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Author: sky1948 Two stars, 250 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 121189  
Subject: an inheritance question Date: 2/4/2000 8:46 PM
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I inherited some shares of the Franklin Oregon tax-free income fund that were in my mother's account for more than a year. They were moved to my account the end of December, 1999. I suppose I should be changing them over to shares of Franklin California tax-free. Or I could move them into another fund in the same family and not have to pay a fee since they are "A" shares. My question is if I do either one of these moves and then sell them in less than a year do they still qualify for long term capital gains, or would I be stuck paying for short term capital gains? Is there a certain grace period I have for making moves such as this?

Thanks,
Sue
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Author: pmarti Big funky green star, 20000 posts Home Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 27254 of 121189
Subject: Re: an inheritance question Date: 2/4/2000 9:46 PM
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<< I inherited some shares of the Franklin Oregon tax-free income fund that were in my mother's account for more than a year. They were moved to my account the end of December, 1999. I suppose I should be changing them over to shares of Franklin California tax-free. Or I could move them into another fund in the same family and not have to pay a fee since they are "A" shares. My question is if I do either one of these moves and then sell them in less than a year do they still qualify for long term capital gains, or would I be stuck paying for short term capital gains? Is there a certain grace period I have for making moves such as this? >>

Inherited assets are always long-term, no matter how long you hold them in your name. If you sell one fund and buy another, you have a reportable Schedule D sale. You can't "trade" within a fund family without recognizing a sale.

Phil Marti
Tax Preparer

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