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I have occasionally thought that moving into a continuing care retirement community would be a sensible option for us, perhaps around age 75, if we can afford it at that time (we're just 60 now). The ability to stay at the same facility while moving through independent living, assisted living, and possible skilled nursing care seems comforting.

How interesting to read that moving through changes in health status isn't as seamless as I thought:

http://newoldage.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/10/28/limited-mobili...

Have any of you thought about a CCRC or know anyone personally who lives in one?
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Have any of you thought about a CCRC or know anyone personally who lives in one?

No one close at the moment, but I've had friends and relatives move through the phases in the past. The most successful moved to the next stage before they absolutely had to.

We ran across one setup that really impressed me when we were looking at facilities my father might consider. Once you move in, you don't move again. When your need for care increases the care comes to you, up to and including full nursing. Of course it's expensive, but if resources allow, it seems to me a great approach.

Phil
Rule Your Retirement Home Fool
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<<Could C.C.R.C.’s improve the situation by promoting more interaction, with less physical and social separatism, among residents who require different levels of care?

“Independent living residents don’t like that,” Ms. Shippee pointed out. “They view themselves as healthy and active. If you try to integrate them with people in wheelchairs who have problems, they will object.”

In the dining room, she added, “they want to feel like they’re in a nice restaurant, conversing with friends; they don’t want to be faced with those in declining health.” >>


Kind of sad, but very human. We have our pride, and our fear of the future.



Seattle Pioneer
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Have any of you thought about a CCRC or know anyone personally who lives in one?

Most of these places are very expensive to enter, plus the monthly expenses can be quite high. On the other hand, if you don't have any family around to help you transition from independent to assisted to skilled nursing, then (assuming you have money) these aren't bad places. If you have family, then they can help you find and move from indepenent to assisted to skilled. By moving to different places along the way, you usually can avoid having to pay the up front enrollment charge, which can be hundreds of thousands at some CCRCs. I did this with my mother. When it came time, we found a great semi-independent living place for her, where she lived for about 5 years. We then found her an assisted care place not far away, where she ended up staying for only a short while, then we found her a memory impaired place that was the same as a skilled nursing home, only for folks with Alzheimers. She stayed there for a year until she died from cancer. The cancer was a blessing in her case, since she had become a quasi-zombie by that time. It would have cost us about $150K more to have put her in a CCRC. The monthly charges we paid were about the same as the monthly charges at a local CCRC, and the quality was the same. It took a little work on our part to locate and move her along the way, but it didn't take that much time, and the savings was substantial. At the time, we didn't know how long she would live, so we really didn't want to drop a bundle on just getting her into a CCRC. Also, the places we ended up putting her were much more convenient to where we lived, which was important given the frequency we went over there. Also, with CCRCs, you have to factor in the risk of bankrupcty or financial problems that could take the "continuing" out of "continuing care." Good luck with your choices.
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“Independent living residents don’t like that,” Ms. Shippee pointed out. “They view themselves as healthy and active. If you try to integrate them with people in wheelchairs who have problems, they will object.”

In the dining room, she added, “they want to feel like they’re in a nice restaurant, conversing with friends; they don’t want to be faced with those in declining health.”


The CCRCs I've looked at over the years all had different dinning rooms and entertainment areas. They kept the nursing home folks entirely separated from the indepenent living folks. This was because the independent living people would have left if they had to interact with the nursing home people. Moving to these places is a hard thing, but staring death in the face each time you eat a meal is more than most folks can handle, thus the reason for complete separation. They also separated the nursing inmates from the Alzheimer zombies, for obvious reasons.
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My in-laws have lived in an independent-living condo on the grounds of a CCR for 15 years and have adjusted well. FIL is more satisfied than MIL, though, I suspect. The location is far from family and she is not fond of the weather; he, OTOH, loooooves the weather. It is expensive, but if they run out of money, they will still live there even if they need hospital or nursing home care. It's all there. I think it was very thoughtful of them to do this. They said they did it so that none of the children would have the burden of caring for them.

ChiliSpouse and I likely will consider one of these in the next 20-25 years.

Chili
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Personally, my plan is to check out on a DIY basis before the dramatic final chapter has a chance to play itself out.




