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Author: flyerboys Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 454814  
Subject: Cookie Monster Conversations Date: 9/2/2013 6:53 AM
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Oil rich Norway has kept Cookie Monster under close control. Too close? That is the issue for their election this September. In addition to Cookie Monster, throw in Norway's billionaire, Olav Thon, and the entire macroeconomic debate over "the curse of rich resources" (e.g. why are Saudi Arabia, Venezuela, and Nigeria stuck with much corruption and relatively little non-resource related growth when compared to resource poorer neighbors?)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resource_curse

Summarizing article on Norwegian election in Bloomberg:

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-09-01/norway-oil-riches-u...


Cookies are not inherently bad for you. The Question (intentional capital!) is how many cookies how fast are too much and how many make for happily shared enjoyment of good fortune? How do you set up a political economy that is, if not optimal, not sick making? Wonderful Cookie Monster shares his thoughts (with a nice hooky tune and dancing babes) here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2hjeZecqNHo

Of course, flyerboys thinks the Cookie Monster quandary is topped only by unanswerable and therefore best unasked mystical questions about the "meaning of life" and "free will", and so is one of the BEST of all questions, right up there with Keynes' question about jam and kittens:

The “purposive” man is always trying to secure a spurious and delusive immortality for his acts by pushing his interest in them forward into time. He does not love his cat, but his cat’s kittens; nor, in truth, the kittens, but only the kittens’ kittens, and so on forward forever to the end of cat-dom. For him jam is not jam unless it is a case of jam to-morrow and never jam to-day. Thus by pushing his jam always forward into the future, he strives to secure for his act of boiling it an immortality.

Yomfing my cookies with whole milk ONLY on feast days!

david fb
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Author: rubberthinking Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 432964 of 454814
Subject: Re: Cookie Monster Conversations Date: 9/2/2013 9:34 AM
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The “purposive” man is always trying to secure a spurious and delusive immortality for his acts by pushing his interest in them forward into time. He does not love his cat, but his cat’s kittens; nor, in truth, the kittens, but only the kittens’ kittens, and so on forward forever to the end of cat-dom. For him jam is not jam unless it is a case of jam to-morrow and never jam to-day. Thus by pushing his jam always forward into the future, he strives to secure for his act of boiling it an immortality.

fb,

This is what the avant-garde movements came to destroy. They moved to destroy what were empires in the west. They moved to destroy monuments. They moved to destroy daily living.

Before Jackson Pollack's 'style' was set in stone, painting and sculptures were meant as monuments to last for all time. Pollack's abstract expressionism was painted on unfixed canvasses. Those canvasses and the art will not be here 100 years from now. The acids from the paints are eating their way through the canvasses.

Willem de Kooning a great painter technically at a young age joined the movement by painting rejection. His thinking was that art had always been expressions of organization, he would take organization out of his paintings. The viewer sees the Woman series as a man just rejected sees the woman who rejected him. Her cruelty becomes his vision of what was once beautiful to him. His anxiety becomes the viewers reality. She is now ugly.

More meaningful art has not been able to overcome the movement to deconstruct the world around us. Organization is not expounded on as if it matters. Ironically we are now in the computer age and digital art has no really direction. FB or any of you, if you have seen any digital art of interest please link it to this thread.

Most 'artists' do not make it into the art history books. Cropping letters and pasting them broadly across a gallery wall or showing the public photographs of garbage cans in a row does not make it into the books. Most artists are not immortalized. Time tells a different story of what matters and what does not when the history is written.

As an aside Mapplethorope's work is the best of Obscenity Art as I call it. It is not the best because it is obscene, it is the best because he uses his design elements so well. And because he adds meaning to his work even though it is obscene. Obscenity art is meant to be expressions of free speech as we all know. But what if the speech is hollow? What if the free speech is unneeded? What if the free speech after insulting someone is pointless? Very few of the artists in the obscenity movement would or could ever matter. They were all still taking organization and questioning it, but sometimes like with Mapplethorpe there can be a greater political good to come out of the work.

While de Kooning lived in a age of dying Western European dreams of empire, his art was devoid of any direct political statements. He ended up drifting in his art. His art even became beautiful late in his life. And of course Pollack might be insulted by this, but he was a one trick pony. His art prior to his swirls of paint strewn across a canvass was actually full of technical prowess. What most viewers dont know about Pollack's dribbled splashed canvasses is that they are three dimensional. He is only really remembered for his one trick technically. His real legacy is leaving the viewer projecting himself endlessly into the art.

