Message Font: Serif | Sans-Serif
 
No. of Recommendations: 4
Twelve across in this morning's crossword, was a seven letter word with three u's in it.
I thought, "That's unusual."
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 4
On the other hand, there was the guy who had something wrong with him and went to see a doctor. The doctor gave him a thorough examination, and gave him a battery of tests. Finally he told the guy what his diagnosis was: "You have Tom Jones Syndrome." "Hmmm, Tom Jones Syndrome? I've never heard of a disease like that ... is it rare?" "Well," came the answer, "it's not unusual."

culcha
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Speaking of rarities - we know lots of verbs that end in "ify" (diversify, nullify, satisfy, etc.) What two common verbs end in "efy"?
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
"What two common verbs end in "efy"? "

Liquefy and stupefy come to mind. There may be others.

~aj
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Liquefy and stupefy come to mind. There may be others.

Pretty good!
Also, hint: rarity.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
Does defy count?

goof
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
rarefy
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
"What two common verbs end in "efy"? "

Liquefy and stupefy come to mind. There may be others.


The obvious one is "defy".
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Deify
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
Deify

Oops. Cancel that.

Dyslexia is a terrible thing.

MOI
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 3
Dyslexia is a terrible thing.

Why did they make it so hard to spell?
I would've called it "eeeee".
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Speaking of rarities - we know lots of verbs that end in "ify" (diversify, nullify, satisfy, etc.) What two common verbs end in "efy"?

Not having checked to see who has already said what.....

*defy

And I can't think of a second one.


sheila
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
rarefy


It's "rarify" as far as I know -- as in rarified gases, etc.


sheila
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
rarefy


It's "rarify" as far as I know -- as in rarified gases, etc.


Half right... another case where English makes SO much sense.

The active verb is "rarefy". The passive verb is "rarify".

In other words, you rarefy the gas to produce a rarified gas.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
The active verb is "rarefy". The passive verb is "rarify".

In other words, you rarefy the gas to produce a rarified gas.


And people think Chinese is a hard language to learn!

LWW
Print the post Back To Top
Advertisement