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Author: crocket838 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 193219  
Subject: And on another note... Date: 9/25/2012 7:19 PM
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I was "waxing nostalgic" on facebook the other day (waxing nostalic? is that right?) and I got to thinking.

I was hungry and didn't know what I wanted to eat. There was a very small piece of chicken (boneless/skinless) in the fridge and a small container of gravy. I had the chicken and poured the gravy over bread......gravy bread....something I grew up with.

But that brought back other memories.

I remember my dad having bread and milk for a meal. Sometimes, it included side meat (bacon). I also ate this and didn't think anything of it.

We are chidlren of chidlren of the depression, did your parents have something like this? I asked this questions to my cousins and I got a lot or responses, not all from family, just ask one our boomers. :)

What was a "depression era" meal that your parents might have had?

Crocket
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Author: GrandpaRalph Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 190834 of 193219
Subject: Re: And on another note... Date: 9/25/2012 7:44 PM
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What was a "depression era" meal that your parents might have had?

Not exactly in the "meal" category, but I remember my dad talking about Christmas gifts. An orange and maybe a few walnuts in the stocking. And they were happy to get such a treat.

Ralph

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Author: RainyDayWoman Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 190835 of 193219
Subject: Re: And on another note... Date: 9/25/2012 8:30 PM
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Navy beans and cornbread. With ketchup on the beans. But then my dad thought ketchup was one of the major food groups.

Maybe because we were a Navy family our version of gravy bread was "sh!t on a shingle" which was gravy made with chipped beef, over bread. Wow, I'd forgotten about that.

RDW

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Author: Professor9 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 190837 of 193219
Subject: Re: And on another note... Date: 9/26/2012 6:18 PM
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We are chidlren of chidlren of the depression, did your parents have something like this? I asked this questions to my cousins and I got a lot or responses, not all from family, just ask one our boomers. :)

That would be me. :-) If it weren't for countless loaves of white bread my brothers and I would have starved in my growing-up home. I still remember our mother sending us a note when they farmed us out to my aunt and uncle's place for a few weeks one summer marveling that they got to the bottom of the bread wrapper and found some moldy pieces. First time ever.

What was a "depression era" meal that your parents might have had?

I don't know if they truly qualify, but we also routinely had rice with milk, sugar, cinnamon and sometimes raisins as a breakfast cereal.

Also, we'd sometimes have a fried egg sandwich, which I used to think a bit odd until I encountered my first Egg McMuffin.

We always knew the wolf was at the door when mother would brew up the dreaded pot of pinto beans or even worse, the lettuce wedge drizzled with "secret sauce." Ugh!

Prof

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Author: crocket838 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 190838 of 193219
Subject: Re: And on another note... Date: 9/26/2012 6:46 PM
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Maybe because we were a Navy family our version of gravy bread was "sh!t on a shingle" which was gravy made with chipped beef, over bread.

Had that too, growing up. Still do...every once in a while. Also had it in the Air Force.

Crocket

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Author: aurelutra2 Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 190839 of 193219
Subject: Re: And on another note... Date: 9/26/2012 7:24 PM
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My great-aunt and grandmother spoke of having nothing to eat but popcorn for a matter of weeks. They would pop it, put the bowl on the table and have a couple of handfuls when they were hungry. (No, no butter)

I remember, from my own childhood after WWII, that butter either was not available or too expensive. In any case we had Oleo. It came very white in a wrapper with a capsule that would add the buttery color when you mixed it in.
My Dad was "assigned" by Mom to do the mixing. One time he threw the package at the ceiling to break the capsule. Much of the oleo stuck to the ceiling.

A/L

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Author: SirYoda Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 190840 of 193219
Subject: Re: And on another note... Date: 9/26/2012 8:12 PM
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Had that too, growing up. Still do...every once in a while. Also had it in the Air Force.
---------------------

You can still get SoS in any chow hall in the military, as far as I know!

Yoda

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Author: BobSch Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 190841 of 193219
Subject: Re: And on another note... Date: 9/26/2012 8:25 PM
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It came very white in a wrapper with a capsule that would add the buttery color when you mixed it in.

You must have grown up in a dairy state. I remember it as a kid in Minnesota and know Wisconsin also had a law about it.

Bob

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Author: chkNYC Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 190842 of 193219
Subject: Re: And on another note... Date: 9/26/2012 8:46 PM
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butter either was not available or too expensive. In any case we had Oleo

Oleo is, I think, a form of margarine. We grew up using Nucoa, a margarine but there was often a small amount of real butter in the fridge which only Dad was allowed to use.

As far as "depression era" food, my father's mother owned a restaurant (which became a speakeasy during Prohibition and yes, they made bathtub gin). So food was never an issue for his family back then.

But when I was growing up, things were tight. We had a lot of soups and stews - often with very little meat. When I was about 8, my dad's union went on strike and it lasted a very long time. During that summer we ate a lot of "salads" for dinner - cucumbers, lettuce, a small amount of tomatoes and either a can of tuna or occasionally a can of salmon and sometimes just a couple of hardboiled eggs. As we had no A/C, my sister and I were quite happy with a cold dinner. It wasn't until years later that we realized that money was so tight during that strike that this was the best Mom could do.

