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As a life-long Cub fan, I should be emotionally well prepared to deal with the turn of events in last nights NLCS.

I will admit that I was overcome with a profound 1984esque dread before game time.

It was an accurate premonition.

I will be dealing with the ineveitable outcome by going into seclusion, beginning with the ALCS game, and continuing through the expected final humiliation in Wrigley Field this evening. During this time of introspection, I will not be e-mailing, text-messaging, posting, or taking calls. I will simply watch the inevitable denouement of this tragedy play itself out, and accept whatever meaning can be derived from an empty bottle of scotch.

In preparation for the game, I will re-read The Last Pennant before Armageddon (excerpt below) by W.P. Kinsella (the author that wrote Field of Dreams). In this short story, the coach of the Chicago Cubs is haunted by a recurring prophetic dream that if the Cubs win the Pennant, it will trigger the end of the world.

For any real Cub fan, The End of World seems a reasonable price to pay for a Pennant. Everyone else should be grateful to the fan that knocked the ball away from Moises Alou. As a result, the Cubs will lose, and the world will go on, as Armageddon is postponed indefinitely.

Oh yeah ... here is a link to a current newspaper story to justify this post as an OT Current Event.

I assume that Mark Prior was referring to the Kinsella Prophecy in his quote from SF Chronicle this morning:

"... this is the end of the world, I think we'll be all right," - Mark Prior

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2003/10/15/NLCS.TMP
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Finally, an excerpt from: The Last Pennant before Armageddon by W.P. Kinsella:

"The sun is finally shining on Al Tiller," read a recent headline in the Trib. For the moment he was the most famous baseball manager in the nation, the man guiding the Chicago Cubs toward their first pennant in half a century; everyone wanted to talk baseball, no one gave a damn about his dreams.
He could picture himself at a news conference, pausing right in the middle of fielding questions about his pitching rotation and his left fielder's Achilles tendon, to say, "Gentlemen for the past several weeks I have been having prophetic dreams. It is my considered opinion that if the the Chicago Cubs win the National league pennant, the world is going to end. " ...
It was on the sixth night God spoke. Tiller was certain that Al Capone was one of lobbyists that evening. He had always thought of Capone as a White Sox fan. ...
"I appreciate your interest," God said. "I want to assure you that I hold the Chicago Cubs in highest esteem. I have listened to your entreaties and considered the matter carefully from all angles. I am aware of how long it has been since the Cubs have won a pennant. I think you should know that when the Cubs next win the National League Championship, it will be the last pennant before Armageddon ...."
Al Tiller assumed there was more, however that was the point at which he woke up, his sweat soaked pajamas wrapped around him like wet sheets, his heart thrumming. His last sight had been of the lobbyists leaping to their feet with joy as if their favorite player had just homered in a clutch situation.
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The game ain't over yet!!

I hate it when a fan counts the game as a loss before the fat lady has even started warming up her voice.

Not a cubs fan, just a sports fan. :-) Good luck tonite!!
I am pulling for the Cubs. Ok so I am looking forward to the end of the world .... but I do not think a Cubs victory will have any effect.
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I hate it when a fan counts the game as a loss before the fat lady has even started warming up her voice. - IH

By way of explanation, this is a basic motivational technique of my invention:

MAPAESTNE - Maintaining a Positive Attitude and Emotional Stability Through Negative Expectations. - exo
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fish 6 cubs 5 end of fitfh
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That Lady finished her song and it turns out that it was a dirge, but the good news is that Armageddon will have to wait till next year!

But Wait till next year!!! :-)

One really wonderful thing about baseball is that in most cases your team will be resurrected in the spring.
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So the Cubs go home with their tails between their legs and now everyone wants to blame the fan who caught the pop up. IMO, he didn't do anything that anyone else wouldn't have done in his place.

solent
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He was focused on the ball just like the 20 or 30 other people in the vacinity, I saw at least 7 other hands reaching for the ball, some of those people probably pushed that fan forward.
No one was at fault, I am sorry the cubs lost. What makes it worse is that I am pulling for the RedSox against the Yankees. :-{
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I saw at least 7 other hands reaching for the ball IH

I agree. In the replay, no one in the stands is showing any awareness that Moises Alou has a play on the ball, or is even that he is there. Not one. Everyone is looking up at the ball. There is no reason to expect Bartman to see something no other fan around him saw.

The real problem for the Cubs that innning was caused by the Alex Gonzalez error, which should rank right up there with the Durham and Buckner errors, but somehow has been overshadowed by Bartman's grab.

I saw this in the MLB board, and agree with the sentiment:

Dropping an easy grounder: free
Leaving your pitcher in the game even though his arm is falling off: free
Throwing a straight fastball to a fastball hitter: free
Having a fan make a mistake that really didn't cost the game but deflects all the blame: priceless


I can't cheer for the Marlins or Yankees, so I guess I'll pick up the Boston cause for as long as it lasts.

Anyway there is at least some consolation for Bartman, as he has been offered political asylum in Florida by Jeb Bush:

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Resort offers goat swanky asylum
Associated Press
Oct. 16, 2003 12:00 AM


MIAMI - If he's interested, the 26-year-old Chicago fan who deflected a foul ball away from a Cubs outfielder in Game 6 of the National League Championship Series can find solace in Florida.

Gov. Jeb Bush said Wednesday an offer of asylum for Steve Bartman might be a good idea, and an oceanfront retreat in Pompano Beach is offering him a free three-month stay, should he deem it necessary to get out of Chicago until the hubbub over the pop-up cools down.


http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/sports/articles/1016fan1016.html
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Gov. Jeb Bush said Wednesday an offer of asylum for Steve Bartman might be a good idea, and an oceanfront retreat in Pompano Beach is offering him a free three-month stay, should he deem it necessary to get out of Chicago until the hubbub over the pop-up cools down.

http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/sports/articles/1016fan1016.html
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"free"? "3 months"? "Florida"?
He should have tried to catch the ball 10x (maybe the offer would have been 30 months) ..... ;o)


--H
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In the replay, no one in the stands is showing any awareness that Moises Alou has a play on the ball, or is even that he is there. Not one. Everyone is looking up at the ball. There is no reason to expect Bartman to see something no other fan around him saw.


Yes there is...he was on the frontrow, and had a better view than anyone else.

On top of that, he's a baseball coach, and should have recognized the importance of that out.
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GBo3 says: "Yes there is...he was on the frontrow, and had a better view than anyone else.

On top of that, he's a baseball coach, and should have recognized the importance of that out."

Ah, isn't hindsight just wonderful? This poor guy is sitting close to the foul line and pole in left field on a cool fall night in Chicago and a ball comes his way. Now, he is supposed to look at the ball, then look at Alou, judge the chances of the latter even getting to the ball, never mind catching it, and he is to decide that in spite of an gross error by the shortstop and some pitching by a tired hurler, that, yes, the pennant does in fact depend on him not only not trying to catch the ball, but to hold his arms out to keep others away. Why? Because someone sees him as a baseball coach and he's supposed to know these things. The future of his 'Cubbies' depends on HIM. BTW,it's interesting that not one player (as far as I know) has come to this guy's defense - not even Dusty. Is this yet another example of the persons really responsible for a 'critical mistake' (after all, this is a game called baseball) not willing to accept that responsibility?

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Well--- when Don Larson pitched the perfect game in the series there was a foul ball that would have gone for an out except a fan grabbed for it it fell to the ground. Larson caught the batter looking on the next pitch. Champions find ways to win- not excuses for losing.
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