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Subject:  Re: Cardinal Carlo Martini Date:  10/2/2012  3:15 PM
Author:  Frydaze1 Number:  183156 of 195889

I acknowledged that you believe for you, it is wrong. But when you say it is based subjectively, you acknowledge that it is a matter of opinion, and that there is no moral law that applies objectively to humans being broken when someone else rapes. They are merely breaking the law in your head.

What I'm having a hard time understanding is why you feel that the law in your head should be binding on others? What makes it better than their law?



I think it should be binding because I want it to be. I think it is better than their law because I believe it is better for society. That doesn't make me *actually* right. But *I* believe I'm right, and I'll fight pretty hard to convince others of that. If I convince enough others, it becomes the morality of that society.

Here's a simple test for you: Can someone behave immorally if they don't know what they're doing is immoral? Con someone behave morally if they don't know what they're doing is moral?

Examples:
- Person A tells person B something they believe to be true. But it isn't, actually true. Did they lie? Yes. Is that an immoral act?
- Person A accidentally and unknowingly drops a $100 bill which is found by a homeless and starving family, thereby saving their lives. Is that a moral act?
- A severely mentally disabled child walks into the bathroom and intentionally pushes a clock into the bathtub where his mother is taking a bath. He has no understanding of electricty or why it shouldn't mix with water. His mother dies from electrocution. Is that an immoral act?

I believe that those acts were neither moral nor immoral. Morality doesn't exist outside the mind of the person performing the action. Since that is the case, the morality of each act is entirely dependent on the mind (the understanding and intent) of the person committing the act. That means it is subjective, since not everybody's understanding and intent is the same even when committing the same actions.


Frydaze1
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