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URL:  http://boards.fool.com/as-im-just-always-impressed-with-the-hubris-of-30418200.aspx

Subject:  Re: Climate Change Date:  12/6/2012  8:55 PM
Author:  lindytoes Number:  46661 of 59211

As I'm just always impressed with the hubris of human beings on the amount of control or the managing of climate.

Goofyhoofy:
And people were sure we could never pollute rivers and oceans because, well, you know, they are just so big.
........................

For some reason Goofyhoofy's comment reminded me that this year is the 50th anniversary of Silent Spring. The environmental movement will never run out of causes because as Carson said, industry spreads disinformation and public officials accept industry claims uncritically. I truly believe that is as true today as it was in the middle of the 20th century.

wikipedia:
"Silent Spring...credited with helping launch the contemporary American environmental movement.
The New Yorker started serializing Silent Spring in June 1962, and it was published in book form (with illustrations by Lois and Louis Darling) by Houghton Mifflin on Sept. 27. When the book Silent Spring was published, Rachel Carson was already a well-known writer on natural history, but had not previously been a social critic. The book was widely read—especially after its selection by the Book-of-the-Month Club and the New York Times best-seller list—and inspired widespread public concerns with pesticides and pollution of the environment. Silent Spring facilitated the ban of the pesticide DDT in 1972 in the United States.

The book documented detrimental effects of pesticides on the environment, particularly on birds. Carson accused the chemical industry of spreading disinformation, and public officials of accepting industry claims uncritically.

Silent Spring has been featured in many lists of the best nonfiction books of the twentieth century. In the Modern Library List of Best 20th-Century Nonfiction it was at #5, and it was at No.78 in the conservative National Review. Most recently, Silent Spring was named one of the 25 greatest science books of all time by the editors of Discover Magazine.
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