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Subject:  Re: West Is Best: Protected Lands Promote Jobs.. Date:  12/5/2012  2:41 PM
Author:  sykesix Number:  46616 of 58811

That kind of thing. Don't learn that the reason for the clear cut was that it had been taken over by a disease and they were trying to control it. Or an invasive species had taken over and they were removing it and planting the area with a variety of species.

Yeah...but those are the tiny, tiny minority of cases. The vast majority of clear cuts are because that's the cheapest way to get the timber. IIRC, most softwood are consumed by the construction industry, primarily as dimensional lumber. The rest is used for pulp.

And people wonder why rural areas tend to go Republican.

Most logging on public lands is subsidized by the federal government. Despite what you might have heard, Republicans are eager to funnel public dollars to private companies. So there is definite economic self-interest at play. Remember the Bridge to Nowhere? The purpose of the $400 million dollar bridge was to enable easy logging access from the pulp mills in Ketchican to Gravina Island. It only got derailed because it was such a blatant abuse of public money. That's just the tip of the iceberg. My solution is simple. Just end all the federal subsidies and most of these problems go away by themselves.

The price of lumber might go up, but not necessarily. For example, I mentioned a large portion of softwoods are used for dimensional lumber. However, most homes are framed improperly simply because that's how people have always done it, and lumber is cheap thanks to tax dollars driving down the price. Using advanced framing techniques reduces the amount of framing lumber by about a third, and the homes are much more energy efficient as well.


http://www.seattle.gov/housing/seagreen/TrainingMaterials/Fr...
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