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Author: StBridgit Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 199  
Subject: Beer & Bread Making Date: 3/6/2011 9:44 PM
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My DH has gotten into the hobby of brewing his own beer, and one of the nice side benefits is the spent grain from the beer making. This is a grain blend that is specific to the beer, which is boiled in water for a few hours and then would be tossed by most. However, if you take a bit of this spent grain and make bread with it, it is the best tasting artisanal bread you can find!

I only use 1/2 cup of the spent grain per loaf, otherwise it gets too doughy and it doesn't rise or cook properly. So far we have experimented with adding in some raw garlic, cheddar cheese, and rosemary. All have turned out extremely well. I have also made spent grain rolls. I would say the final product is every bit as good as the fancy breads for which you will pay $5-6 per loaf in the grocery store!

So if you happen to have a friend or family member who likes to brew their own beer, hit them up for some of the spent grain and you will be quite happy with the forthcoming bread products. I should also mention that you can freeze the spent grain for up to six months.

Happy baking!

StB.
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Author: PSUEngineer Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 192 of 199
Subject: Re: Beer & Bread Making Date: 3/8/2011 12:20 AM
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Does it matter what type of grain? The grain in a light pale ale is quite a bit different than in a stout or porter.

PSU

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Author: StBridgit Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 193 of 199
Subject: Re: Beer & Bread Making Date: 3/8/2011 12:24 AM
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Does it matter what type of grain? The grain in a light pale ale is quite a bit different than in a stout or porter.

No, it doesn't matter at all. The flavor will vary with the grain blend but in our experience all of them are nice.

StB.

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Author: OleDocJ Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 194 of 199
Subject: Re: Beer & Bread Making Date: 3/8/2011 5:24 AM
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I usually use about 1 lb of grains per 5 gal batch for flavoring, etc. Those are not boiled; just steeped at about 165-175*F and sparged with hot tap water.

I put them in the oven at low temp to dry overnight. After drying, they can be ground in the food processer to a coarse meal to use for baking and cooking.

I also use them for making dog food slop!!! OleLab loves them!


OleDoc

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