Seattle Pioneer
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My mother is 96 and lives in an independent living apartment in an upscale CCRC in Santa Barbara. A number of her friends have moved between independent, assisted, or nursing support living, often returning to their apartments as their conditions improve. As far as I can tell, socialization tends to continue as the person moves between levels of care. My mother cooks most of her meals, but has lunch several times a week with various groups of her friends. She prefers the dining room in the assisted living unit, because it's smaller and they have a nice fireplace. It is true that many of her friends are quite independent and resist the notion that they may need more care than they can provide for themselves.

We talk with my mother by phone daily. Once a week we take her to have her hair done -- there is a facility on site, but she prefers one off site, have lunch, and do shopping. She seems to be enjoying life.

db
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We are definitely looking at CCR places. Have actually put $1000 ( refundable any time) into being on a list for a place that isn't built yet but is local and would enable us to keep our local contacts with family, temple, musical group, physical exercise etc. However, in case it doesn't get built we are keeping our eyes open and looking around.

We don't want to be a burden to our kids or have them have to worry about our care. We are late 60s right now, and DH will continue to work as long as he is allowed to drive. (eyes= Stargaards disease)

I have forwarded your article to him, alstroemeria....

Big Momma
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I'm 73; my wife is 70. We live a block from the beach in Montecito, a small town adjacent to Santa Barbara. Up the road from us, the equivalence of a few blocks, is Casa Dorinda, the retirement community where Julia Child spent the last years of her life. It's based on an old grand estate, and has beautiful grounds. You join when your health is good, then you're taken care at a fixed price regardless of any changes in health status that may occur later on. We'll probably sign onto their waiting list for a 2 bedroom apartment in a few years.

db
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My uncle turned 90, and moved into a retirement community. They had two buildings...one a nursing home basically, and one an assisted care facilty for those who were ambulatory and could take care of their basic needs.

He sold his house (maybe $80K) and used that as the entrance fee. There is a monthly fee...that his SS takes care of. He 'bought' a one bedroom place....maid service once a week to clean up...and they do the laundry...... meals served in dining room....you get two a day.....each room has mini frig and small stove......they have pool and gym and organized activities.

He still drove, but the utilities and upkeep on the house were getting to him...and he lived in an area that was deteriorating year after year. The house needed a lot of updating..probably 90 year old house..he had been living there for 50 years....or 60 years.

He was happy with it.

Maybe 200 or more lived in the apartment type place..and another 100-200 in the nursing home facility, which he could move to.



t.
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I would be interested in knowing where this facility is located. Assuming your Uncle gets $24K from SS, if that pays for an assisted living facility costs are much lower someplace than middle Tennessee which is not exactly a high cost location for general living costs.

Gordon
Atlanta
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"I would be interested in knowing where this facility is located. Assuming your Uncle gets $24K from SS, if that pays for an assisted living facility costs are much lower someplace than middle Tennessee which is not exactly a high cost location for general living cos"

Well, he did buy in with his house money.

He gets the meals and maid service once a week or two weeks.....he still drives, but doesn't go far.

IT's in Salisbury, NC.....

It's run by some religious group....LUtherans?

t.
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Ugh, this is a depressing thread;)). I will be 74 in a few weeks. I live by myself in a big two story house with five acres and five dogs. I am quite active, dog activities, photography, walking. I would like to leave here feet first with my boots on.

We do have an upscale community in my town. And they do allow a dog, on the first floor or in one of the separate Villas if you can even get one of those. And I think maybe I "could" possibly consider a Villa. This community is owned by Catholic Health Care Partners. The place is really lovely, but I am not a "people" person, and I am quite independent. So I wonder how well I would fit in to a place like that. And just the thought of moving out of my house, with all my accumulated stuff is too overwhelming.

Actually, I am getting ready to re-carpet my house, get a new TV. So I think I will stay for a while.

Birgit
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Ugh, this is a depressing thread;)). I will be 74 in a few weeks. I live by myself in a big two story house with five acres and five dogs. I am quite active, dog activities, photography, walking. I would like to leave here feet first with my boots on.

Nice death if you can get it. Sounds much like my maternal grandmother, except with much nicer trappings. My aunt found her dead on the chamber pot from a heart attack or stroke when she went to take her shopping. She'd been digging potatoes the day before.

I would be a good idea, though, to have a backup plan in case of a debilitating incident that doesn't kill you. If you think this discussion is depressing, imagine that situation.

