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URL:  http://boards.fool.com/catherine-you-have-no-idea-what-i-know-or-30509978.aspx

Subject:  Re: On second thought, 2828 - Small Cap Issue Date:  1/28/2013  12:05 AM
Author:  CCinOC Number:  668651 of 726813

Catherine you have no idea what I know or understand. I have over 300 hours of college credits, more than a hundred of them graduate credit hours. I had a double major in undergraduate school, Animal Science and Education. The whole 17 years I was working at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine I was allowed to take up to 8 semester hours free every semester. I fully took advantage of that benefit. I am also an AALAS Certified Laboratory Animal Technologist.

Quantum physics and popular physics are two different things.

http://physicsandphysicists.blogspot.com/2007/04/no-one-unde...

The issue here is what is meant by the word "understand". In physics, and among physicists, we usually consider something to be "fully understood" when it has reached a universal consensus that this is the most valid description of a phenomenon. We say that we understand Newton's Laws because it is well-tested and we know that it definitely work within a certainly range of condition. No one would question their use when building a house, for example. The same can be said about superconductivity before 1986. The BCS theory was so successful that it was of general consensus that the field has fully reached maturity and that we know all there is to know about it. The only thing left is simply added complexity to slightly tweak our understanding here and there. So one can say at that time that we have understood conventional superconductivity.

So in physics, the criteria to say that we understand something is very, very strict. It requires a well-verified theory that matches practically all of the empirical observations, and a general consensus among experts in the field that agree with it. This means that in many instances, physicists would tend to say that we don't understand so-and-so, because there are many areas of physics that haven't been fully answered, verified, or have reached a general consensus. To us, this does not allow us to say that we have understood it. But it certainly does not mean we know NOTHING about it.


I'm not saying you, Art, know nothing about physics. I'm sure you know more than me. I just seriously doubt that with your background in Animal Science and Education, you understand very much at all about quantum physics. You just don't have the necessary background.
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