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Author: LuckyDog2002 Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 753960  
Subject: amazon's best read of the yr. Date: 12/9/2012 1:39 PM
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in the Parade mag this morning.....

"The Round House" by Louise Erdrich.


Has anyone read it yet? I've never heard of it.

Dog
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Author: catmeyoo Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659124 of 753960
Subject: Re: amazon's best read of the yr. Date: 12/9/2012 4:04 PM
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in the Parade mag this morning.....

"The Round House" by Louise Erdrich.


Has anyone read it yet? I've never heard of it.

Dog


I'm reading it right now and must finish it today because it is due at the library tomorrow. Get it and try it. A son and his father, a tribal judge, try to avenge the rape of their mother and wife, attacked on a North Dakota reservation.

I have read her for many years, not everything, but a number of her novels and short stories (her stories often appeared in the New Yorker) and have always meant to read them all. She is known primarily for her poetry and novels but has also published some nonfiction, mostly on Native Americans. She was married to Michael Dorris, also a talented writer and scholar, now deceased. He helped found the Native American Studies at Dartmouth (try Yellow Days in Blue Water--try listening to it on tape if you want to hear something beautiful-- wish I could remember who read the version I listened to; I'd like to live with a print copy someday too).

The theme of North American Indians-white relations runs through her work. She grew up in a small town in North Dakota and is half Chippewa and half German. Her first novel, Love Medicine (which grew out of a short-story collaboration between her and Dorris early on) won a Book Critics Circle Award and her novel The Master Butchers Singing Club, was a finalist for the National Book Award She has won many other awards for both her poetry and novels through the years.

The Round House is set in a small North Dakota town, often the case, sometimes in Minnesota, generally on or around reservations. Her local settings remind me of Chadron because we are right next to the Pine Ridge and Rosebud Reservations and our local Indians (their preferred name) are the Lakota Sioux and we have had similar experiences. The same set of characters runs through many of her novels.

Here is a tidbit sample of Louise Erdrich's writing from "Naked Woman Playing Chopin" As you are now a musician in training on your recorder you owe it to yourself to read the entire passage from the link I'm providing <g>. As a pianist I don't know what piece of writing I've enjoyed more. You can certainly see the poet in her here. I remember reading this years ago and being struck by it as if by lightening. It is perhaps not a fair sample because it IS so intense. Well, music can do that to you and I have forgiven her. I was glad to see her getting deserved attention and in a year with a lot of other great novels published too.

================================================================
From "Naked Women Playing Chopin" by Louise Erdrich:

She had once been Agnes DeWitt and now was Sister Cecellia, shorn, houseled clothed in black wool and bound in starched linen of heatless white. She not only taught but lived music, existed for those hours when she could be concentrated in her being—which was half music, half divine light, flesh only to the degree that she could not admit otherwise. At the piano keyboard, absorbed into the notes that rose beneath her hands, she existed in her essence, a manifestation of compelling sound. Her hands were long and thick-veined, very white, startling against her habit. She rubbed them with lard and beeswax nightly to keep them supple. During the day, when she graded papers or used the blackboard her hands twitched and drummed, patterned and repatterned difficult fingerings. She was no trouble to live with and her obedience was absolute. Only, and with increasing concentration, she played Brahms, Beethoven, Debussy, Schubert, and Chopin.

It wasn't that she neglected her other duties; rather, it was the playing itself—distilled of longing—that disturbed her sisters. In her music Sister Cecellia explored profound emotions. She spoke of her faith and doubt, of her passion as the bride of Christ, of her loneliness, shame, ultimate redemption. The Brahms she played was thoughtful, the Schubert confounding. Debussy was all contrived nature and yet as gorgeous as a meadowlark. Beethoven contained all messages, but her crescendos lacked conviction. When it came to Chopin, however, she did not use the flowery ornamentation or the endless trills and insipid floribunda of so many of her day. Her playing was of the utmost sincerity. And Chopin, played simply, devastates the heart. Sometimes a pause between the piercing sorrows of minor notes made a sister scrubbing the floor weep into the bucket where she dipped her rag so that the convent's boards, washed in tears, seemed to creak in a human tongue. The air of the house thickened with sighs.

Sister Cecellia, however, was emptied. Thinned. It was as though her soul were neatly removed by a drinking straw and siphoned into the green pool of quiet that lay beneath the rippling cascades of notes. One day, exquisite agony built and released, built higher, released more forcefully until slow heat spread between her fingers, up her arms, stung at the points of her bound breasts, and then shot straight down.

Her hands flew off the keyboard —she crouched as though she had been shot, saw yellow spots, and experienced a peaceful wave of oneness in which she entered pure communion. She was locked into the music, held there safely, entirely understood. Such was her innocence that she didn't know she was experiencing a sexual climax, but believed, rather, that what she felt was the natural outcome of this particular nocturne played to the utmost of her skills—and so it came to be. Chopin's spirit became her lover. His flats caressed her. His whole notes sank through her body like clear pebbles. His atmospheric trills were the flicker of a tongue. His pauses before the downward sweep of notes nearly drove her insane.

