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URL:  http://boards.fool.com/i-am-not-at-all-clear-that-the-better-scientific-31137025.aspx

Subject:  Re: Arctic Ice Date:  2/25/2014  4:48 PM
Author:  1poorguy Number:  445523 of 459228

I am not at all clear that the better scientific minds really think of a tipping point. And if they do I dont think they really define it the way the alarmist do.

As I said, not my field. I do recall reading an article many years ago that there is a point which, when reached, will result in a runaway greenhouse effect. It will self-reinforce (i.e. feedback will sustain it). I don't now recall the details. It's very possible current scientific thinking has abandoned that idea.

Science is moving ahead suddenly at a very fast pace.

I don't know about "suddenly", but it definitely is moving VERY fast today. My chief concern is what seems to be a growing segment of the population who doesn't really understand "science". I'm not referring to the nitty-gritty of 37 chemical reactions. I'm talking about how an observation leads to a hypothesis that leads to testing that leads to theories, and those theories are further refined with more data, etc, going through peer review and scrutiny and criticism until we finally "know" something. Perhaps imperfectly, but we "know" it. And people respond with "it's just a theory" (because they think a theory is a guess). And they think themselves competent to cherry-pick some data and hold it up as proof that scientists don't really know anything, they're just guessing, they just want to get rich on research grants (ha!!!), etc.

Ignorance about how science works seems to be a growing problem, and it could prove catastrophic. Especially when science attempts to inform about the consequences of policy.

1poorguy
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