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Subject:  Re: FYI: Android inserts NSA "trojans" Date:  7/10/2013  8:17 PM
Author:  mmrmnhrm Number:  428416 of 461123

I wonder exactly what "others" in the community "vetted" the NSA's generous code contribution to ensuring my personal data remains "secure" and inaccessible (to everyone but them, I suspect).

Those "others" include anybody with an internet connection and the ability to program. Want to try it for yourself? The instructions on how to download the source code are right here: http://source.android.com/source/downloading.html

If NSA staff worked on this for "sheer love for the product", while on the clock, I, as a taxpayer, have a problem with that.
If the NSA allows staff to work on this, instead of tracking down bad guys, I, as a taxpayer, have a problem with that.


I do not. The stuff NSA (and others) develop, then give away for free, become integral parts of systems that protect credit card systems, health insurance records, electrical infrastructure, manufacturing control, and all sorts of other things. It's very shortsighted to think that this is just a handful of people wasting time. It's thousands of people, all across the planet, poking and prodding, looking for ways the software could break and then fixing those weaknesses. The package that drives nearly all credit card accepting websites, OpenSSL, is developed by a team of folks lead by a Canuck who (to put it mildly) has the reputation of being a complete and total asshat to people he feels are being stupid. However, his software has a security record that puts every single commercial (aka Windows, MacOS, SunOS, etc) to shame. And he gives it away for free. Why? Because he'd rather people use his solution than risk his info being hacked when someone else tried to reinvent the wheel, ended up with a triangle, and called it "good enough."
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