut participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
92.4% of physicians and other practitioners in Delaware participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
91.3% of physicians and other practitioners in District of Columbia participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
92.5% of physicians and other practitioners in Florida participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
90.4% of physicians and other practitioners in Georgia participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
94.7% of physicians and other practitioners in Hawaii participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
84% of physicians and other practitioners in Idaho participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
93.4% of physicians and other practitioners in Illinois participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
87.4% of physicians and other practitioners in Indiana participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
94.6% of physicians and other practitioners in Iowa participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
95.4% of physicians and other practitioners in Kansas participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
94% of physicians and other practitioners in Kentucky participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
92.4% of physicians and other practitioners in Louisiana participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
94.8% of physicians and other practitioners in Maine participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
94.3% of physicians and other practitioners in Maryland participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
96% of physicians and other practitioners in Massachusetts participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
97.3% of physicians and other practitioners in Michigan participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
80.6% of physicians and other practitioners in Minnesota participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
86.1% of physicians and other practitioners in Mississippi participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
94% of physicians and other practitioners in Missouri participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
90.9% of physicians and other practitioners in Montana participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
94.6% of physicians and other practitioners in Nebraska participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
95.6% of physicians and other practitioners in Nevada participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
94% of physicians and other practitioners in New Hampshire participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
88.9% of physicians and other practitioners in New Jersey participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
93.3% of physicians and other practitioners in New Mexico participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
82.3% of physicians and other practitioners in New York participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
91.9% of physicians and other practitioners in North Carolina participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
97.3% of physicians and other practitioners in North Dakota participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
95.7% of physicians and other practitioners in Ohio participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
94.4% of physicians and other practitioners in Oklahoma participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
93.4% of physicians and other practitioners in Oregon participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
96.4% of physicians and other practitioners in Pennsylvania participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
77.2% of physicians and other practitioners in Rhode Island participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
92.8% of physicians and other practitioners in South Carolina participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
90.6% of physicians and other practitioners in South Dakota participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
92.6% of physicians and other practitioners in Tennessee participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
89.4% of physicians and other practitioners in Texas participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
97% of physicians and other practitioners in Utah participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
93.8% of physicians and other practitioners in Vermont participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
93.7% of physicians and other practitioners in Virginia participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
95.8% of physicians and other practitioners in Washington participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
94.8% of physicians and other practitioners in West Virginia participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
95% of physicians and other practitioners in Wisconsin participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)
99% of physicians and other practitioners in Wyoming participate in Medicare Part B (Medicare Part B Participating Physicians and Other Practitioners by State, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services)


http://www.rightdiagnosis.com/doctors/medicare-doctor-and-ph...

http://facts.kff.org/chart.aspx?cb=58&sctn=163&ch=17...
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You should do some research before finding yourself standing in front of a doctors office with overflowing bucket of Obamacare and Medicare that nobody is willing to accept...




You know I've had this argument over and over in the past with conservatives, all these scare tactics. If it's not WMD, or the boogyman dictator, it's the collapse of society the end of virginity... on and on.

If you're in Miami Beach here's a list of GPs
move the cursor on the map and you'll discover about 20 that can see you this week...


http://www.zocdoc.com/family-physicians/55102-mn-230088pm/me...

General Practitioners are truly hard to find. Nowadays you are better off finding a Nurse Practitioner.

Medicare provides you with an online healthcare provider: Here's 30 pages of nurse practitioners on Miami Beach that take Medicare.

http://www.medicare.gov/find-a-doctor/provider-results.aspx?...

Give me your zip code and I'll find you an appointment within five weeks.
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"Nowadays you are better off finding a Nurse Practitioner.
"

Yep, the quality of care is sinking to new levels.
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Easy answer there, but the subject is the percent of physicians who have chosen to not accept or limit Medicare patients, not "where can I find a nurse practitioner"

The bottom base line is, the payments from Medicare are not enough to allow many physicians to continue to accept Medicare. They will take payment up front and submit for you, then you get the fractional payment from medicare.

Obamacare will be the same

Medicare and Obamacare will be voluntary for physicians and the rich will get the better coverage and the poor will sit in long line clinics that will forced on us under Obamcare.

Bears
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[Nowadays you are better off finding a Nurse Practitioner.]


"Yep, the quality of care is sinking to new levels."