Phil
Rule Your Retirement Home Fool
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Hey Birgit,

I'm 19 yrs younger than you and I'm thinking about my future. I have a nice house, the only one I've ever lived in, a tri level with almost a acre with two doggies and 3 outdoor kitties. The property and house is a lot to keep up with, labor wise and money wise and the lack of a first floor bathroom is a pain in the butt or more accurately, my knees when they're inflamed. :)

Some of the CCR's around here are high dollar but they do appeal to my sense of security though as I age and deteriote both physically and mentally. Not much family and I wouldn't and couldn't count on him anyway for anything, so basically I'm alone. I need to get more info about the other CCR's in the area or outside the area to see what might fit my lifestyle and my personality. I do like my space and quiet. I like people and enjoy the stimulation they provide but as a introvert, I like time to myself to recharge. :)

I've also done alot of dog training and assisting in classes. I see your active in the dog world. Have you considered plans for any pets if you become disabled or when you die? I had a provision in my will for this woman friend of mine in the dog world that would make sure my pets are placed in a good home.

LuckyDog
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My aunt found her dead on the chamber pot from a heart attack or stroke when she went to take her shopping. She'd been digging potatoes the day before.

ROTFLOL! That's wonderful!

I do have family (two daughters and two GK) living close by. The question is, do I want to be a burden? Or do I want to spend lots of $$$$ of their inheritance money not to burden them. Choices, choices.

Birgit
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do I want to be a burden?

I got a lot of that burden nonsense from my parents during their decline. To Mom my one-word response was "diapers." She was known far and wide for recalling that her babies never had a rash. With Dad it was "college." They paid for everything my scholarship didn't, and I graduated with more money in the bank than they had. That said, of course you don't want to be a burden. That's why we make plans we hope we'll never have to implement.

My one caution on behalf of your children is that you periodically realistically assess your ability to stay where you are a year in the future. LD notes that she's seeing some physical changes. I hope you'll be one of the lucky ones, like my grandmother, who roll along great until they wake up dead. But if time takes a toll you'll do yourself and your children a great service by facing the fact and making the best lemonade you can.

Phil
Rule Your Retirement Home Fool
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I have two daughters. I am a life member of two dog clubs. There are rescue organizations in my area. I also have a codicil in my will (which I need to update with more funds)for the care of the dogs. I am no longer breeding, all the girls are neutered. Two of the dogs are older, although corgis can live a long time. But I do not see getting accepted into a retirement home with five dogs.

If I did not have my daughters (and friends), I might have a totally different outlook about my safety and security.

This is the place by me: http://www.laurellake.com/Default.htm

There is another one a bit up north that is also upscale and expensive.

Birgit
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I do have family (two daughters and two GK) living close by. The question is, do I want to be a burden? Or do I want to spend lots of $$$$ of their inheritance money not to burden them. Choices, choices.

What do they say about this? My father-in-law is currently squandering his money. He's 86 and blind, but he still manages to keep getting married. He's on number 5 now. One of his daughters, not my wife, has been wholly supported by him all of her life, and she's in her mid 50s now. She claims to be disabled. She has never worked. She's a total pain in the butt. Some years ago, we talked him into leaving all his money in trust to provide for the woman, so she wouldn't end up on our doorstep or the doorstep of the youngest sister, with the remainder going to the her sisters at her death. He agreed, but he's been blowing money faster than we thought possible, plus steering much of it towards the 5th wife, who has enough money of her own anyway. Well, life goes on. I don't know why I'm writing about this, I guess because my wife just got home from visiting him for a few days. I think we've got things planned out so we won't be a burden on our son, but then we have a good relationshipe with him and DIL. Unfortunately, my wife's family (sisters, elderly father and mother) have a miserable relationship with each other. I hate to see it, but that's the way it is, and her parents are doing everything they can to make things as bad as possible as they approach the end.
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This is the place by me: http://www.laurellake.com/Default.htm

There is another one a bit up north that is also upscale and expensive.

Birgit


That's quite a place. It looks great. Kind of large, but I guess there are economies of scale that help make things even nicer.
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wow, that looks like a nice place, all that acreage appeals to me because I love to walk especially outside in a safe area.

I don't have kids, just a few nieces and nephews. I'm leaving a little bit of money to them, nothing to my brother except $100 and house furnishings and the rest to various charities. I don't get the whole inheritance thing, as in leaving something for them that is. My main concern is having enough money to take care of my needs while I'm living.

LD
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I do have family (two daughters and two GK) living close by. The question is, do I want to be a burden? Or do I want to spend lots of $$$$ of their inheritance money not to burden them. Choices, choices.

