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My 2008 Toyota Highlander has been driven almost 100k miles. In that time, I've done oil changes, oil and air filter changes, new tires and new battery. There were also a few recalls. Other than that, there has not been any other work done to it. It still has all the other original fluids and even the original brakes. So I'm looking to get another 100k miles out of the vehicle so some additional maintenance needs to be done. Based on the service manual, the only fluid other than oil that needs to be changed is the coolant. All of the other fluids don't have any maintenance intervals listed in the manual anywhere. All of them are listed under inspect. I'm going to drop it at my mechanic for his inspection and recommendations. Here is a list I put together as possible maintenance items that may need done.

coolant
automatic transmission fluid
transfer case oil
differential oil
radiator hose
thermostat
serpentine belt
front and rear brakes
brake fluid
water pump

According to the manual, the coolant needs done. I'm also pretty sure the brakes will need done. I may as well replace the brake fluid during the brake repair. The dealer wanted to do them 5000 miles ago. Since the coolant is being done, I'm wondering if the thermostat should be replaced. It is one of the few things under the hood that has almost stranded me on other vehicles. The next coolant change would be 50k miles. Also I may want to change the radiator hoses during the coolant change.

As for the other fluids, I'm just not sure. Visually, they look fine. I don't know if some are synthetic or not. I may lean towards swapping it out since I want another 100k miles.

The serpentine belt looks fine right now. I don't see any obvious cracking. If it is recommended to be changed, I'm wondering if I should go ahead and replace the water pump. I often see that as a recommendation when replacing the belt.

Other maintenance items?

PSU
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The serpentine belt looks fine right now. I don't see any obvious cracking. If it is recommended to be changed, I'm wondering if I should go ahead and replace the water pump. I often see that as a recommendation when replacing the belt.

That's when replacing the timing belt, not the serpentine/accessory belt. You have to open up the engine to get the timing belt, so it makes sense to replace the inexpensive water pump while you're in there. And at 100k, you're probably due for a timing belt, if you haven't done it already.

I wouldn't bother with the serpentine belt unless it's clearly deteriorating or starts slipping/squealing. Same for the radiator hose.

As for ATF, if you haven't changed it up to now, the general advice is that changing it now may actually be more likely to cause problems.
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I wouldn't bother with the serpentine belt unless it's clearly deteriorating or starts slipping/squealing.

Unless you have to remove the serpentine belt to replace the timing belt. I wouldn't put one with 100k miles back on once it's off for some other reason. May as well spend the few bucks to put a new one on instead.

--Peter
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It has a timing chain, not timing belt.

As for ATF, if you haven't changed it up to now, the general advice is that changing it now may actually be more likely to cause problems.

I know some people follow that advice but I don't. The AFT fluid is still bright red and there are not any transmission problems. I don't see where leaving old fluid in a transmission aids the longevity of a transmission.
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Power steering fluid, inspect/re-pack the wheel bearings, O2 sensors, and spark plugs. Also check shocks to ensure they are not leaking and possibly replace depening on how the car was driven.

Sam
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As for ATF, if you haven't changed it up to now, the general advice is that changing it now may actually be more likely to cause problems.

I know some people follow that advice but I don't. The AFT fluid is still bright red and there are not any transmission problems. I don't see where leaving old fluid in a transmission aids the longevity of a transmission.


I don't either, unless the clutch friction plates are already pretty worn, which would tend to be indicated by a brown fluid. (Replacing fluid in an automatic transmission with worn friction surfaces tends to hasten failure, as the detergents in fresh fluid tends to wash away more friction surface from worn clutches.) Changing the fluid and filter in a transmission w/o worn clutch surfaces is a good idea, IMHO, as contaminants and deteriorated detergents in the aged/used fluid can cause more slippage and, therein, more premature wear of the clutch disks.

I once worked in an automatic transmission repair shop - Their extended warranty included mandatory fluid and filter (and governor, if equipped) replacement at regular/specified intervals. 2 of the shop's experienced mechanics told me not to replace fluid that evidenced "burned" clutch plates, as fresh detergents merely served to wash away little remaining clutch surface, the only case in which they recommended not changing at specified intervals.