Growing up, we almost never had the more expensive cuts of meat -- I don't think I ever saw any kind of steak at home until I was in my teens. Lots of chicken, though - bought fresh at the chicken market. And on Sundays there was always a roast of some kind -- often chicken. On holidays, the table was full of meats and other stuff that we seldom saw otherwise.

Never realized until years later how tight things were back then.

Maybe that's one of the reasons that I'm still very frugal today!

Christina

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Author: malaoshi Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 190844 of 193219
Subject: Re: And on another note... Date: 9/27/2012 8:03 PM
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YOu all had a different world. ....

In New Zealand we were loaded with meat and eggs, veggies,cheese and fruit..until my father, more aware of the war than others, said we had to try to live on an English ration allowance to understand other people in the world.
One tiny pat of butter each for the week? One egg? Only stuff from the veggie garden?
What was the man thinking?

We moaned and groaned for two months...(well, my baby brother didn't)...and then life reverted to our "norm"...

But we didn't have chicken... a huge treat,till I was about 10 years old. We had to go out to a chicken farm to get one, as a special treat on Sundays....one chicken between 8 people, but what a luxury!

Big Momma

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Author: Howie52 Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 190848 of 193219
Subject: Re: And on another note... Date: 9/28/2012 10:23 PM
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"What was a "depression era" meal that your parents might have had?

Crocket"

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Boiled potatoes with string beans - with a small piece of pork for flavor.

Bean soup.

Gravy over bread.

Howie52

My college days included mayo and pepper sandwiches.

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Author: TMFPMarti Big funky green star, 20000 posts Home Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 190849 of 193219
Subject: Re: And on another note... Date: 9/28/2012 11:57 PM
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Boiled potatoes with string beans - with a small piece of pork for flavor.

Bean soup.

Gravy over bread.


Funny, but those aren't poor people's food to me, they're two seasonal harbingers and one just plain good eats. My rite of Spring is a pot of potatoes and green beans, and as soon as the air turns crisp in the fall it's time for bean soup. As for bread and gravy, how can anyone not like that any time?

Phil
Rule Your Retirement Home Fool

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Author: Howie52 Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 190850 of 193219
Subject: Re: And on another note... Date: 9/29/2012 7:29 AM
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" As for bread and gravy, how can anyone not like that any time?"

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Tends to be bland if there are no drippings to add the flavor.
A blend of flour and milk tends to leave one wanting something.

Howie52
Now sausage gravy or chicken gravy goes a long way to adding that little
bit o zest.

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Author: TMFPMarti Big funky green star, 20000 posts Home Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 190852 of 193219
Subject: Re: And on another note... Date: 9/29/2012 7:33 AM
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Tends to be bland if there are no drippings to add the flavor.

In Kansas it wouldn't be gravy without drippings. That's white sauce. Although, a pinch of nutmeg, perhaps some cheese.... 'Scuse me. I may have to go do some experimenting.

Phil
Rule Your Retirement Home Fool

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Author: chkNYC Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 190853 of 193219
Subject: Re: And on another note... Date: 9/29/2012 10:45 AM
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In Kansas it wouldn't be gravy without drippings. That's white sauce. Although, a pinch of nutmeg, perhaps some cheese...

A pinch of nutmeg and some cheese turns white sauce into a cheese sauce, as you know.

When I've had no meat or drippings, I've turned white sauce into gravy using GravyMaster. Not the best tasting stuff but it looks good!

BTW - when my Dad's union was on strike (and we ate a lot of salads, as I mentioned earlier), on a Friday evening Mom would occasionally make a "special meal" for us: french fries AND mashed potatoes with sour cream. Yep, an all-potato meal. My sister and I were quite happy with that.

(And for some reason, it was ONLY on Fridays - maybe that's when money for food for the week ran out.)

Christina

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Author: TMFPMarti Big funky green star, 20000 posts Home Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 190855 of 193219
Subject: Re: And on another note... Date: 9/29/2012 11:54 AM
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I've turned white sauce into gravy using GravyMaster.

My mother used BV to "beef up" things. Much better than either Gravy Master or Kitchen Bouquet (I've used all three), but I've never seen BV anywhere but Kansas. The Cook's Country people chose Better than Boullion in their taste test, and I like it better than anything else I can find around here. Be careful not to salt until after you've added it though.

Phil
Rule Your Retirement Home Fool

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Author: chkNYC Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 190857 of 193219
Subject: Re: And on another note... Date: 9/29/2012 12:11 PM
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Be careful not to salt until after you've added it though.

First of all, what is "BV"?

I've also used boullion in the past but it used to have way too much sodium in it for me. (I know that most companies now make no- or low-sodium versions.) Plus the taste just isn't quite right.

And I would imagine that "BV" also has a lot of sodium. (I use No-Sol instead of salt in order to reduce my sodium intake.)

