Message Font: Serif | Sans-Serif
 
No. of Recommendations: 0
Aetna's recent decision to cover prescriptions for Arena's Belviq is not an isolated event. Two important policy shifts at the federal level paved the way, and the policy shifts also bode well for more private insurance, Medicare and Medicaid coverage of prescription weight-loss drugs, including Belviq and Vivus, Inc.'s Qsymia. The trajectory in prescription coverage is due to a national imperative to cut massive health costs caused by obesity-related disease and disability, and the FDA's approval of Belviq and Qsymia this summer.

The full story is at: http://sandiegobiotechnology.com/topics/5566/more-insurers-o...
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
Weightloss drugs should always be viewed with a healthy dose of skepticism and a raised eyebrow imo...it's just a matter of time before there are also articles appearing about how the FDA is looking into the negative side effects, about the class action suits, etc.

Lifestyle changes are much safer.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
imo...it's just a matter of time before there are also articles appearing about how the FDA is looking into the negative side effects, about the class action suits, etc.

I agree with you there. My take on the cited article is that it's more about the investment potential of the companies that make the weight loss drugs than about the long term prospect that the drugs will be successful in helping people take the weight off and (an investor's dream) keep the weight off.

The investing question isn't whether the drug will do what it's supposed to do; it's whether a lot of it will be sold over a long enough time to realize a capital gain. I see that as a risky investment thesis. But the investment thesis looks a lot more attractive than the concept that diet, exercise, drugs, and counseling will work where diet and exercise (or possibly diet, exercise, and counseling?) have failed.

Patzer
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Then there's this spamspective..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=anwy2MPT5RE
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Then there are these little snippets from the link:

• June 27, 2012: FDA approves Arena Pharmaceutical’s Belviq, along with a reduced-calorie diet and exercise, for chronic weight management of adults with BMI of 30 or higher (or BMI of 27 or greater when the individual has a weight-related condition such as high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes or high cholesterol). It was the FDA’s first approval of a weight loss drug in 13 years.

• July 17, 2012: FDA approves Vivus’ Qsymia along with a reduced-calorie diet and exercise, for chronic weight management of adults with BMI of 30 or higher (or BMI of 27 or greater when the individual has a weight-related condition such as high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes or high cholesterol


So there's no free lunch--you have to change your lifestyle anyway--so why not just do that to begin with and skip the pills along with their no-doubt myriad of potential risks....
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
So there's no free lunch--you have to change your lifestyle anyway--so why not just do that to begin with and skip the pills along with their no-doubt myriad of potential risks....

Perhaps it's like Alli? Aimed at increasing the amount of weight lost when the person follows a reduced calorie diet? I know in the literature, they claimed something like 15% extra weight lost.

Personally, I'd rather just manage my weight through diet and exercise, but I can see how some folks could use it to help get them to their goal faster. But I remember the heart scares after the Phen-Fen debacle and weight loss drugs are definitely not for me.

LWW
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
So there's no free lunch--you have to change your lifestyle anyway--so why not just do that to begin with and skip the pills along with their no-doubt myriad of potential risks....

True up to a point.....but if it was that easy, there wouldn't be an ongoing *Fighting Fat* forum in the first place.....it'd be a *Fought and Won* collective.

WRT the weightloss drugs, though, it's a bit like everything else that folk take medication for. The trade-offs are supposed to be weighed (so to speak) ahead of time.

The BMIs mentioned in the marketing literature are bordering on pathologic WRT all the sequelae of being that overweight (yeah, I know that all those dudes on college football teams'd be in this category but everyone knows that's not representative of the demographic.....or they ought to) so, the risk:benefit decision comes down to how bad is it to be so overweight vs. the potential side effects of medication that might help someone who hasn't been able to hack it on their own.

My husband is part of the liver transplant team up here at Harvard......his take is that the next biggest demographic waiting around for someone to die and free up a liver (my words, not his!) is going to be the folk who develop a crapped out liver due to obesity related fatty liver disease. I reckon pills that work (side effects included) might be a better trade off.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I think every weightloss method has the caveat 'coupled with a reduced-calorie diet'--even lapband surgery:

Dietary Guidelines After LAP-BAND® Surgery

Understanding smart food choices.

Portion size is a major factor in your success with the LAP-BAND® System. However, the types of foods you eat can affect your weight loss as well. A healthy diet will have items from each of the following food groups. Quantities and suggested foods are listed in each group. Always talk to your doctor or dietician about your particular dietary needs.