Birgit

IMHO, it isn't their inheritance money. Yeah, I know. No one asked me. Bur really, you should not sacrifice your comfort so they can live off your money.

The CCR's I have seen start with minimum "assistance", and gradually increase as the individual's need increases. Some will never need anything. Some will need food preparation, and perhaps regular apartment cleaning. Some will need total care.

The incentive is that you make the decision yourself, while you are still in full possession of your faculties, and don't depend on your relatives to decide.

Me? I have a young wife who will take care of me (I hope. Maybe she will lock me away in a cheap nursing home.)

Count Uptoten
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ResNullis: now. One of his daughters, not my wife, has been wholly supported by him all of her life, and she's in her mid 50s now. She claims to be disabled. She has never worked. She's a total pain in the butt.

Are we married to the same woman? Actually, my SIL has had jobs, rarely for more than three months at a time, but has been "disabled" for the last two years.

I an glad to say my FIL is still with his wife. I hate to think if she dies first. He is a bit irresponsible, imo.

Some years ago, we talked him into leaving all his money in trust to provide for the woman, so she wouldn't end up on our doorstep or the doorstep of the youngest sister ...


We have had this conversation with my in-laws (Actually, the Countess has had the conversation. I am not "family". But the Countess is executrix of the will.) So far they have not seen the wisdom of this approach. My crystal ball doesn't work well, but I see the Countess keeping her sister in their declining years. The sister will contribute nothing. (Her apartment is filthy.) With any luck I will be dead. Realistically, my in-laws are only a few years older than I am, but I am in much better health. But sometimes folks croak and their friends all say, "But he never had a sick day in his life."

Count Uptotem
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I do have family (two daughters and two GK) living close by. The question is, do I want to be a burden? Or do I want to spend lots of $$$$ of their inheritance money not to burden them. Choices, choices.

Birgit


My Will will read: “Being of sound mind, I spent it all while I was alive.”

I have received several inheritances; glad for getting them, yet I wonder how much better they would have lived if they had spent it on themselves.

I am 71 and when I kick the bucket Elly gets it all and I hope she has a blast with it even to the point of boy-toys. Until then I will spend on life’s better things: like getting that Yamaha Z-11 A/V amp with HDMI to feed the present 60-in. LG plasma which has as its present feed last year’s flagship Z-9 – so passé). And I am so enjoying the new PSB S Series dipole surround speakers. I have to tell you, having 13 speakers as a base for surround is mighty nice.

Actually, I am getting ready to re-carpet my house, get a new TV. So I think I will stay for a while.

Now you’re talking. Get carpeting with the best underlay so when you walk on it barefoot your toes squish into it and you like it so much you retrace your steps. When you decide on the TV let me know and I’ll help you choose but right off I’d suggest a nice 42-in. LCD with good internal speakers – it’ll cost less than the carpeting but it’ll be nice.

Think of it this way: when the grandkids come over and they do watch TV with you you’ll have much enjoyment right now than if you left in your Will enough for them to buy a better TV.

Hedonism in the pursuit of happiness is no vice.

MichaelR
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I have two daughters. I am a life member of two dog clubs. There are rescue organizations in my area. I also have a codicil in my will (which I need to update with more funds)for the care of the dogs. I am no longer breeding, all the girls are neutered. Two of the dogs are older, although corgis can live a long time. But I do not see getting accepted into a retirement home with five dogs.

If I did not have my daughters (and friends), I might have a totally different outlook about my safety and security.

This is the place by me: http://www.laurellake.com/Default.htm

There is another one a bit up north that is also upscale and expensive.

Birgit


Can I be so forward to say that you’re 74 not 94? Those going off to retirement homes have lost faculties that enabled them to live in their own homes so count your present wealth in all those things you can do: bluntly, can you still chew a steak, keep the house up, remember to get kibble, note which plants need care, find some newspaper editorials as junky thinking, wake up in the morning with plans for the day, take the dogs for a walk, enjoy your own company sipping an aperitif while watching it snow outside, get my point?

Now, if you were old, I’d say think about an old-age home but just think about it – you aren’t one step away from packing it all in and toddling off to ‘everyone here exits feet first’. Or, another way, your most comfy chair still has a lot of miles on it. So do you.

MichaelR
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"But he never had a sick day in his life."

Keep the Faith, Cliff!

