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I just bought some 5" pie tins that are 2" deep with the intention of using them to make individual pumpkin pies for Thanksgiving, and maybe freeze some for later as DH likes pumpkin pie, and I don't care for it. Has anyone baked mini pies before? I'm trying to figure out how long I should cook them. I could try starting at about 30 minutes, and checking from time to time, but if anyone has any experience doing this, I'd love to know how it worked out and how long to cook them.
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I make 'crustless' pumpkin pies in custard cups. I'd say about 30 min is correct for those. The usual, knife inserted in the center comes out clean, test works for those.

If you have a crust involved, you might want to prebake that or it could come out underbaked.

Good luck!

Teri

(turns out no one here, except me, likes crust.)
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I make single tarts using a pot pie pan--here's the recipe. It calls for baking 30-35 minutes.

Gluten Free Apple Pie

Mix:

1/2 c. GF all purpose flour--I used Better Batter
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 tsp sugar

Add:

1TB butter, melted
1 TB. oil
1/4 tsp. vinegar
~2 to 3 TB cold water (enough so the dough forms a ball)

Divide in 2 balls--one piece should be somewhat bigger than the other. Roll each ball between 2 sheets of waxed paper so that it forms a circle. No need for extra flour if using GF flour when rolling out the dough, btw.

Place the larger rolled-out circle into a small (pot-pie sized) pie pan that's been sprayed. (The one I used was 4 or 5 inches across I'd say, but fairly deep).

Fill with prepared pie filling or the following mixture:

1 large apple, peeled and sliced
2-3 tsp Better Batter flour
1 tsp sugar
cinnamon--to taste (the more the better imo)
dash nutmeg if desired

Top with second circle of dough, pinching edges together. Sprinkle with a little more sugar or cinnamon-sugar (~1/2 tsp) Bake approx 30-35 minutes at 350 or until crust is lightly golden and filling softens. Don't overbake.
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I make single tarts using a pot pie pan

What size is a pot pie pan? I've not heard of that.
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They are known as pot pie or tart pans--5" in diameter:

http://www.kitchendance.com/foiltartpans1.html

(btw, I got a 6-pack of Handi-Foil Eco Foil pot pie pans (5" diameter) with lids at my grocery store).
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and the depth is 1 5/8"
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(turns out no one here, except me, likes crust.)

I am.....lost for words! Pies need wonderful fillings, but a good crust and good crumb toppings are a many-layered pleasure all their own. How can anyone not like crust!


sheila
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Pies need wonderful fillings, but a good crust and good crumb toppings are a many-layered pleasure all their own. How can anyone not like crust!


Yeah I was a little slow on the uptake...you would think scraping plates containing lovely piecrusts missing their filling would have given me a clue. And, yes, I make a great piecrust!

Even quiche around here - either crustless or with a flour tortilla on the bottom for easy serving. I think empty quiche crusts finally caught my attention.

shrug.

whose kids are these?!!! Evidently DH's.

Teri
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whose kids are these?!!! Evidently DH's.

My kids even loved the dough raw. When I'd bake, they'd clamor to have the leftover pieces that didn't make it into the oven.


sheila
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Alright....I'll come clean on this topic. I don't like crust either....although I have learned to appreciate it more as I've grown older--and am now able to discern between a good crust (flaky, not greasy) and a no-so-good one (tough and burnt).

I think the trouble started when my father would bring home pies from a major area pie bakery (which supplied restaurants, hotels, grocery stores). The crust was always burnt along the top edges. Always. Almost black--but the fillings were simply incredible. I think I just automatically associated pie crust with that bitter burnt flavor that ruined the taste. Besides the filling is where most of the pie's flavor is. Sooo...I always would leave the crust on my plate. Only ate the filling. It's only within the last few years I've been brave enough to eat the crust too.
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My neighbor gave me a bag full of apples from his tree, so in thanks I made some of these pies without a crust. They are alot easier than they appear, and really look impressive. On top of it all, they taste like apple pie AND baked apples.

http://domesticdilettante.com/2012/01/11/applepie/
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