Message Font: Serif | Sans-Serif
 
No. of Recommendations: 0
I've noticed I get tired easier and quicker doing just routine things. I'd guessed this was due to increasing age and I'm sure part of it is...but it just seems to have hit me (and my sister) noticeably over the past year or so. Got poking around and found web sites touting Co-Enzyme Q10 that is a necessary part of muscle cell metabolism, but it drops off with age and this decline can be increased by statins (cholesterol reducers), which I'm also on. Of course, there are gobs of sites selling CoQ10, claiming all kinds of benefits.

Does anyone have any experience with this supplement?

Thanks

BruceM
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I've noticed I get tired easier and quicker doing just routine things. I'd guessed this was due to increasing age and I'm sure part of it is...but it just seems to have hit me (and my sister) noticeably over the past year or so. Got poking around and found web sites touting Co-Enzyme Q10 that is a necessary part of muscle cell metabolism, but it drops off with age and this decline can be increased by statins (cholesterol reducers), which I'm also on. Of course, there are gobs of sites selling CoQ10, claiming all kinds of benefits.

Does anyone have any experience with this supplement?

Thanks

BruceM



No experience, but:

CoQ10 supplements might be beneficial for treating conditions such as congestive heart failure and Parkinson's disease. CoQ10 is considered safe, with few side effects. However, be sure to take this supplement under your doctor's supervision.

https://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements-coenzyme-q10/ar...

and

CoQ10 has been used to treat many different conditions. There's evidence that CoQ10 supplements can lower blood pressure slightly. CoQ10 is also used to treat heart failure and other heart conditions, possibly helping to improve some symptoms and lessen future cardiac risks when combined with regular medications, but the evidence is conflicting.

Though still controversial, some preliminary evidence suggests that CoQ10 may help to prevent or treat the adverse effects, such as muscle pains and liver problems, of taking statin-type cholesterol drugs.

Preliminary studies have shown that CoQ10 may slow, but not stop, the progression of Alzheimer's disease. Additional research is needed to confirm this effect.

CoQ10 has also been studied as a preventive treatment for migraine headaches, though it may take several months to work. It was also been studied for low sperm count, cancer, HIV, muscular dystrophy, Parkinson’s disease, gum disease, and many other conditions. However, the research has not found any conclusive benefits. Although CoQ10 is sometimes sold as an energy supplement, there is no evidence that it will boost energy in a typical person.


https://www.webmd.com/diet/supplement-guide-coenzymeq10-coq1...

Karen
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
"Does anyone have any experience with this supplement?

Thanks

BruceM "

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

I cannot offer direct experience with this supplement - but when I
brought up the question about supplements to my family doctor, he
suggested that a nutritionist - or dietician - might be a better
way to improve areas. Supplements are generally not checked for
quality, levels of minerals, levels of contaminates and such. Most all
supplements include a caveat "not intended to cure any ills" or similar
note.
I do know many - many people who swear by supplements of all kinds. My DW
has used some on a regular basis for years - calcium, biotin, and others. She was
taken off all of them by doctors who were looking into reasons she has been
falling recently and she has not gone back on them as of yet. I suspect she will
resume a few - but I hope not.

If you decide to go ahead - be very careful about the source of any supplement
you take. The costs of getting things tested and validated is a cost well worth
paying.

Howie52
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 5
I have 2 heart conditions and a pacemaker. I frequently have people telling me that I need to take this supplement or that as it'd doing wonders for them. In fact, a few have gotten quite pushy about it when I explain I don't take anything over the counter that is not cleared first or prescribed by my 2 cardiologists.

I'm 73 now and doing fine living alone, driving, volunteering 20 hours per week. I still manage my own investments and personal finances. Sheesh, I can even put gas in my car with no help from a stranger. I can bread in the correct aisle and use of my debit card or credit card hasn't stumped me yet. I can use my iPhone 8 and don't need the big buttons or the red button on some old style flip phone.

Please!!! Stop telling me I'm old and can't manage my life.

Happy 4th of July to everyone. Thank the Lord for our freedom!!!
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Hi BruceM,

I use: https://www.costco.com/Qunol-Mega-CoQ10-100-mg.,-120-Softgel...

After a fair bit of research it seems to be the best available.

Bill
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 4
Like any herbal medicine I am 100% certain you can find dozens of personal endorsements and claims.

Like every other OTC supplement I take the position if the item is even half as good as claimed, why aren't there studies demonstrating that.

The best example of these snake folks that I can think of is all the excitement in the 1990s on how Vitamins D and E were going to prevent or reduce cancer deaths because those items would reduce free radicals. When somebody got around to actually studying, the data showed higher cancer death rates and lower life expectancy for folks dosing up on Vitamin E.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Like every other OTC supplement I take the position if the item is even half as good as claimed, why aren't there studies demonstrating that.

I have seen the ads for something called Prevagen which is claimed to improve an aging memory. They claim clinical trials, but in poking around, I only see self-serving ads.

Anyone have any actual data?

CNC
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
Anyone have any actual data?

Not since Orrin Hatch and Tom Harkin deregulated the supplement industry in 1994 and prohibited the FDA from doing any studies.

Orrin Hatch is leaving the Senate, but his deadliest law will live on
http://www.latimes.com/business/hiltzik/la-fi-hiltzik-hatch-...

</snip>


I'd select a random can of household cleaner from beneath my kitchen sink and drink it before I'd take one of these unregulated supplements.

intercst
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
CoQ10 supplements might be beneficial for treating conditions such as congestive heart failure

My uncle has congestive heart failure, and had been told there wasn't much they could do for him. He did a bunch of research on the Internet and started using some version of Vitamin K2 (!?). Now, he's running every day with little or no problem. Best condition he's been in in years. Last year, we didn't think he'd make it much longer.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 3
I have seen the ads for something called Prevagen which is claimed to improve an aging memory. They claim clinical trials, but in poking around, I only see self-serving ads.

Anyone have any actual data?

CNC


-----------------

I am skeptical because the ads tout the product is based on a protein originally found in jellyfish.

Jellyfish??? It's not like jellyfish are known for their exceptional memory. Now if Prevagen was based on something found in elephants, that would be different.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
". Now if Prevagen was based on something found in elephants, that would be different"

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Perhaps salt water crocodiles ate the jellyfish and then when the elephants got their
trunks from being pulled out by the crocodiles the jellyfish memory thingy entered via the new trunk?

Howie52
A stretch - I know. But after all, you can see the trunks.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
GWPotter:

Amen.

We avoid any of those "supplements".

As our doctors recommend, we don't smoke, drink very little, try to eat good food, exercise in moderation, sleep on a pretty regular schedule, and ignore all the crazy OTC "supplements".

Up to each of us, but why take chances? Especially if you're on any actual MD-prescribed medications; how might supplements interact with those?

Just saying...

Good luck.

Vermonter
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 3
Hi Bill
Yes, I finished reading two research articles on CoQ10, with both showing positive but non-conclusive results in their sample. I e-mailed my internist, who kind of gave me a standard reply, saying research shows limited success but that it should not do any harm for me with my current meds.

I'm going to start with the 300mg caplets from Costco, taken one per day. They're kind of large, but being torpedo shaped, seem to go down ok.

On sale at $17/100 count.

https://www.costco.com/Kirkland-Signature-CoQ10-300-mg.%2C-1...

I'm measuring my pulse and respiration rate before and after our morning 1.5 Mi walk and my general feeling of health. Yes, pretty crude, but we'll see.

BruceM
Print the post Back To Top
Advertisement