Ignorance is not always bliss.
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Easy answer there, but the subject is the percent of physicians who have chosen to not accept or limit Medicare patients, not "where can I find a nurse practitioner"


I also gave you a list of 20 or 30 GPs in Miami Beach that accept Medicare, but it is true, GPs are becoming a thing of the past.

the subject is the percent of physicians who have chosen to not accept or limit Medicare patients:

I gave you a list and a map, state by state: the average number of physicians that do not participate in Medicare B is 7% depending on the state.

The bottom base line is, the payments from Medicare are not enough to allow many physicians to continue to accept Medicare. They will take payment up front and submit for you, then you get the fractional payment from medicare.

That is illegal. You can not create separate charges one for a patient and a different charge for Medicare. It shows that you don't know what you're talking about. This practice is common with dentists. It's illegal for healthcare providers.
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I dont know if I would trust your site to much

The first on provides no source of data or year it represents ..... sometimes called referencing a "pig in a poke"

Your second site showing "Medicare Chartbook, Fourth edition, 2010"

SHows it's source as "Source:Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Data Compendium, December 2009."

Go to that site and you find http://www.cms.gov/Research-Statistics-Data-and-Systems/Rese...

Which state exactly what I have been posting

At today?s levels, Medicaid payment rates have already contributed to well-documented problems with access to physician services. For example, a 2006 survey by the Center for Studying Health System Change found that 14.6 percent of physicians had no Medicaid patients and that 21.0 percent were not accepting new Medicaid patients. (By comparison, only 4 percent of physicians were not accepting new privately insured patients.) Anecdotal evidence also suggests access problems for other services, including hospital emergency rooms. The simulation ignores the temporary increase in Medicaid payment rates for primary care providers in 2013-2014.

And for cripes sakes ... that quote is based on 2006 and we know costs have gone up and medicare payments down since then .... the obvious conclusion is that the map chart your post shows has some kind of "if, maybe, only, in the opinion of or using this data only" in the formula used to get the numbers .... that is very obvious.

Massaged data produces any results you want

A sign on your cardiologist reception desk saying "we no longer accept Medicare Payments" is about as solid data you can find.

Bears
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That is illegal. You can not create separate charges one for a patient and a different charge for Medicare. It shows that you don't know what you're talking about. This practice is common with dentists. It's illegal for healthcare providers.

Posting that " It shows that you don't know what you're talking about." is rather rude and would be kin to me calling you an idiot .... not nice ... considering your post is wrong

Go to the medicare site

Doctors have three choices to sign up for

Oh heck you most likely will not check, so here


The Three Options

There are basically three Medicare contractual options for physicians. Physicians may sign a participating (PAR) agreement and accept Medicare's allowed charge as payment in full for all of their Medicare patients. They may elect to be a non-PAR physician, which permits them to make assignment decisions on a case-by-case basis and to bill patients for more than the Medicare allowance for unassigned claims. Or they may become a private contracting physician, agreeing to bill patients directly and forego any payments from Medicare to their patients or themselves.


http://www.aafp.org/online/en/home/practicemgt/mcareoptions....

So a non-PAR physician can charge about anything he wants ... accept the Medicare ... or refuse it and charge whatever they want, take medicare (or have the Medicare payment sent to the patient so the physician does not have to wait), and bill the patient for his full rate up front.

Bears
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"Ignorance is not always bliss."

Something you will become quite clear about in the future with Obamacare.
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Something you will become quite clear about in the future with Obamacare.


ok, maybe so, but Nurse Practitioners have been providing healthcare for forty years.

So what does that have to do with Obamacare?
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So a non-PAR physician can charge about anything he wants ... accept the Medicare ...



Keep Reading...


if your doctor, provider, or supplier accepts assignment:
Your out-of-pocket costs may be less.
They agree to charge you only the Medicare deductible andcoinsurance amount and usually wait for Medicare to pay its share before asking you to pay your share.
They have to submit your claim directly to Medicare and can't charge you for submitting the claim.


OR

if your doctor, provider, or supplier doesn't accept assignment:

They can charge you more than the Medicare-approved amount, but there's a limit called "the limiting charge." The provider can only charge you up to 15% over the amount that non-participating providers are paid. Non-participating providers are paid 95% of the fee schedule amount.


Besides:

I already gave you a state by state list that documents that 93% of physicians accept assignment...
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At today?s levels, Medicaid payment rates have already contributed to well-documented problems with access to physician services. For example, a 2006 survey by the Center for Studying Health System Change found that 14.6 percent of physicians had no Medicaid patients and that 21.0 percent were not accepting new Medicaid patients. (By comparison, only 4 percent of physicians were not accepting new privately insured patients.) Anecdotal evidence also suggests access problems for other services, including hospital emergency rooms. The simulation ignores the temporary increase in Medicaid payment rates for primary care providers in 2013-2014.