The Mother Superior knew something had to be done when she herself woke, her face bathed in sweat and tears, to the insinuating soft largo of the Prelude in E Minor. In those notes she remembered the death of her mother and sank into an endless afternoon of her loss. The Mother Superior then grew, in her heart, a weed of rage against the God who had taken a mother from a seven-year-old child whose world she was, entirely, without question—heart, arms, guidance, soul—until by evening she felt fury steaming from the hot marrow of her bones and stopped herself.

"Oh, God, forgive me," the Superior prayed. She considered humunculation, but then rushed down to the piano room instead, and with all of the strength in her wide old arms gathered and hid from Cecellia every piece of music but the Bach.

After that, for some weeks, there was relief. Sister Cecellia turned to the Two-Part Inventions. Her fingers moved on the keys with the precision of an insect building its nest. She played each as though she were constructing an airtight box. Stealthily, once Cecellia had moved on to Bach's other works, the Mother Superior removed from the music cabinet and destroyed the Goldberg Variations—clearly capable of lifting subterranean complexities into the mind. Life in the convent returned to normal. The cook, to everyone's gratitude, stopped preparing the rancid, goose-fat-laced beet soup of her youth and stuck to overcooked string beans, cabbage, potatoes. The floors stopped groaning and absorbed fresh wax. The doors ceased to fly open for no reason and closed discreetly. The water stopped rushing through the pipes as the sisters no longer took continual advantage of the new plumbing to drown out the sounds of their emotions.

And then one day Sister Cecellia woke with a tightness in her chest. Pain shot through her and the red lump in her rib cage beat like a wild thing caught in a snare of bones. Her throat shut. She wept. Her hands, drawn to the keyboard, floated into a long appoggiatura. Then, crash, she was inside a thrusting mazurka. The music came back to her. There was the scent of faint gardenias—his hothouse boutonnière. The silk of his heavy brown hair. His sensuous drawing-room sweat. His voice—she heard it—avid and light. It was as if the composer himself had entered the room. Who knows? Surely there was no more desperate, earthly, exacting heart than Cecellia's. Surely something, however paltry, lies beyond the grave.

At any rate, she played Chopin. Played him in utter naturalness until the Mother Superior was forced to shut the cover to the keyboard and gently pull the stool away. Cecellia lifted the lid and played upon her knees. The poor scandalized dame dragged her from the keys. Cecellia crawled back. The Mother, at her wit's end, sank down and urged the young woman to pray. She herself spoke first in fear and then in certainty, saying that it was the very Devil who had managed to find a way to Cecellia's soul through the flashing doors of sixteenth notes. Her fears were confirmed when, not moments later, the gentle sister raised her arms and fists and struck the keys as though the instrument were stone and from the rock her thirst would be quenched. But only discord emerged.

"My child, my dear child," the Mother comforted, "come away and rest yourself."

The younger nun, breathing deeply, refused. Her severe gray eyes were rimmed in a smoky red. Her lips bled purple. She was in torment. "There is no rest," she declared. She unpinned her veil and studiously dismantled her habit, folding each piece with reverence and setting it upon the piano bench. The Mother remonstrated with Cecellia in the most tender and compassionate tones. However, just as in the depth of her playing the virgin had become the woman, so now the woman in the habit became a woman to the bone. She stripped down to her shift, but no further.

"He wouldn't want me to go out unprotected," she told her Mother Superior.

"God?" the older woman asked, bewildered.

"Chopin," Cecellia answered.

http://www.barcelonareview.com/34/e_le.htm

Here is write up of Erdlich along with a bibliography.

http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/louise-erdrich

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Author: catmeyoo Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659125 of 753960
Subject: Re: amazon's best read of the yr. Date: 12/9/2012 4:06 PM
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Forgot to say--The Round House also won the National Book Award for 2012 last month.

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Author: catmeyoo Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659126 of 753960
Subject: Re: amazon's best read of the yr. Date: 12/9/2012 4:10 PM
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Aargh! The Michael Dorris book I recommended is entitltedYellow Raft in Blue Water, not Yellow Days in Blue Water My goodness it makes all the difference in the world. Yellow days indeed.

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Author: riprock45 Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659127 of 753960
Subject: Re: amazon's best read of the yr. Date: 12/9/2012 4:33 PM
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From "Naked Women Playing Chopin" by Louise Erdrich:


Sorry, you can only recommend a post to the Best of once.

Thanks,

Rip

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Author: gurdison Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659499 of 753960
Subject: Re: amazon's best read of the yr. Date: 12/11/2012 6:22 PM
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<When it came to Chopin, however, she did not use the flowery ornamentation or the endless trills and insipid floribunda of so many of her day. Her playing was of the utmost sincerity. And Chopin, played simply, devastates the heart.>


I'm surprised 2828 didn't pick up on this.

Have you seen the DVD marking the 40th anniversary of the Doors L.A. Woman album? It is a good watch for the overall insight into how the material was produced and the work that went into it.