I ran into a young woman last week who was lucky. Her art professors let her know she was not going to be a good artist. So she is becoming a graphic artist. She might make a good living.

I have been cursed. I was told by my professors, who were professional artists in NYC themselves, many years ago that I would be one of the best artists if I wanted to be. Now some 23 years after art school it is back to the computer terminal. I want to have a show in NYC in the next year or two based on some digital art.

Dave

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Author: flyerboys Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 432966 of 454814
Subject: Re: Cookie Monster Conversations Date: 9/2/2013 11:16 AM
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Hey Dave

Kynes' pots of jam are pots of jam -- not art but consumables. And something strange happens when they are never eaten.

Veering OT but its still close to the weekend?!:

Coincidentally just two days ago I was in the Amsterdam Stedelijk Museum standing in front of some "important" de Koonings and Pollacks and (once again), finally just gave up. Across the hall were some other abstract expressionist pieces, a Rothko and some Barnett Newmans that were wonderful, teaching me to SEE into them, and then from that seeing to FEEL and even know something beyond words. Amazing given their utter abstraction.

Mapplethorpe utterly outrageous but also, in exactly the sense you were expressing, monumental. Beautiful, both technically and emotionally (once over the fear, loathing, hiccups or whatever else its raw nakedness induces). His works' monumentality already memorializes for me (and will memorialize and remind perhaps as long as it exists) of a particular way of seeing and feeling that occurred in a particular time and place. Perhaps the same with De K and Pollack, but I doubt it.

David fb

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Author: fleg9bo Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Recommended Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 432968 of 454814
Subject: Re: Cookie Monster Conversations Date: 9/2/2013 11:35 AM
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Across the hall were some other abstract expressionist pieces, a Rothko

http://www.theguardian.com/culture/2002/dec/07/artsfeatures

This is what Rothko told John Fischer, a fellow tourist he bumped into in the bar of an ocean liner crossing the Atlantic in the early summer of 1959 after he had been working for several months on the paintings [for the Four Seasons restaurant in NYC's Seagram building]. Fischer was an editor of Harper's Magazine and their conversations over drinks have therefore been recorded.

Fischer quotes Rothko describing the room in that very expensive restaurant in the Seagram Building as "a place where the richest bastards in New York will come to feed and show off." Rothko didn't seem to Fischer in the least unworldly, let alone spiritual about his intentions. "I hope to ruin the appetite of every son of a bitch who ever eats in that room," he gloated, with paintings that will make those rich bastards "feel that they are trapped in a room where all the doors and windows are bricked up."
______________________

Well, I thought it was interesting. Sometimes when I view abstract expressionist art, I, too, feel trapped in a room where all the doors and windows are bricked up.

--fleg, who prefers the Impressionists and Dutch masters

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Author: flyerboys Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 432974 of 454814
Subject: Re: Cookie Monster Conversations Date: 9/2/2013 12:30 PM
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Thanks for the link, fleg -- a scorching article and I will look up the entire lecture. (How can I resist "Painting Bites Back"?)

For me "spiritual" does NOT equal heavenly or meditative or pleasant. A doorway to hell is definitely on the "menu". The stedelijk rothko, for me, was a claustrophobic riff on education as in "blackboard jungle" vs education as in "to be led out of oneself."

http://www.stedelijk.nl/en/exhibitions/exchanges/new-on-disp...

(this print has no more resemblance to the actual painting than a police mug shot would have to the experience of a real human being -- for id only)

Similar to the sense of despair that Rothko might have felt when he realized that the "rich bastards" at the old 4 $easons would simply ignore the hell that he was offering them (and that Michelangelo had offered centuries earlier as fleg's link points out), the most shocking thing to me in visiting the great museums of Amsterdam was the absurd spectacle of hundreds of tourists eagerly, pushily, rudely, NOT LOOKING at anything as they took photos of all the "famous" paintings they could point their flashless cellphones at.

