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I finally got a chance to see the latest edition of this movie with Warren Beatty and Annette Bening. Although the plot was a little updated for our time, I still like the original Cary Grant, Deborah Kerr flick. I guess I'm very sentimental. In many instances new and improved is great, but at other times I'll stick to the tried and true. Do you boomers find yourself at times hesitant about new things? Does it mean I should be put out to pasture?
Jo
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<<In many instances new and improved is great, but at other times I'll stick to the tried and true. Do you boomers find yourself at times hesitant about new things?>>
You are at least trying new things. The older I get the more I'm inclined to take the view that since it wasn't broke, why was it fixed? The tried and true is surely more comfortable. Even if that means the rut fits. I don't think I've seen one remake that was anywhere near as good as the original. Or is it that the distance lends enchantment?

Cheers,
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Hey, css, welcome to the Board. Hope you continue to contribute. You'll find we're a friendly bunch and that we love to get newcomers on board.

With respect to trying new things, do you realize how many of our peers still think computers are "new-fangled contraptions" that are designed only for the young? The fact that you are on-line Jo, along with the rest of us, indicate you're not as hesitant to try new things as you may think. ;)
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I'm with Kira on this one. Computers, voice-mail, ATMs, etc. - these are all new-fangled things that we are now quite accustomed to using.

My Dad still doesn't understand how a computer works (or why I spend so much time on mine!), has never had an ATM card and hates to leave me voice-mail.

So maybe it is a generational thing, to some degree. But I think that if you don't go with it, you fall behind. And I think that we are the better sometimes for knowing the old way and the new way. (Some younger folks can't add in their heads without a calculator.)

While not everything new is better, sometimes everything old is new again. Think about it!

Christina
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Hi css48:
Glad you dropped by. Hope you will stick around. Why not fill out a little bit more on your profile. We are an unusual mix, but a nice friendly crowd. Join the party.
Jo
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My Dad still doesn't understand how a computer works (or why I spend so much time on mine!), has never had an ATM card and hates to leave me voice-mail.

My father is an odd mix of the above. As an executive before he retired, he never touched a typewriter. He's now 67 and has learned how to type, search the net and send e-mail to the grandkids.

He's okay with voice mail, but like many men I know, he treats it like a long distance call--he yells into the phone. On long distance calls I figured he always thought a little extra effort would help the sound travel a long way. No idea why he does the same on voice mail (and, come to think of it, on a cell phone).

ATMs? That's a totally foreign concept to him. Never had one, never will. He and my mom use the drive-up window or actually go in the bank. Gee, and I use the grocery store or 7-11 when I need to do banking. ;)

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