One of the bits shows keyboardest Ray Manzarek talking about the song Hyacinth House. He mentions that one of the keyboard pieces he plays during the song is directly borrowed from fellow countryman Chopin. Listening to it more closely, you realize how the sum of the parts again exceeded the very good individual pieces. Each musician was at the top of their game and the lyrics were spot on.

Morrison lamented that he needed a brand new friend, "I need someone...who doesn't need me". The musical arrangements really brought out the best on all of the cuts. Morrisons voice was not in top form, yet his bandmates (plus Elvis' bass player Jerry Scheff) added a much fuller dimension to each song. The bass lines really speak to you on LA Woman and Riders on the Storm.

I like the idea of revisiting a classic LP when it is done intelligently with people who were directly involved in the process.

Anyway, would you agree that Chopin devastates the heart?


B

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Author: 2828 Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Recommended Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659521 of 753960
Subject: Re: amazon's best read of the yr. Date: 12/11/2012 7:51 PM
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<When it came to Chopin, however, she did not use the flowery ornamentation or the endless trills and insipid floribunda of so many of her day. Her playing was of the utmost sincerity. And Chopin, played simply, devastates the heart.>


I'm surprised 2828 didn't pick up on this.

Have you seen the DVD marking the 40th anniversary of the Doors L.A. Woman album? It is a good watch for the overall insight into how the material was produced and the work that went into it.

One of the bits shows keyboardest Ray Manzarek talking about the song Hyacinth House. He mentions that one of the keyboard pieces he plays during the song is directly borrowed from fellow countryman Chopin. Listening to it more closely, you realize how the sum of the parts again exceeded the very good individual pieces. Each musician was at the top of their game and the lyrics were spot on.
------------------------------------------------------
That kind of music is outside my realm of experience.

I didn't even know about the 40th anniversary thing. I may have to look out for that. I just saw the Stones "Crossfire Hurricane" on HBO, it was pretty good but i think i liked 25x5 better.

Hyacinth House is one of my favorites so that Chopin guy is alright in my book <g>.

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Author: catmeyoo Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659578 of 753960
Subject: Re: amazon's best read of the yr. Date: 12/12/2012 3:53 AM
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Have you seen the DVD marking the 40th anniversary of the Doors L.A. Woman album? -- B

I, for one, haven’t—just looked in Amazon and Netflix and find two possibilities: Amazon has The Doors: Mr. Mojo Risin’, the story of LA Woman and Netflix has The Doors:LA Woman Live DVD. From what I can tell the Netflix one may be the remaining Doors performing all the songs they would have taken on tour together had Morrison lived, and the Amazon one has more commentary from the Doors themselves. I watched everything Netflix had several years ago but I see they have added a lot of stuff.

Which one did you see where Manzarek was talking about the Chopin? I love that. As keyboardists, Ray Manzarek with The Doors, and Garth Hudson with The Band brought so much to those two groups as a result of their classical training. I’m sure there are many other groups that have benefitted but those two really stand out for me.

2828 and I, and maybe others, just watched Chris Hillman’s talk at the Library of Congress and he tells how the Byrds’ appealing and memorable arrangement opening on Dylan’s Mr. Tambourine Man, played by Roger McGuinn on his “jangly” Rickenbacker 12-string guitar, was straight out of J. S. Bach’s “Jesu Joy of Man’s Desiring,” and plays the strain to demonstrate. Cool.

Here is a Chopin piece I learned for recitals and competitions. It was popular, too, with the troops during the Christmas we spent touring bases in the Caribbean. When the second theme opens you can hear that a song writer borrowed from Chopin to write the popular song “I’m Always Chasing Rainbows”. As Dylan says, everyone borrows, get off my back.

Vladimir Horowitz plays Chopin's Fantasie-Impromptu Op. 66
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x93pwAvUkAA

Chopin is the pianist’s composer for many of us of course, with almost everything he wrote being for piano solo, with the exception of two piano concertos and a little chamber music. He is a joy to play and a joy to hear, and the more familiar you become with his music the more it gives you.

Back to the Doors though, and their wonderful music, I also love their adaptation of The Alabama Song from the 1930 Kurt Weill and Bertoldt Brecht opera The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny

Here is Valentina Valente as Jenny Hill in a recent performance
at the Teatro Valli in Reggio Emilia, 2005. Show Me the Way To the Next Whiskey Bar, Oh Don't Ask Why, Oh Don't Ask Why
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vEqrPuhAb1s

I saw this opera performed live in San Francisco and felt it deep in my German soul <g> -- became a huge Kurt Weill fan after that. It would have been around the same time as the Doors were adapting it for their own performance because I had free tickets which meant I was working in an entry level position in the Art and Music Department at that time, (1969-1971) and we received free tickets to many performances around town, usually not enough for everyone so we fought over who got what, and I must have fought for Mahagonny. It makes me feel good that I was loving Alabama Song at the same time as the Doors were loving it and fitting it into their permanent repertoire.