Had a cup of coffee during a break outside (about every 2-3 hours husband Mom and I would rest eyes, eat dutch apple pie or something, and handle internet-ed business) we sat near a friendly young museum guard, an immigrant from Surinam, who laughed with us about the spectacle of tourists paying 1000's to come and view art through their crap cameras. But then she grew somber. She had come to Amsterdam to study art and, seeing how art is treated in the city of Rembrandt, she is thinking on becoming a professional cook. "But they don't taste the food either" she said, and we all 4 went sardonic.

Dang, I do an OP on Norwegian oil political-economy and cookie monster and look where we are in just 5 posts! I love METAR.

david fb

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Author: tim443 Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 432978 of 454814
Subject: Re: Cookie Monster Conversations Date: 9/2/2013 1:38 PM
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Dang, I do an OP on Norwegian oil political-economy and cookie monster and look where we are in just 5 posts! I love METAR.

david fb



Well it could escalate beyond control as I forwarded the clip to my 3 yo grandson who at two last year dragged me up and down the beach at the Beaches resort in Turks and Caicos looking for Cookie Monster.


Tim

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Author: warrl Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 432988 of 454814
Subject: Re: Cookie Monster Conversations Date: 9/2/2013 3:12 PM
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(e.g. why are Saudi Arabia, Venezuela, and Nigeria stuck with much corruption and relatively little non-resource related growth when compared to resource poorer neighbors?)

There is a fundamental error here.

An economy (local or global) will tend to exploit first the resources which can be most easily and profitably exploited. If those resources are sufficiently easily and profitably exploited - as compared to other resources - their use will dominate the economy possibly to the point of suppressing the exploitation of resources that are hard to exploit profitably.

That's natural.

The error is in not recognizing all sorts of resources. In particular, the one resource that has proven to be of greater value than any other is often not recognized as a resource at all - and it isn't easy to exploit.

That resource is intelligence and reasoning ability.

Keynes: The “purposive” man is always trying to secure a spurious and delusive immortality for his acts by pushing his interest in them forward into time. He does not love his cat, but his cat’s kittens; nor, in truth, the kittens, but only the kittens’ kittens, and so on forward forever to the end of cat-dom. For him jam is not jam unless it is a case of jam to-morrow and never jam to-day.

In other words, Keynes' definition of the "purposive" man allows no value whatsoever, possibly even a negative value, for immediacy. This "purposive" man would take bread from the mouths of his children and let them starve to death, if he could preserve that bread for the benefit of his not-yet-born grandchildren, not noting that if he does not feed his children those grandchildren will never be.

Keynes' "purposive" man is an idiot comparable to one who would force the farmer to starve to death so that the beggar may eat.

A purposive man with intelligence values both the present and the future, and values the present more - but not infinitely more. He will give up SOME present benefit (however he might define "benefit") to gain future benefit, but will also abandon SOME future benefit to gain present benefit. He will not give up ALL present benefit or ALL future benefit.

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Author: rubberthinking Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 433003 of 454814
Subject: Re: Cookie Monster Conversations Date: 9/2/2013 9:57 PM
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http://www.stedelijk.nl/en/exhibitions/exchanges/new-on-disp...

fb,

Rothko is interesting. He does have an unspeakable power. But a frustrating power in that he builds nothing. If you sit in your sh$t and then find a spiritual place in life that does not mean anything practical has been achieved at all. Perhaps with your rejuvenated self you might work in a more balanced way. But if you sell your sole to the Four Seasons Restaurant and Bar, well I can see why Rothko was drinking his way across the Atlantic. He might have been an empty spiritualist, which would have been his own fault. I have known many in AA. And sometimes they had very long term sobriety.

I expect very few of the possible art buyers to know what they are truly buying if/when they buy my art. I expect them to like a pretty picture. Or try to apply some class and sophistication. They will at least in my case take aim. They might not know whether to p*ss on it or like it. It will be a scary middle ground I take for my critics. I could not actually care any less at all. My goal it to make a new gendra. By leaving avant-garde work out of my work, I take a whole new look at art and give it a new life. My work will be a new digital type of work.

I dont see Rothko or Mapplethorpe as building monuments. Mapplethorpe was shaping history yes, but not building monuments. A monument by its nature can not be obscene. Dignity and power are the hallmarks of monuments. We dont have only the arses of horses in city squares with naked figures of George Washington carving out our nation's history.

What your security guard or head chef next week does not know is whether she has something worthwhile to do or say or cook. The audience is going to be all sorts of things. The artists also run from good to bad and sometimes truly talented.