FWIW,
Bob
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Power steering fluid, inspect/re-pack the wheel bearings, O2 sensors, and spark plugs. Also check shocks to ensure they are not leaking and possibly replace depening on how the car was driven.

I don't like to replace things that are not broken so it's one reason I'm on the fence with the thermostat and radiator hose. So as far as the O2 sensors, I don't see a reason to replace them. Unlike a busted radiator hose or stuck thermostat, a faulty O2 sensor will not leave you stranded.

The spark plugs are recommended to be changed at 125k miles.
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My recommendations:

Coolant --> regardless of owner's manual recommendation, about the only one I deviate from --> I do at 100K and then every 50K after that

ATF --> regardless of owner's manual recommendation, and I would replace the ATF filter at the same time. I now do ATF every 50K miles and filter every 100K miles, only deviate from manual if it recommends sooner. In my mind there is no such thing as "lifetime" ATF - the only "lifetime" is the life of fluid right before it has fully cooked and takes the tranny with it

Transfer case oil --> good call

Differential oil --> good call

Radiator hoses --> inspect only, replace only if needed

Thermostat --> Nah

Serpentine belt --> what does the owner's manual say, follow recommendation

Front and rear brakes --> inspect and follow recommendations

Brake fluid --> Yes, good call

Water pump --> Nah, unless your vehicle has a history of eating water pumps, they are so reliable now

===========================================

I would add to your list

Power steering fluid - if never replaces assuredly cooked by now

Fuel injection cleaning

Inspect suspension for possible strut/shock replacement, also inspect bushings and fittings --> 100K miles is a lot of road. You won't notice the slop in your suspension because it has happened so gradually. I would consider a wheel alignment (at least check alignment) if not done in the last 50K miles.

Spark plugs and wires --> check the owner's manual and follow

Cabin air filter --> if equipped - have you ever replaced it? One of the most neglected filters

Inspect HVAC system --> check AC coolant pressure and recharge if needed


All told a 100K mile service might run $1K or more depending on parts, but if you're planning a long term keep of the vehicle and gunning for 150K or 200K miles it is money very well spent.
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I don't see where leaving old fluid in a transmission aids the longevity of a transmission.

It's not the fluid.

In the old days the proper way to "flush" a tranny was drain out the fluid you could. That would be about 60% to 70% of the fluid, the rest trapped in the torque converter. You would then refill. Run the car, row through the gears, and redrain. Refill, repeat. You would do this about three times. By circulating the old fluid out of the torque converter into the new, and then draining, you would eventually get about 95% of the old out, and the last 5% was fine.

That was how it use to be done - by the book.

Now when the flush the transmission they do a high pressure flush. A machine is connected to the tranny and blasts fluid at high pressure through the system, flushing out the accumulated fluid in the torque converter. The problem is after 100K miles it also, due to the higher pressure, stirs up any crap that might be in the tranny. That crap then gets into the solenoids, gears, and other hardware. The fluid "flush" is complete, you drive off and 3,000 miles later the tranny blows up.

This is why when shops do a flush they have you sign a waiver, saying that any tranny failure post flush isn't their problem.

The hard part is finding a shop that will do the old fashioned way, and do it right.

So the issue isn't leaving the old fluid behind. The issue is the tiny metal shavings and gunk floating around after 100K miles getting forced through your tranny, jamming up the machinery and resulting in a failure.

This is why there is a school of thought that at 100K miles, forget it, don't touch it you're better off.

Here is what I believe, for what it is worth. What does the owner's manual say? If the owner's manual says you should have flushed at 50K miles - then I say leave it alone. You could do more harm then good. If the owner's manual says 100K miles or further, then you're golden, flush away. If the owner's manual says it is a sealed system that requires no fluid replacement, I call shenanigans and say flush at 100K miles.

As I noted in a previous I reply I would then flush every 50K miles, regardless of what the manual says - and I would replace the tranny filter every 100K miles. Unlike an oil filter, the tranny filter can go longer between replacements. The matrix within the filter is not as fine as the oil filter, and it is designed to catch more "big" chunks (big is relative).
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Power steering fluid - if never replaces assuredly cooked by now

Had it on my paper list. Forgot to type into post. Another fluid that doesn't have a mileage listed in the service manual. Wish they'd list a mileage instead of inspect at each service interval.