Weill wrote so much gorgeous theater music, but also some popular songs—“September Song,” with (lyrics by Maxfield Anderson), and “Mack the Knife”, written for his wife, Lotta Lenya, and made popular here by Bobby Darin.

Mack the Knife sung by Lotta Lenya in the original German
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aPG9GcykPIY

And
“September Song” Jimmy Durante, 1955
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wte1uk4A5eU


Anyway, would you agree that Chopin devastates the heart? -- B

I do, as well as being uplifting and thrilling. So beautiful. The nocturnes, quiet and lovely, the waltzes, the mazurkas, even the etudes-- study exercises. They are all wonderful, both to play and to hear played by a master. The Revolutionary Etude can be a wonderful work for a young, talented pianist because you can sound as if you are in command of the keyboard--when really it isn't that technically difficult. It gives you a sense of power and encouragement to sound like that when you are just a teenie bopper, still wet behind the ears.

Liberace was a master of that--finding showy pieces, at fast tempos, that sound difficult and have you up and down all over the keyboard with great flourishes but that really are not that difficult for a trained and talented pianist. Works like Richard Addinsell's Warsaw Concerto and the Suite Andalucia by Ernesto Lecuona. I heard the Warsaw Concerto somewhere when I was young and liked it and asked my piano teacher if I could work on it and perform it for our upcoming recital. She told me no, she would prefer not, and said that Addinsell’s concerto sounded like something Rachmoninoff would write when he was drunk, I think that year she put me to work on Le Plus Que Lente by Claude Debussy wanting it to be recital ready. Incidently, I love Rachmaninoff’s piano works too, they are so romantic and melodic. Too much so for some, but I can listen to an album of his preludes and get positively maudlin and in the most wonderful way.

Sergei Rachmaninoff plays his Piano Concerto No. 2, 1929
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x8l37utZxMQ

I must admit I never had an unassisted orgasm listening to any musician though, even Chopin, as did Sister Cecelia. Of course I’ve never been as sexually repressed as an innocent nun either, at least not that I can recall. LOL, that reminds me of when tngirl told 2828 she listened to Van Morrison live and had several orgasms. I truly did love her. Wish I could have toured the south with her—she’s one I’d like to see and get to know better if Art turns out to be right. I’d write her right into my after life world.

Addendum:

I musn't be unfair to Liberace though. I have also heard him play Lizst, for example, who is always technically challenging, as well as other difficult pieces, and I think the reason he sometimes chose pieces like Warsaw and Malaguena often was because audiences loved them the first time they heard them. Like top 40 hits--sometimes love them immediately, maybe not so much by the 10th time.

For comparison: Young man on youtube modestly playing Malaguena from the Suite Andalucia by Ernesto Lecuona.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D0dVFCBOPVg

Liberace hamming it up playing Malaguena from the Suite Andalucia by Ernesto Lecuona.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pn7ImsFM13k

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Author: arrete Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659588 of 753960
Subject: Re: amazon's best read of the yr. Date: 12/12/2012 8:36 AM
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We're playing Chopin today at recorder. I can guarantee you it won't lift the heart. Also a little Shostakovich. Waltz 2 from the Jazz Suite.

arrete

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Author: ariechert Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659592 of 753960
Subject: Re: amazon's best read of the yr. Date: 12/12/2012 9:02 AM
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"I must admit I never had an unassisted orgasm listening to any musician though, even Chopin, as did Sister Cecelia. Of course I’ve never been as sexually repressed as an innocent nun either, at least not that I can recall. LOL, that reminds me of when tngirl told 2828 she listened to Van Morrison live and had several orgasms. I truly did love her. Wish I could have toured the south with her—she’s one I’d like to see and get to know better if Art turns out to be right. I’d write her right into my after life world." - catmeyoo
------------------


Whew! What a woman! I wish I'd known you when I was young and single. Like when I drove from Vero Beach, Florida up to Seattle, Washington with the crazy idea that I was going to work on a fishing boat in Alaska. I would have stopped off in Chadron, Nebraska, or wherever you were at that time, and spent some time getting to know you. Man, that was a long time ago. I think it was like in 1972 sometime, or thereabouts. I think I was about nineteen years old. I would have definitely fallen in love.

Art

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Author: 2828 Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Recommended Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659598 of 753960
Subject: Re: amazon's best read of the yr. Date: 12/12/2012 9:23 AM
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Weill wrote so much gorgeous theater music, but also some popular songs—“September Song,” with (lyrics by Maxfield Anderson), and “Mack the Knife”, written for his wife, Lotta Lenya, and made popular here by Bobby Darin.
------------------------------------------------------------
Ahhh, i didn't know that. Morrison sang Mack The Knife too.

