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I discovered this AM that you can confirm receipt of your return using the IRS "Where's My Refund?" program even if you don't have a refund coming. Just enter $1.00 as the expected refund amount. It should tell you the return has been received and is being processed.

I've always used this program when I was expecting a refund. If no refund was due, I just watched for my check to clear to confirm the return had been received. This year I had no refund due and paid the balance due via EFTPS. Only after I'd mailed the return did it occur to me I wouldn't know if the return wasn't received until a delinquent notice arrived. Happily the IRS program works even when you owe taxes. I'd suggest waiting a couple weeks after mailing before trying it though.
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No. of Recommendations: 2
I discovered this AM that you can confirm receipt of your return using the IRS "Where's My Refund?" program even if you don't have a refund coming. Just enter $1.00 as the expected refund amount. It should tell you the return has been received and is being processed.

I've always used this program when I was expecting a refund. If no refund was due, I just watched for my check to clear to confirm the return had been received. This year I had no refund due and paid the balance due via EFTPS. Only after I'd mailed the return did it occur to me I wouldn't know if the return wasn't received until a delinquent notice arrived. Happily the IRS program works even when you owe taxes. I'd suggest waiting a couple weeks after mailing before trying it though.


This is a penny-wise and pound-foolish method. Using your method, if you discover that your return wasn't received, what do you do then? Rush to get another copy filed by the deadline? And what if the deadline has already passed?

If you spend a few dollars to mail your return by certified mail you don't have to worry if the return was received. The certified mail receipt is proof of filing. The burden is on the IRS to prove that you didn't actually send what you claim (such as, you sent an empty envelope or the wrong return). This rule has been upheld by many court decisions.

Ira
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