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Author: Goofyhoofy Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Top Recommended Fools Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 128375  
Subject: Re: Electric valves for humidifier Date: 2/10/2013 9:03 PM
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Are you talking about a little LED indicator light circuit that you tapped into? Those aren't usually 110v, are they?

Very often they are. In these two humidifiers there's no reason to step the voltage down; there's a fan and a couple of analog switches (speed: low-medium-high, and one for humidity: low-medium-high). Why add the expense of a transformer. Just use a 110v indicator light for "empty":
http://www.poolsupplyworld.com/Allied-Innovations-5-30-0006-...
http://www.ecrater.com/p/16625460/110v-ac-yellow-red-green?g...

Don't know about this particular product, but all I have seen with "fill" lights would require a small amount of water (certainly less than one fluid oz and maybe only a 0.1 Fluid Ounce) to turn off the light.

No, the switches are spring loaded. (These are big console units, remember.) In the Kenmore product it's one of those that the float pushes up against, pushes harder up against, pushes even harder up against, then suddenly it hits the tension point and releases. If the light comes on it takes about a cup of water or more to make it go off. I have defeated that with my "trickle down" system of high flow in/low flow out soda bottle so I introduce more than a cup of water at a time.

(The Bionnaire uses a rocker switch (the Kenmore is a vertical float rod with the switch in the cover) which is balanced off center. Again, when the water gets low enough it suddenly "falls over" and hits the switch which lights the light. It also takes a couple cups of water to "reset", i.e. push the rocker back over and overcome the unstable "cam" which gravity then holds in place.

In thinking about this, I'm am not so sure it is "cycles" any more. I think it might be "length of cycle", because the solenoid pulls in and then stays in for a good couple minutes while the bottle fills. In the fridge it is used to being pulling in for 15-20 seconds. Once upon a time I kept the flipper on a pinball game "active" for an entire game, except to "flip" the ball, and by the end of the game smoke was pouring out of the solenoid. I wonder if the long fill cycle is contributing to the failure of the solenoid here?

Ah well, as I say, no big deal. $20 every couple years.
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