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Author: catmeyoo Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659611 of 753960
Subject: Re: amazon's best read of the yr. Date: 12/12/2012 10:22 AM
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Whew! What a woman!I wish I'd known you when I was young and single. Like when I drove from Vero Beach, Florida up to Seattle, Washington with the crazy idea that I was going to work on a fishing boat in Alaska. I would have stopped off in Chadron, Nebraska, or wherever you were at that time, and spent some time getting to know you. Man, that was a long time ago. I think it was like in 1972 sometime, or thereabouts. I think I was about nineteen years old. I would have definitely fallen in love. -- Art

1972. You could have found me in the Art and Music Department behind the reference desk at the San Francisco Public Library in Civic Center, the best job ever. I could have hired you as a page (they made good money at SFPL) and you could have earned a little traveling money before heading off for Seattle, and we could have flirted on and off all day long while never shirking our duty of course.

Alaska seemed to attract young men then--in 1970 my son's dad, who I had met the first month I moved to San Francisco, left for Seattle to try to get on the pipeline in Alaska, make a big killing in a couple years, and then come back and buy us a house and marry me. The pipeline fell through, he came back in 3 months. We didn't buy a house but he did marry me. December 10, 1970. Our anniversary was 2 days ago.

Those were great years--he tried to write the great American novel during the day and was night manager at the Pickwick Hotel downtown at night. I had my good job at the library, and we had free rent because together we managed an apartment building at Church and Market. It wasn't all harmonious, more like the days of wine and roses, but looking back it seems pretty sweet.

That fishing boat thing sounds good. Not your weather though. Wasn't it great being young and making all those memories.

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Author: catmeyoo Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659612 of 753960
Subject: Re: amazon's best read of the yr. Date: 12/12/2012 10:32 AM
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Ahhh, i didn't know that. Morrison sang Mack The Knife too.
--------------------------

Ahhh, i didn't know that. Just listened on youtube--very nice. The Doors were so cool.

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Author: Colovion Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659628 of 753960
Subject: Re: amazon's best read of the yr. Date: 12/12/2012 11:05 AM
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I thought it was, "I Am a Liberal: A Conservative's Guide to Dealing With Nature's Most Irritating Mistake" by Kurt Schlichter! That's what I get for listening to... Kurt Schlichter. I've lost faith in everything now!

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Subject: Re: amazon's best read of the yr. Date: 12/12/2012 11:10 AM
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I'd also like to point out that I'd be more likely to read a book titled "The Round House" if it were written by Chuck Norris.

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Subject: Re: amazon's best read of the yr. Date: 12/12/2012 11:32 AM
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"That fishing boat thing sounds good. Not your weather though. Wasn't it great being young and making all those memories." - catmeyoo


Yes it was. I suspicion that is the whole point of life. I remember reading a quote online that said something to the effect of "never forget how beautiful you were when you were young." Memories.

I think that may be what our afterlife is made up of, the things we loved and "bound" in life. But not just our own memories; we'll have access to all the memories of the entire universe. I think it's a holographic universe connectedness oneness thing. Sort of like being connected to the entire internet for the entire universe in our consciousness.

excerpt from Mark H's NDE:
"Suddenly I thought of a mountain, I had seen as a child. When I looked up from the road there it was; The Mountain! Not just the mountain! But the most breathtaking mountain I had ever seen! Details the likes of which no one could imagine. Colors shades of color, shadows for which there are no words in the human language to describe it." http://www.nderf.org/NDERF/NDE_Experiences/mark_h's_nde.htm

"I could have hired you as a page (they made good money at SFPL) and you could have earned a little traveling money before heading off for Seattle, and we could have flirted on and off all day long while never shirking our duty of course." - catmeyoo

Wouldn't that have been fun? Flirting while working was fun. When I managed the animal facilities I tried real hard not to do it since I was married. I tried to keep everything on the up and up, no off comments, no sexual harrassment, but some of the young girls were flirty and it was difficult not to flirt back. Not to smile or sit and talk too much but just keep my mind on the work we had to do. One cute little redheaded girl that worked for me showed me a tattoo she'd gotten down below her waist-pant's line and she just rolled down her pants and showed it off to me. I bet my face turned bright red. It was down around her groin area. Whew!

Now I'm old and shot. Arthritis, my get up and go has pretty much got up and went. I can still get around and do stuff but I'm not driven like I was. I just finished making some banana pudding with instant pudding, whole milk, Nabisco vanilla wafers, and two sliced bananas. I also made some homemade pimento cheese with no added sugar because my wife tries not to eat sugar and she won't eat artificial sugar either. Then I loaded the dishwasher with all the gooey dishes and started it because it's easier than trying to wash all that stuff by hand.

That's my life now. Stuck in Tennessee and I'm not going anywhere.

Art

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Author: lowstudent Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659648 of 753960
Subject: Re: amazon's best read of the yr. Date: 12/12/2012 11:42 AM
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I'd also like to point out that I'd be more likely to read a book titled "The Round House" if it were written by Chuck Norris.
________________________

Not much of a Norris fan, but where it written By F Lloyd Wright I'd give it a whirl, but I'd probably only look at the pictures.

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Author: BGinNJ Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659685 of 753960
Subject: Re: amazon's best read of the yr. Date: 12/12/2012 1:13 PM
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To eliminate any confusion, it is The Story of L.A. Woman DVD. The references to Chopin is near the end on the section that describes Hyacinth House.