Christina, who has a pot of turkey stock on the stove right now

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Author: TMFPMarti Big funky green star, 20000 posts Home Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 190860 of 193219
Subject: Re: And on another note... Date: 9/29/2012 12:54 PM
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First of all, what is "BV"?

A brand name for a "beef concentrate."

Phil
Rule Your Retirement Home Fool

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Author: chkNYC Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 190861 of 193219
Subject: Re: And on another note... Date: 9/29/2012 1:08 PM
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A brand name for a "beef concentrate."

Thanks. Don't think I've ever seen that here in NY, NJ or PA.

Christina

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Author: crocket838 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 190863 of 193219
Subject: Re: And on another note... Date: 9/29/2012 6:51 PM
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(And for some reason, it was ONLY on Fridays - maybe that's when money for food for the week ran out.)

Christina


My memory is fuzzy. Weren't you raised Catholic? Waaay back then, there was no meat on Friday.

Crocket

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Author: TMFPMarti Big funky green star, 20000 posts Home Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 190864 of 193219
Subject: Re: And on another note... Date: 9/29/2012 7:04 PM
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Weren't you raised Catholic? Waaay back then, there was no meat on Friday.

Hey, she's not THAT old. Well, sure, old enough to remember meatless Friday, but still....

However, I can top it. My mother was raised Catholic but left the church in 1940. Still, when I was growing up in the 50's, it was always fish on Fridays.

Old habits die hard.

Phil
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Author: chkNYC Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 190865 of 193219
Subject: Re: And on another note... Date: 9/29/2012 7:25 PM
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Weren't you raised Catholic? Waaay back then, there was no meat on Friday.

That's right. However, as I said in my earlier post (which perhaps you missed), when Dad's union was on strike, we ate a lot of salads, sometimes with a can of tuna or salmon (both of which would have been permitted on a meatless Friday). However, Mom made these "special meals" (of all potatoes) only on Fridays.

Christina

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Author: chkNYC Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 190866 of 193219
Subject: Re: And on another note... Date: 9/29/2012 7:32 PM
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Hey, she's not THAT old

Thanks, Phil, but yes, I am. Meatless Fridays were still de rigueur when I was a youngster. (We celebrated when that was no longer the case.)

My mother was raised Catholic but left the church in 1940. Still, when I was growing up in the 50's, it was always fish on Fridays.

I can top that. Apparently, back in the old days, during Lent both Fridays and Wednesdays were meatless days. But I'm not sure if that is just a tradition that my mother's family kept. However, when I was growing up, Mom did not serve meat on Wednesdays or Fridays during Lent. BTW - Mom "left the church" when her mother died - which was the same year I was born. But she still followed most of the "rules".

Christina

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Author: BobSch Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 190867 of 193219
Subject: Re: And on another note... Date: 9/29/2012 7:57 PM
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Not a "depression era" story, but when my brother and I were growing up my dad refused to eat Spam. Apparently the rations during WWII gave him enough for a lifetime.

Bob

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Author: TMFPMarti Big funky green star, 20000 posts Home Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 190868 of 193219
Subject: Re: And on another note... Date: 9/30/2012 1:55 AM
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Not a "depression era" story, but when my brother and I were growing up my dad refused to eat Spam.

For my first boss in Washington it was chicken a la king, which he'd gotten sick of in Vietnam.

Phil
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Author: Howie52 Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 190869 of 193219
Subject: Re: And on another note... Date: 9/30/2012 12:13 PM
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"chicken a la king"

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Mix a can of Swanson chicken a la King and a can of Campbell
cream of celery (cream of mushroom works too but there are one or
two family members who have an excessive "ick" factor regarding
mushrooms) and serve over bread - toast if your being fancy - and
biscuits if there is company and you've got a meal.

can a small can of peas if you want to add veggies.

Howie52
And yes, remove the contents from the cans.
Makes it easy to stir.

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Author: chkNYC Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 190870 of 193219
Subject: Re: And on another note... Date: 9/30/2012 12:25 PM
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my dad refused to eat Spam.

My ON's wife's cousin (who is from Hawaii) is staying with them here in NY.

ON was somewhat surprised when his wife asked her cousin if there was anything in particular he would like to eat. He asked for Spam; apparently it's a favorite of many Hawaiians and is served at various meals.

Christina

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Author: SirYoda Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 190871 of 193219
Subject: Re: And on another note... Date: 9/30/2012 1:37 PM
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He asked for Spam; apparently it's a favorite of many Hawaiians and is served at various meals.
---------------

Hawaii has the highest per capita consumption of Spam in the US:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spam

Yoda

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Author: chkNYC Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 190872 of 193219
Subject: Re: And on another note... Date: 9/30/2012 2:28 PM
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Thanks for the link, Yoda.

The introduction of Spam to Hawaiians by US military makes sense to me but "Hawaiian Steak" still kind of puzzles me as does the fact that it's on both MacD's and Burger King's menus AND Hawaiians also make a dish with it using rice and seaweed!!!

Christina

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Author: Howie52 Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 190874 of 193219
Subject: Re: And on another note... Date: 9/30/2012 8:31 PM
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" highest per capita consumption of Spam"

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

have you seen the price of ham recently?

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