I am not the most technical of artists. A few years ago I saw a young woman painting a colonial scene as if from the back of a two dollar bill. I forget what group portrait she was copying. She had a large part of it done. It was painstakingly hard long hours of work. She was tackling it phenomenally well. She was an art student who was very frustrated and often in the local bars drunk off her arse. She worked sporadically and lived poorly. What is new? She technically was much better than I want to be. But she had no production. Her art was generally only half finished. She was a great artist and a failed artist. The gift of interesting new art was not her thing. Most art students hate the history lessons that go along with a good education in art. They dont want to have to get around to their own work. They wish to be inventive without leaving their young thoughts on the scrap heap of the undone.

Art history for me formed an idea in my head. If I am to be an artist I must do something undone that matters to the world of art. I am no Picasso or Rembrandt, perhaps I am a Cezanne. That would be good enough for me.

Dave

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Author: rubberthinking Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 433007 of 454814
Subject: Re: Cookie Monster Conversations Date: 9/2/2013 10:24 PM
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http://www.impactlab.net/2013/09/02/fujifilm-reproduces-near...

Van Gogh is going 3-D....Dave

Snip:

So far five of Van Gogh’s paintings have been re-created using this technique, but Fujifilm has an exclusive three-year deal with the museum, so many more should be on their way.

For now, the plan is to test release the project in the Hong Kong market and gauge interest in these sorts of products. Each copy will be limited to a print run of 260, and if these Relievos make it stateside, getting one of your own will cost you about $34,000.

That’s not exactly “cheap,” but considering the fact that Van Gogh’s Vase with Fifteen Sunflowers last sold for $39.7 million in 1987 (adjusted for inflation, that would be about $82.4 million today), $34,000 seems like chump change.


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Author: rubberthinking Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 433072 of 454814
Subject: Re: Cookie Monster Conversations Date: 9/3/2013 7:14 PM
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Kynes' pots of jam are pots of jam -- not art but consumables. And something strange happens when they are never eaten.

fb,

Keynes' pots of jam are figurative perhaps like Freud's cigar.

Abstract thought has a world of its own. It only touches down when we want to see success or when someone else wishes to point out failures that never occurred.

If you cherry pick work by Keynes and then say he is failure, well by god your examples could prove it. But if you read Keynes and then look for his successes you need to cherry pick much more fairly and judiciously.

Keynes' successes for me at least are more important than using examples the old master never would have used. Prejudice is still prejudice.

Dave

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Author: fleg9bo Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Recommended Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 433320 of 454814
Subject: Re: Cookie Monster Conversations Date: 9/6/2013 10:33 PM
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the Amsterdam Stedelijk Museum

So there aren't any Vermeers in the Stedelijk, but I thought this was interesting:

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000142412788732412300457905...

"Tim's Vermeer," a documentary directed by the Teller of Penn & Teller.

The subject at hand [is] the 17th-century Dutch painter whose interior scenes of middle-class life seem to possess a supernal glow. The Tim of the title is Tim Jenison, an obviously brilliant and hugely companionable inventor — a Yankee tinkerer in the digital age. He devises a practical test of the notion, advanced most recently by David Hockney, that Vermeer achieved his mysterious photorealism with the help of optical tools — a camera obscura plus lenses and mirrors — that were widely available in the Holland of his time. It's thrilling to watch Mr. Jenison, who keeps reminding us that he's no painter, use those tools to pull off a kind of magic trick — creating an entirely convincing Vermeer with his own hand.
____________________

I hope it comes soon to a theater near me.

--fleg

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Author: notehound Big gold star, 5000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 433330 of 454814
Subject: Re: Cookie Monster Conversations Date: 9/7/2013 7:15 AM
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"Tim's Vermeer," a documentary directed by the Teller of Penn & Teller.

Vermeer is my favorite painter, Mark Rothko is my second favorite - both so different, yet both evoking feelings of well-being in me.

Whenever we are in Europe doing the "Museums and Cathedrals" of whatever town or city, I always try to see if there is a Vermeer in residence in the local gallery. Since fewer than 35 undisputed Vermeers are in existence, one must take pleasure just one or two (or sometimes, three) at the time.

One of the singularly happy days of my life took place in the Spring of 2001, when the Metropolitan Museum of Art held a monumental exhibition entitled "Vermeer and the Delft School," with 15 Vermeers, including many borrowed from Europe for the first time.