Look, Bears, I’m done with this silly argument, believe what you want. In my very first post I pointed out that Medicare patients are a completely different set from Medicaid patients:
http://boards.fool.com/exactly-it-is-clearly-not-traditional...

You even copied and pasted from this exact comment.

Then you fabricate payment claims, and now you bring up Medicaid Patients pretending this represents Medicare. Most medicaid patients are seen by doctors who are paid by the county. Doctors that are not working for the county who accept a Medicaid patient into their service for a fee, do not get paid very much. This isn’t something new.

You’re really not interested in the facts of the matter. Your posts over many months are testament that you already believe that healthcare in this country is doomed. You already believe that most doctors don’t participate in Medicare, and it doesn’t matter what facts your presented with.
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The first on provides no source of data or year it represents ..


You just don't like to see the facts:

28 February, 2013
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"ok, maybe so, but Nurse Practitioners have been providing healthcare for forty years.

So what does that have to do with Obamacare? "

Have you heard of doctor shortages due to millions and millions of newly insured.

Long waits for Dr. appointments await you and your loved ones. Trouble finding quality doctors to care for your health issues will become more and more apparent.

Hey, you seem OK with nurse practitioners taking care your parents and loved ones, so no issue for you, hey?
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Hey, bears........Hey (heh,heh) Nemesis....


You got bigger fish to fry:

THESKYISFALLING!THESKYISFALLING!THESKYISFALLING!THESKYISFALLING!THESKYISFALLING!THESKYISFALLING!
THESKYISFALLING!THESKYISFALLING!


Aaaaaaaaaaggggghhhhh!.....We're doomed!

Take LOL Mom with you when you leave.


Jimbo

Abandon all hope....
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"THESKYISFALLING!THESKYISFALLING!THESKYISFALLING!THESKYISFALLING!THESKYISFALLING!THESKYISFALLING!
THESKYISFALLING!THESKYISFALLING!
"

If people like you continue to ignore the major issues facing this country then yes in a metaphorical sense the sky will be falling on you and your loved ones when you least expect it.

Laugh now, because your laughing will eventually change to crying, if our leaders continue to say things like we don't have debt problem or ignore seriously addressing the unsustainable entitlement programs.

Go ahead and continue laughing at your own expense.
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THESKYISFALLING!THESKYISFALLING!THESKYISFALLING!THESKYISFALLING!THESKYISFALLING!THESKYISFALLING!
THESKYISFALLING!THESKYISFALLING!
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The sky only SEEMS like it is falling because the sea levels are rising (even though the beach is in the same place it has always been).

I'm just joking around. The sky is only falling because of the draconian Republican cuts (which they haven't actually instituted (and can't)) to the level of increase in spending.

Mark

PS How much did 'reality' get when you guys got divorced? Did she get the house?
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If people like you continue to ignore the major issues facing this country then yes in a metaphorical sense the sky will be falling on you and your loved ones when you least expect it.

-Nematode


Oh such a Big Boy Now! LOL

Coming from someone that doesn’t know the difference between a Country and a Tree
Or
Someone that doesn’t know the difference between the study of Economics and PlayDough
Or
Someone that thinks Obamacare created Nurse Practitioners
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"Oh such a Big Boy Now! LOL

Coming from someone that doesn’t know the difference between a Country and a Tree
Or
Someone that doesn’t know the difference between the study of Economics and PlayDough
Or
Someone that thinks Obamacare created Nurse Practitioners "

Nonsense from a fool.
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Cypress: 25% surcharge on the rich

-Nematode



http://boards.fool.com/cypress-25-surcharge-on-the-rich-3060...

Next Year when you get to your Third Grade Spelling Book you'll get that word.
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"Next Year when you get to your Third Grade Spelling Book you'll get that word. "

And I bet you get a ton of recs for this post. ROTFLOL at the level of discourse by the libs.
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"Next Year when you get to your Third Grade Spelling Book you'll get that word. "

And I bet you get a ton of recs for this post. ROTFLOL at the level of discourse by the libs.
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I haven't looked yet but I guarantee that post gets a few recs. I saw this one lady on here get 80+ recs because she was demanding an $800/yr birth control regimen be paid for by her insurance so she could have unprotected sex with her husband.

Think about how pathetic that is. 80+ people clapping their hands for an 'adult' woman who can't come up with $800 to support her preferred sexual methods.

These people are human trash.

Mark
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Aaaaaaaaaaggggghhhhh!.....We're doomed!

Take LOL Mom with you when you leave.

Jimbo
____________________________

My, how the mighty have fallen since the old
LOOTP days...Sad.
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