Cabin air filter --> if equipped - have you ever replaced it? One of the most neglected filters

I do it every 30k miles. One of the biggest ripoffs at the dealer. Can replace in less than 5 minutes. Don't know why they change about 1 hour labor for it.

PSU
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Here is what I believe, for what it is worth. What does the owner's manual say? If the owner's manual says you should have flushed at 50K miles - then I say leave it alone. You could do more harm then good. If the owner's manual says 100K miles or further, then you're golden, flush away. If the owner's manual says it is a sealed system that requires no fluid replacement, I call shenanigans and say flush at 100K miles.

The manual is silent with regards to mileage. It is supposed to be inspected at 30k/60k/90k. It isn't a sealed system. The only mileage recommendation in the manual is when towing.

PSU
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A machine is connected to the tranny and blasts fluid at high pressure through the system, flushing out the accumulated fluid in the torque converter. The problem is after 100K miles it also, due to the higher pressure, stirs up any crap that might be in the tranny.

Every tranny flush machine I have used is just placed in series with the transmission cooler lines and uses the transmission's own pump to pull out the new fluid from one side of the machine and fill up the other side of the machine. The only pumps on the flush machine itself are used to fill up and with new fluid and drain the old.
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I think Todd is correct about the trans flush machines. They just refill the tranny as it empties. (instead of three "drain and refills")no high pressure involved.
I would definitely do it, even at 100k.
It probably should have been done at 30/60/90k rather than inspected.
By saying to inspect it they can sell/promote the car as needing less maintenance and having a lower cost of ownership. And it may be legit to change the rec from service to inspect. The trannys are better made and the oil is better now than 30 years ago.

Otherwise I agree with Milligram and Samtheinvestor and their recommendations except I would not check the owners manual about the plugs or belt. I would just change them. Especially the plugs, soon before they get stuck and take the aluminum cylinder head's spark plug threads out with them.
And the wheel bearings are not serviceable. If they are, it is done with the brakes.
I'd like to add a fuel filter to the list.
Because.. you know.. I just like to spend money ;)

Steven
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I'd like to add a fuel filter to the list.

The fuel filter is inside the gas tank with the fuel pump. Not my favorite design. From what I read, if you are not having loss of power due to a dirty filter, then don't change it.

PSU
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The fuel filter is inside the gas tank with the fuel pump. Not my favorite design. From what I read, if you are not having loss of power due to a dirty filter, then don't change it.

PSU


Agreed - and I hate the fuel filter in the gas tank arrangement.
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Happy Balloon Day, Milli!
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Thanks! I must have missed my balloons.
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What do you spend at a closing?

Maybe you have a sufficiently significant relationship with an attorney that he doesn't bill you for his time, but those of us who don't have counsel on staff might spend three-four hundred dollars on the process you describe.
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I NEVER knowingly purchase a vehicle with important operating components installed inside a fuel tank. That is one of the items on my final purchase document that I present to the salesperson and manager before I sign the final contract.

I suppose you don't consider the fuel pump to be an "important operating component"? Because in most modern cars, it's located in the fuel tank.
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You clearly understand pro bono differently than the rest of the world.

I have no idea how accompanying you to a closing on a car deal could contribute to the public good.

If you want to say she comes along with you as a courtesy, which you return in kind, that's fine.

But it isn't pro bono.
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I NEVER knowingly purchase a vehicle with important operating components installed inside a fuel tank. That is one of the items on my final purchase document that I present to the salesperson and manager before I sign the final contract.

Did you know the fuel filter on your Mini Cooper is inside the fuel tank? I guess you can claim ignorance now.
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Did you know the fuel filter on your Mini Cooper is inside the fuel tank? I guess you can claim ignorance now.


Possible case for malpractice against the attorney!
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I done learned from this readin' that Issss needs to makes my daughter a lawyer to freebee my car buying protections later in life. Yeehaaw.
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