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URL:  http://boards.fool.com/lti-wont-get-into-what-i-think-the-attitude-of-15122915.aspx

Subject:  Re: OT: Reparations Date:  6/6/2001  10:41 PM
Author:  uwalum Number:  41159 of 734972

<I won't get into what I think the attitude of the mostly white (I assume) posters here would be if it had been THEIR great great grandfather forced off their land like many "negroes" were forced off their 40 acres during and after Reconstruction.....

Suffice to say I don't think their attitude toward reparations would be so confidently certain that reparations are some kind of scam....>



My step father was born in 1910 in Russia which became Poland after WWI. He grew to age and moved to Germany. He was Jewish. When the holocaust began, Jews were encouraged to leave the country. Only 2 countries would take Jews, one being China. His brother with his wife and young son were hidden like Anne Frank. My stepfather went to china where my stepbrother was born (under Japanese occupation). When the communists came to power, the Jews were thrown out of the country and went primarily to Israel (where another stepsister was born). My stepfather kept in touch with his family and friends from Germany, China and Israel when he finally came to the US. I grew up with adults that had tattoos on the forearms. I grew up with the stories and the understanding of the Holocaust. Everything about my childhood was affected by the experiences of the adults around me. I am 38.

My Mom was a civilian German whose home was bombed and were relocated and starved through most of the war. Her grandmother was killed by lethal injection because she was old.

My stepfather collected his monthly check from the German government and now my Mom collects as his surviving spouse. When she dies, the reparations are over, which is perfectly fine with me.

Why is it that when the discussion of Black Americans collecting reparations always comes back to "if it were your g-g-g-g-grandfather, you'd feel differently." No I wouldn't. It isn't about black and white, the issue is about unfair treatment 150 years ago. It is not about what happened after the civil war. Only 30 years ago there was a sign on the entrance of an upscale area of Seattle which read "No dogs or Jews allowed." It wasn't nice, wasn't fair, and it wasn't where we moved.

I'm not Jewish, but I was raised by a Jew who had been there and done that and it was in his lifetime not 150 years ago. My mother has seen so much death, destruction and starvation and she only qualified for a monthly check because she married a holocaust survivor. No reparations for what she went through. It seems that the discussion is always about race.

L


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