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URL:  http://boards.fool.com/since-1991-i-have-averaged-a-little-over-14-28952739.aspx

Subject:  Re: End of Social Security Loophole Date:  12/12/2010  3:13 PM
Author:  gdett2 Number:  67854 of 76237

Since 1991, I have averaged a little over 14% annual return on my invested money, which includes 2001 and 2008/9.

This allowed me to retire 5 years ago at 55 instead of 66 or 62 even though I "gave up" 80% of my company pension and healthcare benefits to retire early. My savings have paid for everything.

The 5 years referred to was in "my" earlier post, 62 - 65 is 4 years not 5 that I had put in my post.

In the list below, I start with $18,576 that stays in my IRA instead of being withdrawn. In year 2, an additional $18,576 is put in plus gains at 8%.

I dropped all gains on the first year, so the end number is now lower even though it is currently invested and would have the full first year appreciation.

$18,576
$40,124 +
$63,396 +
$88,530 +

No additional money in from here to the end, only investment gains of 8% annually.
$95,612
$103,261
$111,522
$120,444
$130,080
$140,486
$151,725
$163,863
$176,972
$191,130
$206,420
$222,933
$240,768
$260,030
$280,832
$303,299
$327,562
$353,767
$382,069
$412,634
$445,645

This assumes:
1. I was able to live comfortable on the $18,576 + other normal sources.
2. That I actually leave the saved money invested and do not "drain" it.

If I switch from 8% to 6%, the end result is $288,321.

Incidently, in my planning, I use 6% for investment appreciation so that I plan for a pessimistic future. It was just tested in the 2008/9 sag without any problems.

Gene
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