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http://www.sacbee.com/2011/03/25/3502531/boomers-innovators-...

Meanwhile, Carle sees another largely untapped option for baby boomers: cruise ships.

"You have a hospital and doctors on board," he said. "Your housekeeping and meals are paid for. It wouldn't work for skilled nursing, no. But for assisted living? Yeah. And you travel the world.

"Will everybody be able to afford it? No. But it takes 700 or 800 people to fill a cruise ship. Out of 78 million of us, you can find 700."

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intercst
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Yeah, not so much in my book. Ships tend to have portal style doors which you have to step over, which might be difficult for those who have difficulty walking. Decks can get wet and slippery. Illnesses can spread quickly through a cruise ship. Plus, evacuation plans for a ship full of passengers that by definition need assistance could be difficult. I just don't see it.

Fuskie
Who thinks it could work for senior facilities who are not yet in an assisted living situation...
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Yeah, not so much in my book. Ships tend to have portal style doors which you have to step over, which might be difficult for those who have difficulty walking. Decks can get wet and slippery. Illnesses can spread quickly through a cruise ship. Plus, evacuation plans for a ship full of passengers that by definition need assistance could be difficult. I just don't see it.


They'll just make you sign a waiver. Or lie about how they have all this covered and there's nothing to worry about, just to get the money. Like an oil rig or nuke plant operators.
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Ships tend to have portal style doors which you have to step over

Fuskie, I have never seen one of those on a cruise ship. They resemble hotels much more than ships.

They do have round port hole windows in some cabins.

Seasickness is more of a problem. Some people have trouble getting used to being at sea.

And the distances to be walked on the larger ships might be a concern.

But actually the numbers don't work so well. Independent living apartments with food service and activities can be had for $60/day. Most cruise ships start at about $100/day for the lowest cost cruises in the smallest cabins.

People who need more extensive care pay more--as much as $200/day, but they are not going to get that care on a cruise ship.
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This is a spin off of an email making the rounds at least 10 years ago.

And here's a 2005 TMF article that grabbed on - http://www.fool.com/personal-finance/retirement/2005/02/02/t...
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Ships tend to have portal style doors which you have to step over

Fuskie, I have never seen one of those on a cruise ship. They resemble hotels much more than ships.



Agreed:
http://www.johnstonfamilyma.com/cruise/theship/

But actually the numbers don't work so well. Independent living apartments with food service and activities can be had for $60/day. Most cruise ships start at about $100/day for the lowest cost cruises in the smallest cabins.

You can probably do a cruise for about $100 a day, including tips. But keep in mind that the activities on a cruise ship are far beyond what an assisted living center would have. In our 7 night cruise (granted we paid $250 per day per person, but on the Oasis of the Seas) we saw an ice show, a comedian, a lessor comedian, and an improve show. There were several other shows we didn't go to.
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But actually the numbers don't work so well. Independent living apartments with food service and activities can be had for $60/day. Most cruise ships start at about $100/day for the lowest cost cruises in the smallest cabins.

We've taken 30 cruises (325 cruise days) in the last few years. We've actually met a few (less than a dozen) people who have essentially retired to live on a ship. We asked some of them how they can afford it. The lines give them a special rate, but they do NOT admit to it.

The price really goes down when you pre-arrange several months booking at once. One couple told us that they've been to most of the ports many times, and they rearly bother to get off the ship. When the ship goes into dry-dock they'd just switch to another ship.

Sounds boring to me, but who knows how I'll feel about it at 90?
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Sounds boring to me, but who knows how I'll feel about it at 90?

If you are reasonably healthy and enjoy travelling, I can see how it might appeal to some. You have lots of people to talk to, good food, free entertainment. And nice climate.

Plus in time you get to know the crew and the ins and outs of your cruise ship.

I'm sure that may not appeal to everyone, but compared to independent living it has its advantages. More lively crowds. More energy. etc etc.

It might be fun to try one for a while and then try the other. Then write a book on the experience. Then perhaps we will know more about it. Most of what we read about extended cruising is speculative.
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pauleckler writes,

It might be fun to try one for a while and then try the other. Then write a book on the experience. Then perhaps we will know more about it. Most of what we read about extended cruising is speculative.

</snip>


I took a cruise around South America and down to the Antarctic Peninsula a few years ago that lasted three weeks. I felt like I'd been in the Navy by the third week, so 2 weeks may be my limit.

intercst
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