Good Choices

Fruit and vegetables:

1 to 2 servings of fresh fruit daily
2 to 3 servings of fresh vegetables daily

Whole grains:

1 small portion of cornflakes for breakfast, or
1 to 2 slices of toasted whole wheat or rye bread each day.

If you find you have trouble with bread blocking your stomach opening, substitute other whole grains such as refined, cooked or ready-to-eat cereal, oatmeal, cream of wheat, or grits.

Protein:

2 to 4 oz of meat, fish or poultry, or one egg for additional protein
Remove all visible fat from the meat. Remove skin from poultry/fish. And cook with little/no fat — grill, steam, microwave, or boil.


Dairy:

2 cups of low-fat milk or yogurt, or 1 oz low-fat cheese (max.)

Since milk and yogurt are calories in liquid form, you might think they should be avoided. However, the calcium and protein they have makes them an important part of a healthy daily diet.

Fats:

3 to 4 teaspoons of margarine, butter or oil per day (max)
Low-fat salad dressings and mayonnaise (in moderation)


Drinks:

Unlimited zero- or low-calorie liquids per day, including:
Non-carbonated beverages
Tea or coffee (black) with low-calorie sweetener
Clear soup and broths
Water


...Not-so-good choices

Steer clear:

Some foods contain too many calories and too little nutritional value to be of any use to you with the LAP-BAND® System. Avoid foods high in sugar or fat, including:

Syrups, jams, honey
Candy, pies, cakes, biscuits
Chips, dips
High-calorie soft drinks

Some doctors suggest patients avoid carbonated drinks, as they may contribute to enlargement of the stomach pouch. Alcohol should also be consumed in moderation (one glass of wine or less per day).


http://www.lapband.com/en/live_healthy_lapband/months_beyond...

Gee--if you followed those recommendations to begin with--you wouldn't even need the lapband.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
True up to a point.....but if it was that easy, there wouldn't be an ongoing *Fighting Fat* forum in the first place.....it'd be a *Fought and Won* collective.

No one can argue with that--staying at your desirable weight requires constant vigilance (and effort of course). I guess that was one of points I was trying (perhaps unsuccessfully) to make in the Fat Determinism thread--I consider maintaining a weightloss 'dieting'. But I do agree with you Steven--it's a matter of semantics.

It's never a 'one-and-done' event--which I think many people (not on this board) but many people in general think they will go 'on a diet', lose the weight, and then don't quite 'get' that they will need to alter their eating habits permanently to be thinner permanently.

So that's why I (and others here) have said--the diet that works is the diet you can stick to.

WRT the weightloss drugs, though, it's a bit like everything else that folk take medication for. The trade-offs are supposed to be weighed (so to speak) ahead of time.

I wonder if the trade-offs are fully and accurately considered by patients (and to some extent physicians)-or are they just so much background noise--in the decision to take the magic bullet. Like those drug ads on tv that state the side effects at the very end of the commercial, but the images shown portray a far rosier outcome. I remember my grandmother's dr insisting to me 'even aspirin has side effects' when I dared mention some of the potential risks of the prescription drugs she was taking--iow, he was very dismissive. (btw--my mother and I insisted she get more tests done and most of the drugs she was on were either removed or the dosage lowered--but we literally got into a screaming match with him to even consider the possibility the symptoms she was having was even remotely connected to the pills).

So my concern is with people who do not fully understand even the known side-effects and do not consider that drug studies cannot and do not always accurately reflect the potential adverse reactions when that drug is more widely distributed. Vioxx leaps to mind, and of course phen-fen....
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I'm wondering if lapband surgery will become common to be covered under the new guidelines simply because obesity is such an issue for overall health?

Can you imagine what it would be like if your doctor just told you straight up: "You're mandated to get this surgery."

LWW
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
the folk who develop a crapped out liver due to obesity related fatty liver disease. I reckon pills that work (side effects included) might be a better trade off.

Fatty liver disease! Hadn't heard of that one - I generally get educated about diseases one at a time, whenever somebody in my family comes down with one.

The Internets says that rapid weight loss is one potential cause of fatty liver disease. So watch out, it'll get you coming and going.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
The Internets says that rapid weight loss is one potential cause of fatty liver disease

I guess it must be true, then.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
WebMD shows rapid weight loss as one of several causes of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. As well as obesity, and malnutrition.


http://www.webmd.com/hepatitis/fatty-liver-disease
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
WebMD shows rapid weight loss as one of several causes of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. As well as obesity, and malnutrition.

Indeed.....as well as "viral hepatitis".

It's the sort of internet *wisdom* that'd make any hepatologist fall about laughing (except they wouldn't be bothering to read such low rent nonsense)
Print the post Back To Top
Advertisement