Thanks for the references to Chopin and Weill. I would guess that you already have the 1980's CD called Lost in the Stars- The Music of Kurt Weill. It features tracks by a very diverse set of singers from Sting, Van Dyke Parks, Lou reed, Tom Waits, Aaron Neville, Todd Rundgren, and Marrianne Faithful.

In the album notes, Lotte Lenya (Weill's wife and collaborator) is said to have loved the Doors version of Alabama Song. Weill died in 1950 before Rock and Roll got off the ground. The notes also refer to Weill and Brecht as the original Glimmer Twins.

Anyway, if you don't have it you should add it to your collection


B (note my name change in finally getting with the times)

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Author: 2828 Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Recommended Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659688 of 753960
Subject: Re: amazon's best read of the yr. Date: 12/12/2012 1:19 PM
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gurd, what have you done! Why the change?

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Author: BGinNJ Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659877 of 753960
Subject: Re: amazon's best read of the yr. Date: 12/13/2012 1:06 PM
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Well I thought about changing my screen name for some time, but never got around to it. A couple of other choices were taken. I don't know if this one is just right or not, but I will keep it for now. This is the only place where I have used my name.

I considered using 1414, but felt that was a bit too derivative and would be viewed as patronizing. Do you find yourself using 1414 when you sing the song Yesterday in the privacy of your home? "Suddenly, I'm not half the man I used to be...".

Anyway 5656 was ruled out as being too egotistical. 1313 was too Munsterish. 1984 was too Orwellian. 9999 would be too endless. 0000 would be too presidential. I tried Ice-9 some years back, but it wouldn't take. That comes from my favorite Vonnegut novel Cat's Cradle. I believe it was also the name of the Greatful Dead's music publishing company. That was surely where they borrowed it from.

Finally, I considered using an anagram like Jim Morrison did for LA Woman, but none came to me quickly enough. So I settled for an easy one, not necessarily the best one.


B

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Author: ascenzm Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659881 of 753960
Subject: Re: amazon's best read of the yr. Date: 12/13/2012 1:40 PM
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Well I thought about changing my screen name for some time, but never got around to it. A couple of other choices were taken. I don't know if this one is just right or not, but I will keep it for now. This is the only place where I have used my name.

I considered using 1414, but felt that was a bit too derivative and would be viewed as patronizing. Do you find yourself using 1414 when you sing the song Yesterday in the privacy of your home? "Suddenly, I'm not half the man I used to be...".

Anyway 5656 was ruled out as being too egotistical. 1313 was too Munsterish. 1984 was too Orwellian. 9999 would be too endless. 0000 would be too presidential. I tried Ice-9 some years back, but it wouldn't take. That comes from my favorite Vonnegut novel Cat's Cradle. I believe it was also the name of the Greatful Dead's music publishing company. That was surely where they borrowed it from.

Finally, I considered using an anagram like Jim Morrison did for LA Woman, but none came to me quickly enough. So I settled for an easy one, not necessarily the best one.


B




Man. It's a good thing I checked this thread. I'd never have known who BGinNJ was.

Mike

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Author: LuckyDog2002 Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659908 of 753960
Subject: Re: amazon's best read of the yr. Date: 12/13/2012 5:03 PM
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Aargh! The Michael Dorris book I recommended is entitltedYellow Raft in Blue Water, not Yellow Days in Blue Water My goodness it makes all the difference in the world. Yellow days indeed.
cat

...........

Good thing it wasn't Blue Raft in Yellow Snow :)

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Author: LuckyDog2002 Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659910 of 753960
Subject: Re: amazon's best read of the yr. Date: 12/13/2012 5:10 PM
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Well I thought about changing my screen name for some time, but never got around to it. A couple of other choices were taken. I don't know if this one is just right or not, but I will keep it for now. This is the only place where I have used my name.

I considered using 1414, but felt that was a bit too derivative and would be viewed as patronizing. Do you find yourself using 1414 when you sing the song Yesterday in the privacy of your home? "Suddenly, I'm not half the man I used to be...".

Anyway 5656 was ruled out as being too egotistical. 1313 was too Munsterish. 1984 was too Orwellian. 9999 would be too endless. 0000 would be too presidential. I tried Ice-9 some years back, but it wouldn't take. That comes from my favorite Vonnegut novel Cat's Cradle. I believe it was also the name of the Greatful Dead's music publishing company. That was surely where they borrowed it from.

Finally, I considered using an anagram like Jim Morrison did for LA Woman, but none came to me quickly enough. So I settled for an easy one, not necessarily the best one.


B/Gurdison

>>>>>>>>

Oh no!!!!!!!!!!!! You know what this means don't you? I'll have to click on your profile to remind myself who you are.........gahhhhhhh, my brain is stretched to the limit now. :)

why the change? the dog wants to know, something happened, spit it out...you've always been gurdison and I recognize you as one of the good guys, now it's BG and I'll think of the Gibb Bros......"Just like a woman, uhhhhhhhhh, just like a woman to me..." should I continue?

woof!