That day, DW and I lingered over 15 Vermeers at the Met, followed by the 3 native Vermeers at The Frick Collection, for a total 18 Vermeers in one day.

http://www.metmuseum.org/about-the-museum/press-room/exhibit...

After seeing more than half the Vermeers in the World in just one day, I still retained my preference for a single favorite picture of all: "Portrait of a Young Woman," which is permanently housed in Room 12 at the Met. I am absolutely filled with pathos, empathy, and agápe (love) every time I visit this young Vermeer girl. See link:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portrait_of_a_Young_Woman_(Verm...

Although "my young girl from Room 12 at the Met" is always considered a lesser masterpiece than the universally acclaimed "Girl With a Pearl Earring..." See link:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Girl_with_a_Pearl_Earring

My young girl may not be as beautiful from an objective viewpoint, but from a subjective viewpoint, she is the most beautiful girl in the world. I can see the kindness in J. Vermeer's own face as he painted my young girl. In the very act of painting her portrait, the artist was able to convince this young girl of her worth and beauty. The joy of the artist's attention measures on her face.

I can never thank Mr. Vermeer enough for immortalizing those moments he spent with her.

;-)

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Author: flyerboys Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 433349 of 454814
Subject: Re: Cookie Monster Conversations Date: 9/7/2013 11:13 AM
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fleg: wonderful article and I am very looking forward to the vid. Thanks.

david rub think: I love Keynes and very much understood that he was making a metaphor. A metaphor about economics, consumption, and not art. And it is crucial to hear the high arch satirical in his voice! FUNNY people. Crucial economic point (but why, WHY are two pots of jam next week worth more than one pot today for some people, but by no means all?)

Back to art!

From a deep short article by Leon Wiesentier "Flaking Paint and Blemishes"

http://www.newrepublic.com/article/113312/washington-diarist...

bolding and italics by david fb:
*****************************************************
I stood before The Great Piece of Turf, Dürer’s heart-stopping watercolor of 1503, in the National Gallery. It depicts only a homely clump of grass, with plantain and dandelion, in a muddy patch of dirt. This picture is a miracle not only of the artist’s hands, but also of the artist’s eyes. When Dürer saw those weeds, he saw the occasion for an apotheosis of naturalism in Western art. In the marginal he perceived the monumental. ...but would we have marveled also at what it shows? We, who are always still learning to see, would not even have noticed it. It was dull, after all, until Dürer demonstrated that it was exciting.

The Great Piece of Turf is a masterpiece of the morality of noticing, a genuinely thrilling example of the redemption of the unperceived world by perception. Realism in art is not like realism elsewhere. In art, realism, too, is an accomplishment of the imagination. What is imagined is the world as it really is; or the world as it would appear if it were totally visible, or if we were totally able to see it.
*****************************************************

That is what visual art is for me -- lessons in seeing. I did not get it until i was relatively old -- 43, and I came around a corner and saw Max Beckmann's Self Portrait with Horn from 1938. I barely moved for an hour.

http://www.artnet.com/magazine/news/ntm4/ntm6-1-18.asp

Then I turned a corner and saw his The Argonauts,

http://www.google.es/imgres?imgurl=http://en.wahooart.com/Ar...

and then stared at it (with breaks for the eyes) for hours and was finally empathically thrown out by the guards (they accepted my behavior as quite normal in their world) as they started locking the last doors.

I was blind, and now I see. Then came so many more.

And with that I find it very suitable to join in the words of the other thread and say Happy New Year! and may the Gates of Heaven stay open to hear our cries and prayers, but more importantly, may the Angels of Perception come forth and scrub out our 5 senses and refresh out Morality of Noticing.

david fb

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Author: flyerboys Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 433350 of 454814
Subject: Re: Cookie Monster Conversations Date: 9/7/2013 11:15 AM
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OOoops. Here is a clean link to The Argonauts:


http://en.wahooart.com/Art.nsf/O/8LSVX2/$File/Max-Beckmann-T...

david fb

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Author: rubberthinking Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 433351 of 454814
Subject: Re: Cookie Monster Conversations Date: 9/7/2013 12:00 PM
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apotheosis

fb,

When I was a twenty something I looked into a dictionary and decided apotheosis was my favorite word.

