No. of Recommendations: 0
I am new to Supernova. I bought some AAPL, but I am now down about 8%. Not being able to maneuver around all of the screens yet. Is AAPL still a recommended buy? How much is an acceptable downside before selling, and maybe buying back lower? Or do I hang on for lucrative dividends?
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
For SuperNova questions, I recommend you visit the SuperNova discussion boards:

http://newsletters.fool.com/1502/discussions/index.aspx

Fuskie
Who notes this is a public discussion board and TMF cannot address SuperNova specific questions here...
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
New55LadyFool,

In the future before you ever, EVER buy another stock, look at a chart such as AAPL and see that your on the correct side of the xover heading north.

As or Apple, you should have been out or shorted the stock way back to October 15th, 2012. The only time to back in is when the next xover occurs. After that date who ever recommeded AAPL is clueless and should be fired.

http://stockcharts.com/h-sc/ui?s=AAPL&p=D&yr=0&m...

As a swing trader, even though AAPL is going deeper and deeper underwater we still make a lot of money per the bubbles and or labels for some.


Quillnpenn - a poor church mouse scatching for a living as a porfessional Swing Trader buying from the Scared, Selling to the Greedy.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
…whoever recommended AAPL is clueless and should be fired.

Now, now, Quillnpenn. Calm down. You’re letting the details of how investment scams play out cloud your judgment.

Of course, the Supernova tipsters would recommend Apple’s stock to them that believe that buying on tips is a sound investment policy. That’s what tipsters do. They tip stocks , and --at worst-- the tipsters will prove to be wrong only 56% of the time (as study after study of stock forecasters has demonstrated), or only slightly worse than a coin flip.

What’s not to like about that? For the low, low cost of a couple hundred bucks a year, the suckers who follow the tipsters (like pigs and sheep to the slaughter house) get a club membership and some cheap entertainment to boot.

Come on, get serious. Do you really, really think that the idiots who buy stocks on the recommendations of others --rather than on the merits of their own due- diligence -- really care whether they will lose money on average and over the long haul? For them, investing in stocks in like going to Vegas to gamble. They buy stocks for the thrills, for the excitement, not to make money.

Charlie
------------
Hah, AAPL just fell through yet another support level. http://finance.yahoo.com/echarts?s=AAPL#symbol=aapl;range=5d... That's a move that surprises even me. I thought prices would return to $440. But as I also wrote in another forum, until AAPl retraces to that level, breaks through resistance, retraces back to support, and then moves higher, no investor should be buying that stock. The idiots who call themselves "investors", but who are really just "gamblers", can do whatever they want. They're just shooting from the hip, without a clue fundamentally or technically, as to what they are doing.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
Quill,

Take a look at this chart. http://stockcharts.com/h-sc/ui?s=AAPL&p=D&yr=0&m... What do you see? A classic “measured move” being playing out, right? So let’s grind through the chart.

What’s the “action-reaction” pattern? The candle on Feb wasn’t quite the indecisivedogi that normally marks a pivot point. But volume did fall off that day for the third day in a row, and prices had tagged the upper band of the Keltner channel. In other words, warning bells would have been ringing for anyone who has the least bit of a clue as to how to interpret a price-volume chart. It could not have been known at that point that prices would reverse. But that should have been their high-probability expectation, and they should have been positioning themselves accordingly. Note the closing price on that day and round it. Call that $485 price, Point A, the starting point of our Measured Move.

Per expectation, prices do reverse the next day, and they don’t stop until they’ve penetrated the lower band of the Keltner channel on Feb 21. Volume that day provides no clues. But the candle does. It is a classic dogi. Buyers and seller have come back into balance with each other. Neither has the edge. But this much can be said. When prices stop going down, they will go back up. Again, as before, note the price on that day and round it. Call that $443 price, Point B, of our Measured Move.

Now, here’s where things can get tricky. Depending on the next time- frame up, prices could reverse or they could continue their current short-term direction. Since the intermediate move in ‘down’, the expectation should be that a bear flag will form, and the prices will roll over again, which is exactly what happens. Again, note the price of the highpoint, round it, and call that $455 price, Point C, of our Measured Move.

Now we have enough info to predict where prices are headed next. The move from A to B was 42 points. Therefore, the move from C (which we have seen) to D (which we haven’t yet seen) will also be about 42 points. Subtract $42 from the value of Point C, and a price target of $423 can be predicted. Where are price trading today? At $422. In other words, using very, very, very, very, very, very simple tools, expectations can be formed and risks can be managed.

Will Technical Analysis always provide such clear-cut answers? Fat chance of that ever happening, right? But when stocks are being traded by traders who are keenly aware of the tools their counter-parties are also using, then the stock game begins to have a predictability that shouldn’t be there, but nonetheless is. Any “investor” who ignores the risk-management tools at their disposal is a total idiot who deserves to lose every penny of their account.

That's the value of Technical Analysis. It can be an aid --and sometimes it is the only aid-- to keeping yourself out of the troubles that your fundamentalist work can say nothing meaningful about. Is Apple a good company? Who gives a crap if the stock is getting trashed for whatever reasons, and a clear bottom is nowhere in sight, nor is meaningful evidence that the selling is done? When that does happen --and it will-- then is the time to step in and buy. Meanwhile, investors should be standing aside, rather than trying to catch a falling knife. And never, ever, ever, should they be listening to the idiot stock tipsters (and that includes me. LOL )

Do your OWN Due-Diligence, Folks, or else find another game to play.

Charlie
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Don't y just love uncertainty? With AAPL it all hangs on the "right" CEO.
Print the post Back To Top
Advertisement