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Author: BGinNJ Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659930 of 753960
Subject: Re: amazon's best read of the yr. Date: 12/13/2012 8:05 PM
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LD:

I think your brain has plenty more room to stretch.

However, singing Bee Gees songs will tend to fill some of that space with things that just shouldn't be there.<g>

There wasn't a specific reason to change other than I finally decided it is not very smart to keep my name on a public web page. Of course it would have been smarter to do that 10+ years ago. I have always tried to be careful about not divulging too much personal information even though many here are my online family so to speak. Many young people today are blissfully unaware that they can put themselves at risk by posting to the world every single thought and action of theirs on a daily basis.

BTW, I have to admit that my technological ignorance has sometimes kept me from posting on some of the doggie threads that you often start. We have a cute little American Eskimo/Chihuahua mix named Toby who has brought lots of joy into our lives over the last two years. I am generally clueless about posting photos within a thread, so I tend to not jump into the mix. I long ago lost count of all the "He's so cute" comments he gets when I take him for his walks. I just tell him to not let it go to his head! He is a little bit feisty at times probably due to his Chihuahua DNA. I do read most of the posts you make on canine subjects as they are a welcome distraction from some of the depressing reality our country is living through and facing in the future.

There have been some extended family issues that have weighed on us for a long time now. It has taken a lot out of my wife and I both physically and emotionally as well as financially too. Having Toby from about 6 weeks of age has greatly helped me to keep close to an even keel. He still jumps at the door getting all excited when either of us comes home, even after a fairly short time away.

Technically, although Toby is with us 24/7, our grandaughter considers Toby to be HER dog. We see her usually twice a week. This is my first dog in decades, so it has been a relearning experience for me too. I thnk the 8 week puppy school we went to was just as much for us as it was for Toby.


BG

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Author: LuckyDog2002 Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659939 of 753960
Subject: Re: amazon's best read of the yr. Date: 12/13/2012 8:38 PM
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well I can't sing very well although I do try when I go to church, which is rare these days. These boys do it better than I do. :) Yes, it's the BeeGees...it reminds me of more innocent days.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xuESRImQMrU

Toby sounds like a real sweetie and I'm curious to see an American Eskimo and Chihuahua look like. How much does he weigh? I love tan and white, and black but truth be told all colors are pretty.

It is a responsibility being a pet owner, they have social, emotional, and physical needs just like kids and you have to train them early and often and yes, it's a lot of work. Puppy and all the other classes are for the owners to learn and practice and see other people and their dogs, it's good socialization for all the dogs. You get to see how the other dogs are learning too and whether or not the owner has been practicing. :) It's good fun and your dog loves your attention....bonding experience for both.

I'm sorry you've been having some difficult times with family issues. Seems like chit storms have been passing through lately...it's very stressful. Sometimes the only respite is a walk with the dog or a good movie. Knowing my dogs love me no matter what is very comforting. They are quick to forgive too, unlike humans. :) I have yelled at them at times and felt guilty afterwards. Usually it's when I'm tired. I take that back, I do something that doesn't work and I know better but it just rises up in me to tell my Jack to shut up when she barks incessantly when I close to door to leave. Gah! drives me batty. She's isn't going to change so I might as well just put in earplugs. She doesn't want me to leave without her and is alerting me to that fact. Bless her heart! :)

Well thanks for saying why you up and changed your handle after all these yrs. and I completely understand.

Let's see how BG suits you then. We could do a poll. ;)

Give Toby some scritches behind the ears for me.

LuckyDog

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Author: LuckyDog2002 Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659940 of 753960
Subject: Re: amazon's best read of the yr. Date: 12/13/2012 8:40 PM
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hey BG, does Toby look like this one?

http://www.adoptapet.com/pet/6594318-somerset-texas-american...

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Author: catmeyoo Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659979 of 753960
Subject: Re: amazon's best read of the yr. Date: 12/14/2012 2:59 AM
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I would guess that you already have the 1980's CD called Lost in the Stars- The Music of Kurt Weill. It features tracks by a very diverse set of singers from Sting, Van Dyke Parks, Lou reed, Tom Waits, Aaron Neville, Todd Rundgren, and Marrianne Faithful.

I don't--looked it up in Amazon and I can purchase it new for $367.74 from an independent dealer. There are a number of used copies, one with a rating of "very good" and notes indicating all inserts are in tact for 39.99 and a seller rating of 99%. Have to ponder. I want it. Will shop around a little.

To eliminate any confusion, it is The Story of L.A. Woman DVD. The references to Chopin is near the end on the section that describes Hyacinth House.

Thank you. After shopping for Weill and dealing with big numbers the L.A. Woman decision was simple. It was available new for $11.97, a mere pittance, and I ordered with one click.

