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Author: eudaimon6 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 71108  
Subject: Re: Supreme Car Inspection Date: 10/12/2004 9:33 PM
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Applications are electronically transmitted to Ford Motor Credit through a system called "Creditweb"

If I know, or strongly suspect, that a deal is going to Ford Motor Credit, I won't pull my own bureau, since through Creditweb I can see the same bureau that Ford pulls. Saves my company a couple bucks, and its the same bureau. So the dealership may not have inquired at all-they just transmitted tha app to Ford and looked at your bureau on the internet.


In order for FMCC ever to have approved your loan, they would have had to pull your credit report. Since there is only one inquiry around the time you purchased the car, it must have been Fords. So the application was submitted.

Here's a scenario that happens regularly.

Business manager takes app, transmits it to Ford, asking to borrow 18,000 for 60 months with a payment of $360. Ford's creditweb computer scores the app at a level 2, and the business manager delivers the car, knowing the deal is not approved, but likely will be. Ford has six credit tiers-0,1,2,3,4,5. Level 2 is the equivalent of a B+.

The next morning, the Ford Credit analyst looks at the deal, verifies employment, income, etc. Says, "I'd really like the customer to put down $1000. So he notes in Creditweb that the deal is qualified with $1000 down. The analyst might think the advance is too high on the deal, may be afraid the customer cant afford the payment, whatever.

So the Business Manager calls the customer back in and works the customer for the down payment. Customer balks, and says "you can have your car back if we can't keep the deal as I signed it" So Business Manager goes one up the ladder, maybe the General Manager calls the Loan Analyst's boss, whatever. And the deal is approved as called. Happens all the time-a big part of a Business Manager's job is in selling paper. Sometimes its harder than others.

I guarantee you that I want all my deals approved and my contracts cashed. The dealership where I work has a Chief Financial Officer who tracks every contract every business manager writes and knows average turn time-number of days from signing to cash in the dealership's account. I don't want anything in my office for three days, because I don't want to hear about it in my reviews.
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