The Motley Fool Discussion Boards

Previous Page

Financial Planning / Tax Strategies

URL:  http://boards.fool.com/and-i-am-only-considering-it-at-this-point-and-30497579.aspx

Subject:  Re: Marriage Penalty Returns Date:  1/21/2013  2:09 PM
Author:  knighttof3 Number:  117476 of 121146

And I am only considering it at this point, and there are only two votes who count, both with veto privileges.

Hear, hear! Absolutely.

You do not need judgmental people suggesting that your marriage should be continued for the benefit of everyone else but your family; or you should pay more in taxes because you an afford it. Both are morally suspect arguments.

If the practical arrangements like legality of divorcing for taxes, health care power-of-attorney, estate tax, etc work out; go for it.

I have been through a somewhat similar situation and came to appreciate how hard such decisions can be. And I went the opposite way. Specifically, I was (and am) underwater in my home mortgage by a very large amount, having bought it at the exact wrong time. And until HARP 2.0 came along, the government was not willing to help honest homebuyers who had never missed a mortgage payment (but liars and/or idiots who got homes they could not afford, could easily get relief. No doubt some people got duped by unscrupulous lenders and small print, but at least in Southern California, it was clear that most homebuyers knew exactly what they were doing.) Anyway, my choice was to send keys back the bank via "jingle mail" or keep paying my mortgage because I could afford it. In the end, I weighed all pros and cons including my family's and my feelings about breaking the promise made to the bank (who obviously doesn't have emotions and would kick me out in a second if the roles were reversed) and decided to stay put in the mortgage. It literally came down to how much I valued my promise in dollars and cents. It could have easily gone the other way if I earned less or if the mortgage was a lot more. And I would be the same man, morally.

People who pass judgments rarely put themselves in the other person's shoes. Words are cheap, actions speak louder.
Copyright 1996-2014 trademark and the "Fool" logo is a trademark of The Motley Fool, Inc. Contact Us