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Author: fredinseoul Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 5056  
Subject: An interesting article that makes me think Date: 5/6/2009 1:06 AM
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At this post, http://boards.fool.com/Message.asp?mid=27656562 , the OP has this article:
http://www.thebigmoney.com/articles/judgments/2009/05/03/end....

All these facts suddenly left the personal finance industry facing a conundrum of its own making. The backbone of the self-help complex is the idea that you can do it. You. Singular. But what happens when you lose your job and can't find a new one before your six months of recommended emergency savings runs out? Or a good chunk of your retirement income is in the form of a pension from your former employer—and that employer is named Chrysler? What then?

"Personal finance has come to substitute for the role government should play for people," observes Nan Mooney, author of (Not) Keeping Up with Our Parents. "In the past 20 years the myth of the person succeeding on their own has gotten bigger and bigger. This myth is dangerous. It tells you if you can't balance everything and you are in debt, it is your fault."


Two thoughts occur to me. First, from the second paragraph, when did the government have a role in planning my retirement? Nan Mooney's quote to me is from outer space.

Second, the idea that the personal finance industry's advice has been proven to be bogus seems true today, when I am down 40% or so in my various investments. The question arises in my mind, since their advice was seemingly wrong, am I doing the wrong thing in still following the advice?

I've kept the monthly purchases going at Vanguard and through the 401K. It has seemed an exercise in futility as the money invested contiued to drop each day. I've also got some stocks that I purchased after the first drop back in 08, they have also been down, although they have slowly inched up and am almost positive on two of the four stocks.

Is this all worth it? Can these plans work? Am I more foolish now than I was before? I find the thrust of the article to be a very valid question, and wonder if I should be so confident that it is still a good approach.

Anyway, musings on a Wednesday afternoon in Korea.

fredinseoul
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