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URL:  http://boards.fool.com/my-wife-and-i-have-about-30k-worth-of-vz-which-30917859.aspx

Subject:  Re: VZ - hold or sell? Date:  10/10/2013  11:50 PM
Author:  aj485 Number:  73487 of 76115

My wife and I have about $30K worth of VZ which was inherited and sitting in an account at Computershare. It's doubled in value since 2005 as we're reinvesting the dividend, and as between jobs at the time, we're looking at possibly selling this as cashflow for the next few months.

Question is, since it's just been sitting there anyway - is it better to let it set another 15 years until retirement or pull $$ out of a different source, which are:

$180K in mutual funds at Vangard
$150K in HELOC credit at variable which is now 4.25%


I would say that you should not borrow to fund current living expenses while you have no income and assets in taxable accounts that are available to sell, so I would cross off borrowing from the HELOC as an option at this point.

I would also ask what percentage the VZ is of your overall investment portfolio, including 401(k)s, 403(b)s, IRAs, etc.? If it's more than 5% of your total invested assets, I would say that you are running a large single stock risk, and should probably be looking to sell this stock anyway. (It's about 14% of the $210k in assets you show, so unless assets in accounts that you aren't showing are at least $390k, it's over 5% of your total investment portfolio.)

Whatever assets you choose to sell, be sure that you set aside money to pay any taxes that you will incur, before you start spending any of the money from the sale of those assets. If you have been out of work for a while, and have a relatively low income so far this year, this might be a good time to sell highly appreciated assets anyway, as you may get a significantly lower tax rate. You may also want to look at making conversions from traditional accounts to Roth accounts this year, if it's a low income year, so you can take advantage of lower tax rates.

AJ
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