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Author: Windowseat Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 796  
Subject: Charting Date: 11/25/2012 11:29 AM
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I've made a good deal of progress with entering information (with pauses along the way for comments like, "look people, you have the guy being born and dying on the same day. How is it possible that none of you noticed?")

But in terms of being able to locate information quickly, I've done nothing.

My mother's pedigree charts had nice handy numbers so you knew where to go next. The charts at Ancestry don't, in great part because I can click and create a new chart. But there are times when I'm trying to figure out where a person is on the chart, and that's where I'm hesitating. I know I can find people quickly through the drop-down for finding people, but I'd like to have information so I can find where they are on the charts; the person's whereabouts in terms of grandparents and so on.

I'd been thinking of a kind of Excel chart that would like the person's name, chart number, and personal number. I'd put the chart number and so on in the person's note section, but that isn't quite what I want. Do any of you have a system that works well for you?

Nancy
Two people dying on their wedding day! Explain the seven kids they had over the next 12 years!
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Author: pauleckler Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 733 of 796
Subject: Re: Charting Date: 11/25/2012 1:58 PM
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I think it is reasonable to say no system works well in all families. Most become cumbersome at some point. But sure, sketching out family charts for several generations can at least clarify the information.

I use a system like this--

AUGUSTUS M. ECKLER--1851 (Matthew Layman-1824; Charles-1796; Peter-1766) Augustus M. was born on June 25, 1851, in Jersey City, Hudson Co., NJ, the son of Matthew Layman Eckler-1824 and Mary F. Pollock. . . .

By affixing birth year (as best known), and then referencing three generations back, you clarify who you are talking about (which George, etc) and how they fit in the family. Under his father's listing, he is shown with his siblings. To go beyond that, you have to sketch out a chart, but the info needed for that is readily available.

Some people use a number system: 111111111 where the first number indicates the first known ancestor and his brothers and sisters would be numbered sequentially by birthdate. The second number refers to the second generation and so on. Usually the information is published in numerical order with the result that the oldest ancestors appears first, followed by his oldest child, oldest grandchild, oldest great grandchild.

Others list all the first generation, then all their children.

The numbering systems work fine for families of 3 or 4 generations, but for families of 10 or more generations the information you are trying to follows gets spread all over. That is why I prefer to list everyone alphabetically by first name. Then their parents or children can easily be followed without resorting to the index.

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Author: Windowseat Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 734 of 796
Subject: Re: Charting Date: 11/25/2012 2:17 PM
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The numbering systems work fine for families of 3 or 4 generations, but for families of 10 or more generations the information you are trying to follows gets spread all over. That is why I prefer to list everyone alphabetically by first name. Then their parents or children can easily be followed without resorting to the index.

That sounds interesting.

My mother's family appears to have arrived somewhere between 1630 and 1640, and never left town. They married cousins and distant cousins, and often named their children after their brothers or sisters. And they all had about 10 kids that lived to adulthood. The result is craziness.

I've started poking around a bit with the Excel chart, just to see what information might be useful. Entering the chart number will help, and I thought I could include the person's relationship to me, which might help when I'm trying to figure out which John Collins I'm talking about, or whether there are two Morris Hobbs, or five, or one. Putting the grandparent, parent, child relationship might help, too.

Having everyone remain in the same area is a huge help in some ways, because everyone is there, and research can be limited to just a few towns. Lots of people have already done a lot of the groundwork. I don't have to figure out whether someone from five states away is a relative. But it can cause confusion when the same people keep marrying cousins.

Nancy
and that can't possibly be the man in the story because he'd been dead for 25 years when that event took place!

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