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URL:  http://boards.fool.com/those-simple-screws-look-incredibly-not-strong-to-30426596.aspx

Subject:  Re: more carpentry advice :-) Date:  12/11/2012  6:05 PM
Author:  foo1bar Number:  123334 of 128288

Those simple screws look incredibly not-strong to me.

Plastic anchors in the correct sized hole do pretty well at not being pulled out. They aren't something I'd use overhead for anything more than a construction paper kids project. But for what you're doing, I think they'll be more than sufficient.

Tapcons are probably as good or better than the other thing you had - the screw threads bite into the concrete, so for them to be pulled out, either the thread fails, or the concrete does. I have used tapcons for a small project (mounting safety sensor for garage door) and the only issue I had was drilling the holes (I think I hit a rock or something that didn't drill easily, but moving half-inch to the side gave me no problem - and now that I have a rotary hammer drill, I don't think I'd have a problem at all.)

Looking at the tension force on tapcons - it'd take a lot to pull them out of a cement wall:
http://www.concretescrews.com/technical-info/tapcon-concrete...


My best thought to attach the vertical "bulkheads" to the strips is something like this: http://www.carinya.com.au/plugins/carinya/images/angle_brack......

Those would work.

You had been talking about strips (one or more) along the surface of the wall, to fasten the verticals to, and to bring it out slightly because of something at the bottom I think. You could go straight through that board/plywood, and into the wall.

Also - you could use angle brackets with one leg on the wall, the other on the very top of the cabinet.

Angle brackets are probably going to be less likely to fail than the plywood you attach them to - and to get that to fail would take a lot of force. I use small angle brackets (~2" steel brackets), fastened to the top of book cases to keep them from tipping in case of an earthquake.
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