Grumpy
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Can I be so forward to say that you’re 74 not 94? Those going off to retirement homes have lost faculties that enabled them to live in their own homes so count your present wealth in all those things you can do

Now I like this advice. Yes I do have a few medical problems, but I can still ride the tractor, walk the dogs, develop websites, do photo shoots and sell pics. The new TV is here. I got a 40" Samsung that has a swivel base (So I can sit in my lounge chair), an internet card so I can join Netflix and download movies. I think it also makes my breakfast. The old 200LB Sony VEGA Trinitron is moving to the porch, but I had to buy nice Sauder TV stand that matches my porch furniture and an EdanPure heater to keep warm in the cold weather. Tomorrow night, the GS/SIL/and daughters will help to move the big beast and set up the new TV.

I also pre-ordered the new Nikon 70-200VR11 lens. A big expense, but I can sell the older lens to help defray the cost. Photography is a big hobby with me and I spend a lot of $$ on it.

Carpeting is next on the list. I have investigated a couple new cars, but that is really low on the list. I love my seven year old paid for Tank and it only has 55,000 miles on it. Right now, it's a keeper, sorry, auto dealers.

Yesterday, My 48yr old daughter mentioned (for the second time) that she could not wait for her children, ages 20 and 28, to finish schooling and move out. Then she would sell her little house and move back "home". I told her she had a long wait for those kids to leave the nest and besides, all my closets are full.

Birgit
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Can I be so forward to say that you’re 74 not 94? Those going off to retirement homes have lost faculties that enabled them to live in their own homes so count your present wealth in all those things you can do.

Now I like this advice. Yes I do have a few medical problems, but I can still ride the tractor, walk the dogs, develop websites, do photo shoots and sell pics. The new TV is here. I got a 40" Samsung that has a swivel base (So I can sit in my lounge chair), an internet card so I can join Netflix and download movies. I think it also makes my breakfast. The old 200LB Sony VEGA Trinitron is moving to the porch, but I had to buy nice Sauder TV stand that matches my porch furniture and an EdanPure heater to keep warm in the cold weather. Tomorrow night, the GS/SIL/and daughters will help to move the big beast and set up the new TV.

I also pre-ordered the new Nikon 70-200VR11 lens. A big expense, but I can sell the older lens to help defray the cost. Photography is a big hobby with me and I spend a lot of $$ on it.

Birgit


I thought the line was ‘when I get old I will wear purple’ not go out and get a photo lens to drool over. I checked with a friend who’s into photography and he said you must really know your stuff. My cameras are PHD: Push Here Dummy. Some years ago I bought a new digital camera and, a few months after buying it, took it in for something or other and was told it was obsolete. Now I learn my 35mm SLR is not only completely passé but getting the film developed is hard to come by. What is this world coming to?

You will like the 40-in. Samsung. I’d suggest getting Joe Kane’s HD Video Essentials to calibrate it so it has the picture that you, as a visual person, have a picture meeting your standards. Out of the box color, contrast and sharpness are set too high and adjusting them can get you close to 35mm quality.

MichaelR
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<<Yesterday, My 48yr old daughter mentioned (for the second time) that she could not wait for her children, ages 20 and 28, to finish schooling and move out. Then she would sell her little house and move back "home". I told her she had a long wait for those kids to leave the nest and besides, all my closets are full.>>


I'd never considered junk collecting as a defense method to keep out unneeded visitors!


My father stayed in his house too long. He was too isolated and neglected health issues.

My theory is ---- get out BEFORE you need to. My aim is to sell out and take up apartment living at about age 75 (I'm still 59 for a couple of weeks).

We;ll see how that works ----if I last that long.



Seattle Pioneer
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My theory is ---- get out BEFORE you need to. My aim is to sell out and take up apartment living at about age 75

Yeech!
No way!
I intend to die here at home. The problem with apartments is that they're not apart enough!
Now that the trees have lost their leaves, I can actually see the home down the road.
Yeech!
Too close!
http://grumpypix.multiply.com/photos/album/3#photo=425

Regards,

Grumpy
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Ugh, this is a depressing thread;)). I will be 74 in a few weeks. I live by myself in a big two story house with five acres and five dogs. I am quite active, dog activities, photography, walking. I would like to leave here feet first with my boots on.


I agree. I want to stay where I am as long as I can. My wife and I talk periodically about CCR communities. I am 72 and she is 2 years younger. We love our house, which is a two story on the coast of Northern CA, so maybe the stairs will get to us someday. In the mean time I get all the exercise I need walking my dog to the beach and up and down the stairs.

