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Author: voelkels Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 55906  
Subject: Re: Corn grits/Polenta Date: 2/27/2013 6:47 AM
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Any suggestions on variations to make to that basic recipe?

Lots of them. Use butter or bacon grease instead of olive oil and add shredded cheese & fat when its cooked. Also add cooked crumbled bacon/sausage, tasso, etc. about halfway through the cookin. I usually cook the “quick grits” on the stove when I makes shrimp & grits.

I grew up in the 50s & 40s in New Jersey eating “Philadelphia Scrapple” many mornings. Most every supermarket had pound blocks of the stuff next to the “pork roll” (See; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pork_roll ) & eggs near the “dairy case” , neither of which I can find down here in S.E. Loosiana (and would give my doctor a heart attack if she knew I was eating them, her).

I have a number of recipes for scrapple such as;
Scrapple

I originally got this from r.f.c. five years ago. I have since deleted the info so I don't know who posted it originally. My summer savory is taking off now, so I will be makeing a batch of this very soon. I have made this for the last four years and it is great. I hope you like it.

Here is a family recipe for the type of scrapple made in Pennsylvania. It was not written down until a couple years ago when my mother was again preparing her annual batch. Last year, I made a batch from these directions and have added the notes in ( ). The key is being sure that you have a whole fresh pork shoulder as there has to be bone in order to get a proper broth. The ham hocks also add to this. I had some leftover liquid which promptly jelled when cooled. Good luck.

SCRAPPLE

4  6 lb. fresh pork shoulder (chicken parts or whole chickens if you wish)
3 ham hocks (add extra chicken pieces and/or bones you may be keeping in your freezer for stock)
1 clove garlic
1 small onion chopped
1 cup flour
2  3 lbs white corn meal
salt
pepper
summer savory
thyme

Simmer meat covered with water, garlic, and onion. Remove the garlic after the mixture has boiled a few minutes. Remove from heat when the meat begins to fall away from the bones. Cool, remove all bones, skin and grizzle. Approx. 4 hours.

Strain liquid. (Approx. 2  1/2 qts.)
Shred meat and combine with a modest amount of fat (1/2 cup) skimmed from the liquid and reserved liquid to simmer. (It is a good idea to hold out some liquid) Bring to a simmer, add salt, pepper, summer savory, and thyme to taste. (1/4 tsp. salt, 1/4 tsp. pepper, 2 tsp. summer savory, 1 tsp. thyme) Be sure that there is enough liquid to accept white corn meal in sufficient quantity to adhere the meat together. Add liquid from reserve. Mix in flour. (Becomes as thick as gravy.) Begin adding and stirring in corn meal until quite thick. (Gets so thick that it is difficult to stir with heavy spoon. Similar to pie crust but not quite as thick.)

Spread in loaf pan. Refrigerate, or freeze. Slice and brown in frying pan.

Philadelphia Scrapple

2 lbs. pork shoulder 5 cups water
1 onion, sliced 1 small bay leaf
1 cup white cornmeal 2 tsp. salt
1/4 cup minced onion 1/4 tsp. thyme
1 tsp. sage 1/4 tsp. pepper
Flour Shortening

Combine pork, 1 quart of water, onion slices and bay leaf in saucepan. Cover and simmer 1 hour. Drain pork and reserve broth. Discard bones and chop meat fine. Mix cornmeal, 1 cup water, salt and 2 cups reserved broth in a saucepan. Cook, stirring, until thick. Stir in meat, minced onion, thyme, sage and pepper. Cover and simmer 1 hour. Pour into a 9 x 5 loaf pan and chill until firm. Cut into slices, dust lightly with flour and fry in heated shortening until browned on both sides. Serve at once. Makes about 6 servings.

Scrapple

Info: from Early American Recipes collection, 1953, by Heloise Frost

Ingredients:

3 lb lean, bony pork
2 qt water
2 c cornmeal
2 t salt
11/2 t black pepper
2 t sage
1 t savory

Preparation:

Cook the pork slowly until it falls apart. Set aside to cool. When cool, pick meat from the bones, discarding all gristle and fat. Skim fat from the broth and cook it down to 1 quart. Grind the meat fine. Add salt to the broth and bring to a rolling boil. Sprinkle the cornmeal over the boiling broth by handfuls, stirring constantly. Cook 510 minutes, then add the meat and seasonings
and work them thoroughly into the cornmeal. Continue to cook over VERY low heat about 20 minutes. Them mould in a dish rinsed in cold water. Chill.

Slice and fry crisp and brown.

Oatmeal Scrapple

3 lbs pork, leftover scraps, or neck bones (A shoulder is good)
2 med onions, chopped fine
3 quarts stock or water
Salt and Pepper to Taste
1/2 tsp. each nutmeg and allspice
4 Tbsp. Summer savory or 6 Tbsp. Sage
18 oz non instant rolled oats
Veal Neck Bones (optional for richer stock)

Scrub bones or shoulder well and simmer all day in a large pot covered with water. Let boiled meat cool in the pot overnight and into the next afternoon. Then pick the meat from the bones and run it through a meat grinder. Chop onions fine and cook in stock until tender. Then add the ground pork and seasonings. Add rolled oats. Boil until oatmeal and Pork are done. (15 min. or so). Let cool and pour into loaf pans. Cool completely and wrap in foil and refrigerate or freeze. Slice about 1/2 inch thick and fry on greased iron griddle until browned on both sides.

======

SCRAPPLE

4  6 lb. fresh pork shoulder
3 ham hocks
1 clove garlic
1 small onion chopped
1 cup flour
2  3 lbs white corn meal
salt
pepper
summer savory
thyme

Simmer meat covered with water, garlic, and onion. Remove the garlic after the mixture has boiled a few minutes. Remove from heat when the meat begins to fall away from the bones. Cool, remove all bones, skin and grizzle. Approx. 4 hours.
Strain liquid. (Approx. 2  1/2 qts.) Shred meat and combine with a modest amount of fat (1/2 cup) skimmed from the liquid and reserved liquid to simmer. (It is a good idea to hold out some liquid) Bring to a simmer, add salt, pepper, summer savory, and thyme to taste. (1/4 tsp. salt, 1/4 tsp. pepper, 2 tsp. summer savory, 1 tsp. thyme)

Be sure that there is enough liquid to accept white corn meal in sufficient quantity to adhere the meat together. Add liquid from reserve.

Mix in flour. (Becomes as thick as gravy.)

Begin adding and stirring in corn meal until quite thick. (Gets
so thick that it is difficult to stir with heavy spoon. Similar
to pie crust but not quite as thick.)

Spread in loaf pan. Refrigerate, or freeze.

Slice and brown in frying pan.

======

Scrapple Croquettes
Serving; 34

1 cup scrapple salt, pepper
1 cup cooked brown rice or mashes potatoes
1 egg beaten 2 eggs hard boiled
1/2 cup wholewheat bread crumbs
1 tsp minced parsley

Mix the scrapple, the rice or potatoes, and the hardboiled eggs,
chopped fine. Season with parsley, salt, and pepper. Shape into
croquettes with beaten egg and bread crumbs; fry in deep fat.

But none of them have the exact taste of the commercial products, which probably contain pig liver & other organ meats.
;-(

C.J.V. - I have a problem finding fresh pig liver around here, me
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