No. of Recommendations: 0
I'm just full of questions today!

My husband is going on a business trip in October - his first since I took control over the debt and made credit cards a no-no. What has happened in the past is he pays for all of his expenses and then is reimbursed a few weeks later. Unfortunately, the $400 efund that we started is not enough to cover the expenses.

How would you guys handle this? Should he go ahead and use a credit card? I'm concerned because I don't think that he'll get reimbursed in time to pay the balance within the same billing cycle. I don't travel for my job so I'm not sure if an employer would be willing to front money for these kinds of expenses or not.

Help?
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
The most he can do is ask at work if advances can be made.

Frankly, I've only ever worked at one company that made ME front expense money. (And only for 6 weeks. :-{))

All the other firms I've worked at have had me sign up for a Corporate American Express card. Hell, 5 years ago when I was hired at Lucent, I had my Amex card before I even had a network login -- because I was going to be travelling for training.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
Hi,

When I was traveling I sometimes had to front the money but I always did the reimbursement paperwork on the final leg home, or first thing the next day at the office. Once I turned it in, I was reimbursed on the next pay period with my regular check and had the money in plenty of time for the credit card bill.

You might want to check with the company and see exactly what the timing or process for their reimbursement practices are.

Good Luck,
MH

Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
How would you guys handle this?

He should inquire with management and make it very clear that he doesn't believe he can afford to pay the bill if it's not reimbursed by the time the bill is due.

The finance folks at my company actually suggested at one point that I get around such a policy by simply stating that I don't have a credit card suitable for travel expenses. :-)

You should not even consider using the emergency fund to make this travel possible. Better to refuse to go on the trip.

-- Mark
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 3
How would you guys handle this? Should he go ahead and use a credit card? I'm concerned because I don't think that he'll get reimbursed in time to pay the balance within the same billing cycle. I don't travel for my job so I'm not sure if an employer would be willing to front money for these kinds of expenses or not.


Chrisdotcom,

I am of the opinion that if your husband travels for business regularly, then he should have a corporate credit card to use on the business trips. One of the first things I would do is have him ask his supervisor about whether he is eligible for such a card. I would also have him ask about eligibility for travel advances. I know that when I was travelling, my company frowned up on giving travel advances, but we had corporate cards so most of the time it wasn't an issue.

If neither of those two routes will work, then I would say that you should definitely NOT use your e-fund to pay for his business trip--it is better for you to use your personal credit card than sink your e-fund in my opinion.

In any case, make sure that your husband files his expense report the instant he has all the receipts and can do so--the faster you file the report, the faster the reimbursement money comes. Further, if the company doesn't pay your husband back in time to not incur interest charges, then he should immediately file another expense report, charging the company for the interest charges on the card. I don't know if he'll get the money back, but it might send a message to somebody. :o)

d
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
A coworker of mine was in a similar situation. He ended up sending in a second expense report for the interest charged to his credit card and they reimbursed him for it.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I think it makes sense to ask an employer for a corporate card.

I'd be very cautious letting it slip that I didn't have a credit card I could use for that. People of debtedness are not a protected class under any anti-discrimination laws. If your husband is on a career path that might eventually include (or includes now) making financial decisions or having budget authority then it might be possible to save $50 in interest short term while losing thousands of dollars of lost raises from missing a promotion.

Mind you I'm not saying a company should or shouldn't consider an employee's personal finances when considering a promotion, only stating that it's bound to happen every now and then.

Michael
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
"I'd be very cautious letting it slip that I didn't have a credit card I could use for that. People of debtedness are not a protected class under any anti-discrimination laws. "

true, however some people have religious beliefs that preclude the use of debt. & that is protected ( religion )
Print the post Back To Top
Advertisement