After living in a one-family house for over 40 years, the thought of living where the walls are paper thin and sharing facilities rubs me the wrong way. Of course this all depends on our health. My wife has had a hip and knee replaced, but is able to handle the stairs so far. I am in generally good health with some minor ailments. We live a relative frugal life and would like to leave our heirs some kind of legacy. However, it if it isn't in the cards that we can stay in our home because of health reasons I think we have the resources to be taken care of in relative comfort. I guess we will cross that bridge when we come to it.
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Birgit, I'm glad to see Laurel Lake is doing well now. My mother thought about buying in there when it first started. I think it had a rough time and several owners at first. One of her friends had a villa there and with the option to move through assisted living and on to nursing home care if needed, it seems to cover it all.

Ultimately Mom stayed at home and when it came time at age 90 and she could no longer live there even with a caregiver the last couple of years, I moved her to a nursing home closer to family. It was too stressful (to me) having her 800 miles away. I used to cringe at every phone call.

Now DH and I are 76 and I suppose we'll have to face something some time. Our "kids" are 500 miles away, but I don't want to move there yet. We like the weather and the taxes much better here in GA! DH's health is not good, but I'm still very active, playing golf and volunteering plus many social activities so I don't want to have to start over in a new environment yet.

Carol
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<<Ultimately Mom stayed at home and when it came time at age 90 and she could no longer live there even with a caregiver the last couple of years, I moved her to a nursing home closer to family. It was too stressful (to me) having her 800 miles away. I used to cringe at every phone call.

Now DH and I are 76 and I suppose we'll have to face something some time. Our "kids" are 500 miles away, but I don't want to move there yet. We like the weather and the taxes much better here in GA! DH's health is not good, but I'm still very active, playing golf and volunteering plus many social activities so I don't want to have to start over in a new environment yet.

Carol >>


Just keep in mind how stressful it was for you to help your mom.

Personally, I think elderly parents have a duty to consider such issues and minimize the problems they will cause their children when they can't manage for themselves any longer.

If you wind up being alone, I'd think seriously about moving within a distance that's convenient for your children to look after you. Weather and taxes are nice to consider, but avoiding unnecessary issues for your children is more important, in my view.

Do you want to put them in the position of cringing at every phone call as you did? You moved your mom close to you eventually. Wouldn't it have been more considerate had she done that move somewhat earlier?




Seattle Pioneer
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Personally, I think elderly parents have a duty to consider such issues and minimize the problems they will cause their children when they can't manage for themselves any longer.

And now for an opposing point of view.

I've known too many old people who got snatched away from their established lives and moved off someplace close to the children for the childrens' convenience only to be ignored once they got there. It's important to know the players and what you can reasonably expect from them.

It's also important to note that there's no free lunch. Before I moved to look after my parents I was talking to a friend who was caring for her parents and her widowed mother-in-law locally. For me the downside of the situation as it was then was that dreaded phone call that's already been mentioned and not being able to really do anything. The upside was that I had a life. My friend was in exactly the opposite situation.

Phil
Rule Your Retirement Home Fool
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Thank you, Phil!

I kept Mom at home as long as possible because she had lived there for 90 years and still had friends and social contact there. I moved her to my kids' city because they were there and I was also there with them a lot. My kids suggested that rather than moving her near me. They wanted to have contact with her too and knew it would help me.

She had a fall in the nursing home and broke her hip so she went down hill rather quickly after that. She was also confused about where she was, but didn't complain. She was there for a little more than four months, she died in 1996.

I hope I'll continue to be active for at least 10 more years, but I'll be making contingency plans too.

Carol
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No. of Recommendations: 4
One thing that my cousin, a teaching nurse, told me....elderly people who have lived in the same place know where they are. They know where the bank, grocery, doctor is. They know the streets they have travelled for years.

Often, when you move old people, they become confused and unable to learn their new environment and quickly go downhill.

Birgit
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No. of Recommendations: 1
"Often, when you move old people, they become confused and unable to learn their new environment and quickly go downhill.

Birgit "

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Why does this conversation sound suspiciously like moving of
prisoners between camps?

Howie52
Folks tend to go downhill quickly when the reasons for life are
lost - although this type of problem can coincide with a move, there
is not of neccessity a causation. Certainly an added stress can
influence folks and relocation can add stress. However, being
removed from people may have a greater significance than knowing
what street the laundramat is on.
Life tends to be simply complex - or complexly simple.
I tend to get them confused.
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