I must decide whether to buy a whole lot of things I want in December and then resolve not to buy anything new in 2013. Or keep myself on a budget. My budget for books, cds and videos for 2012 was $100 a month total, not $100 for each. If you want even one thing that is kind of special and pricey you have spent almost your entire budget. Imagine this, though, if I was still a smoker I would be spending 3 or 4 hundred dollars a month on cigarettes. I have a big list of things I am saving that were over budget. I would love to buy them all at once and have them come in big boxes for Christmas. Sigh, it's a hard life with many struggles and decisions.

I like your new name. Maybe I need a new name. My name has been going out all week on SPAM to all kinds of places. I had to have my ISP enter a new password for me to their network this morning because some one got hold of mine and was sending that spam from my mailbox with headings like "Girlfriend looks unsatisfied? Grab needed remedies without prescription". Mailer-daemon was then returning hundreds, maybe thousands, to my mailbox as undeliverable for one reason or another--what was scary was many were from the military and I don't want to mess with the military. They did say early on that I might not be responsible and if so to just delete their message, but if I was the one sending out the messages and had questions about why they were not approved, call thus and so number.

When I started getting hundreds of returns from all over the map though I decided I better do something. I called my ISP guys and asked what to do. So now I have a brand new password--I don't know how they found that one but that's what the technicians told me had happened. It was one given years ago and by my ISP itself and had numbers and things like exclamation points, astericks, dollar signs, upper and lower case letters where you had to use the right case, and was about 12 characters long. They made up my new one too, and it is just as tricky, but I rarely have to use it--I just have to remember where it is if I need it. I don't keep a list of my passwords anywhere in my computer--just keep them in a card file in the office.

I googled "catmeyoo" today to see if there were all kinds of links to erectile dysfunction sites and products but no, I escaped that fate, at least for now. I really don't want to change my name--I've been happy with it and as far as I know it is pretty much one of a kind as I seem to be the only catmeyoo that turns up on the web.

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Author: BGinNJ Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 660128 of 753960
Subject: Re: amazon's best read of the yr. Date: 12/14/2012 4:57 PM
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Yes, Toby does look a lot like the dog in the photo.

He is 23 pounds and is sitting on my lap as I type this. I am going to have to get him to move as my leg is quickly falling asleep.

Toby actually was on tv when he was a pup. My wife saw him on Good Day New York on Channel 5 with Greg Kelly and Rosanna Scotto in November 2010. He was one of several dogs that the person in charge of the Unleashed program brought with her to highlight her organization. He stole the show. We actually tried to adopt Tobys sister but that fell through. The family that orginally adopted Toby changed their mind a few days later. It was never said, but methinks it was because of them having a 2 year old child who may have been nipped a few times by the 8 week old puppy. Nipping is not at all unusual as I found out in the next few months and in our puppy school classes. Anyway, the woman in charge of the program offered Toby to us and when we saw him we said yes.

Training and patience are key components to getting things to work out. Luck is an issue too. As with many things in this life if you want it to work out everyone involved has to be invested in the process.

There was a video of Toby'a appearance which I had long saved on my browser. I was going to post it for you here, but it seems to have been recently purged. Stupidly, I saved the page where the video was rather than the actual video. When I now type in unleashed on their web page the video is gone but the picture they have shows Toby being held by Greg Kelly. BTW, Kelly is the son of NYPD police commisioner Ray Kelly. He now does the 10 O'Clock news. Rosanna has long been a staple of the same network and her family owns a well known restaurant in the city.

Here is the link:

http://www.myfoxny.com/story/17448955/unleashed

If there is any way to find the orignal video, I am at a loss as to how to find it. Tboy is about 4-5 pounds in the photo. We were originally told he would be around 10-12 pounds, but the first vet we took him to said he would be over 20 pounds.


BG

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Author: ariechert Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 660132 of 753960
Subject: Re: amazon's best read of the yr. Date: 12/14/2012 5:06 PM
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BG shares, "Here is the link:

http://www.myfoxny.com/story/17448955/unleashed



Yes, Toby was a cute puppy. No doubt about it. I like his color. Very soothing. Nice size too. I like small dogs. Less food and Less poop. The two sort of go together.

Art

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Author: LuckyDog2002 Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 660143 of 753960
Subject: Re: amazon's best read of the yr. Date: 12/14/2012 5:35 PM
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I looked at the fox website, what a cutie!!!! a little ball of fluff.

it's hard to tell exactly how big they are going to get. I look at the paws, if they are big, usually the dog is going to be big. Of course, the paws could be medium size and they grow real long legs. At the vet yesterday, Sweetum's got a blood test, there was a Borzoi, which are the size of small ponies. Tall and spindly legs. 2828 would finally have his pony if he got one of those. :)

23 lbs. is a good size. The largest dog I've ever had is about 30 lbs. black lab/shepherd mix, a real sweetheart and my first failed foster. :) I adopted him. The jack is my 2nd failed foster. They both won though and I did too.


Was the dog's name Toby when you got him????

LD

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Author: ariechert Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 660172 of 753960
Subject: Re: amazon's best read of the yr. Date: 12/14/2012 9:23 PM
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"Was the dog's name Toby when you got him????" - LD


It is a cute name for a little dog. - Art

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