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Author: agnes1938 Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 17147  
Subject: Re: Brief Thought on Bush Date: 10/2/2004 10:10 AM
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Bush doesn't reflect on his actions, he never questions his own decisions...worse he would never admit he made mistakes...in Bush world admitting mistakes is a sign of weakness, where in fact it would be a sign of strength...Being wise is being able to admit your actions were wrong.

i wrote this post some time ago:

it truly seems that the Bush administration at some
point lost all sense of objectivity. It started to
believe in its own lies....and still continues to do
so and probably will continue to do so...Many people
get married to their ideas all the way to the
grave...it takes courage to admit mistakes....

Psychologically it's well-known that decision makers
tend to seek out information that supports their
existing point of view while avoiding information that
contradicts their opinion.

I'm just reading "The Wisdom of crowds" and a section
about "groupthink".

Homogeneous groups, particularly small ones, are often
victims of what the psychologist Irving Janis called
“Groupthink”.

After a detailed study of a series of American
foreign-policy fiascos, including the Bay of Pigs
invasion and the failure to anticipate Pearl Harbour,
Janis argued that when decision-makers are too much
alike (in worldview and mind-set) they easily fall
prey to groupthink.

Homogeous groups become cohesive more easily than
diverse groups, and as they become more cohesive they
also become more dependent on the group, more
insulated from outside opinions, and therefore more
convinced that group's judgement on important issues
must be right. These kinds of groups, Janis suggested,
share an illusion of invulnerability, a willingness to
rationalize away possible counterarguments to the
group's position and a conviction that dissent is not
useful.

Janis' work suggests that the odds of a homogenous
group of people reaching a good decision are slim at
best....

Alexander
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