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URL:  http://boards.fool.com/dictionaries-and-definitions-are-based-on-how-30301101.aspx

Subject:  Re: The housing market and the candidates Date:  10/4/2012  8:50 PM
Author:  foo1bar Number:  124337 of 127550

Dictionaries and definitions are based on how terms are used, so if many people say they're the same thing, they are the same thing

*ONLY* to the ignorant


No - usage drives definitions.
When a dictionary writes/updates a word's definition it is describing how the word is used - NOT how some people think it should be used.

There are many words that have multiple definitions - some even contradictory - because that is how the words are used in real life.

An example you might be familiar with is "realtor" - it has two definitions:
www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/american/realtor


(US)
®
1> a real estate broker or appraiser who is a member of the National Association of Realtors

noun
2> ([r-]) a real estate agent


Legally it's #1 - but many people talk about any RE agent as a "realtor", whether they are a member of the NAR or not.

An example that is usually more appropriate for programmers would be definitions 3a and 3b of hacker http://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/american/hacker
(Many people who were early creators/adopters of the term in computer parlance used it in meaning 3a, and strongly disagreed with 3b being an appropriate definition - yet it has by usage become defined as 3b as well.

The term 'loan officer' describes a subset of both loan brokers and retail lenders,
I believe you meant to say a superset of ...
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