LOL

Good word

Dave

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Author: notehound Big gold star, 5000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 433355 of 454814
Subject: Re: Cookie Monster Conversations Date: 9/7/2013 12:24 PM
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...Happy New Year! and may the Gates of Heaven stay open to hear our cries and prayers, but more importantly, may the Angels of Perception come forth and scrub out our 5 senses and refresh out Morality of Noticing.

david fb,

I can always count on you to say something inspiring and insightful. Thanks for being there.

:-)

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Author: rubberthinking Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 433356 of 454814
Subject: Re: Cookie Monster Conversations Date: 9/7/2013 12:27 PM
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In the marginal he perceived the monumental.

http://www.wiki.com/results1.htm?cx=009420061493499222400%3A...

fb,

Above is the wiki link to monument.

Monuments are really over rated.

Monumental has a somewhat different definition.

If we look at Cezanne as an artist Picasso builds on, we see
Max Beckmann as an artist building on Picasso. I truly admire
Beckmann's and Cezanna's work. But there can only be one Picasso,
or at least we only know of one. LOL

Picasso's cubism though is far more important than anything
done in the arts before it and after the Geek figures in the
round. The statues of discus throwers made in ancient Greece are optical reality. Optical reality is a very serious human achievement.
Humans took over 20,000 years from the stick figures drawn in caves in
France to the Golden Age of Greece and the development of optical
reality. Cubism becomes the next major level of achievement by artists.
Cubism as we know is studying how the eyes work with the brain.

Cubism comes in the period of Einstein, Freud and somewhat regrettably
Marx <who is the least of these thinkers> revolutionizing the
world around them. Relativity becomes a new way of thinking, and
Cubism, and more importantly for the viewers of art synthetic cubism,
become a way of seeing.

Then very quickly in human history we get to abstract
expressionists art in which the viewer is to put himself into
the work. Even if the viewer is kicking and screaming.

With some abstract art we must feel sorry for the viewer. <tongue in cheek>

Dave

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Author: rubberthinking Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 433357 of 454814
Subject: Re: Cookie Monster Conversations Date: 9/7/2013 12:33 PM
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fb,

Just a thought....

I live in the digital age,
therefore I must be digital.

Dave

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Author: fleg9bo Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Recommended Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 433370 of 454814
Subject: Re: Cookie Monster Conversations Date: 9/7/2013 6:36 PM
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Max Beckmann

Loved those two Beckmanns (Beckmenn?). I noticed the link to one of them was through the Spanish google site. What's up with that?

--fleg, spanophile

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Author: fleg9bo Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Recommended Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 433374 of 454814
Subject: Re: Cookie Monster Conversations Date: 9/7/2013 8:24 PM
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may the Angels of Perception come forth and scrub out our 5 senses and refresh out Morality of Noticing.

I just remembered this fun film that I saw at the art museum as part of a local film festival:

Rembrandt's J'Accuse

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1303889/?ref_=sr_2

"J'accuse" is an 'essay-istic' documentary in which Greenaway's fierce criticism of today's visual illiteracy is argued by means of a forensic search of Rembrandt's Nightwatch. Greenaway explains the background, the context, the conspiracy, the murder and the motives of all its 34 painted characters who have conspired to kill for their combined self-advantage. Greenaway leads us through Rembrandt's paintings into 17th century Amsterdam. He paints a world that is democratic in principle, but is almost entirely ruled by twelve families. The notion exists of these regents as charitable and compassionate beings. However, reality was different.
_____________________________

Happy viewing.

--fleg

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Author: flyerboys Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 433452 of 454814
Subject: Re: Cookie Monster Conversations Date: 9/9/2013 5:14 AM
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This video celebrating the reopened and wonderfully renewed Amsterdam Rijksmuseum

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a6W2ZMpsxhg

perfectly supports fleg's post one back in this thread, pointing out the contrast between Rembrandt's dark dark dark meaning and the popular conception from its first showing to its patrons down to the present. Expertly drives the insane divide between surface and depth deeper still, and does so playfully and delightfully.

Our rulers are benevolent, kind, watchful, expert, and deeply committed to our happiness and well-being.

Bread and Circuses Forever!

Don't worry and keep shopping.


david fb
(I LOVE being alive, darkly muttering and sharpening my dirk-like boning knife and my heavy butcher's blade barely come second to shaving up before making love!)

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