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Hi gang, this is my first time here, so please be kind. We palnted some cukes this year and have gotten overwhelmed. I've been making cucumber salads, and I'll be pickling them, but we still have too many. Any ideas?
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Relish them. There is a recipe in the Ball canning book that is very good. I just used up my last that I made a few years ago. Excellent and so much better than store bought/factory made stuff, even being a few years old.

Devin
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Different cuke salad.... Shred with large holes on grater. Salt and let sit to draw of water. Drain. Add vinegar, shopped onion, pepper, and a couple of tablespoons of cream.

At a church function last week, someone brought cukes that had been canned like the candied apples you get in some restaurants for garnish. Red and sweet. They were MARVELOUS. I don't have a recipe for that, however.

Finn (just back from two weeks of canning veggies at a friend's house in the Ozarks)
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1. Cold water pickles.
2. Sliced cucumber salad with sour cream and dill.
3. Tzatziki – Greek yogurt/cucumber dip/sauce.

C.J.V.
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They're actually not bad used the same as squash, though you might want to remove the skin if it's tough. I've been using them in stir-fries and casseroles.

Over-cuked too - but none of the squash grew this year!

Barb
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There is a recipe in the Ball canning book that is very good. I just used up my last that I made a few years ago.

Hiya Devin! Gee, I feel like I already know everyone here - Oh wait, I think I do. <grin>
I have the Ball Blue Book, which recipe is it? There's a couple.
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And if you discover you still have a cucumber overabundance even after using all the good suggestions here, don't overlook the following possibilities: local food bank, senior center or low income housing or childcare center, workplace, church/temple/mosque, food pantry/homeless shelter
, jobhunting neighbors, etc.
I've been taking extra garden produce in to the next town's senior center (conveniently next to public library) when I do a library run/post office/grocery trip. (Actually, I planted a few extra plants for that purpose, since gasoline and time constraints prohibit fifty-sixty mile special run to food bank.) One of the staff there said in my hearing that donated garden produce was as precious as gold, definitely welcome, and he wished more people would do so--hearing that really was incentive to check garden for extra produce.
And I think CJV posted once about sharing, that a worker he knew was happy to take it to a family that needed and wanted it.
And all the decades I lived in apartments, it was a rare but welcome event when someone brought in garden produce to share in the break room at work...a real gift, gracious and anonymous!
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I find the wilted cucumber salad (salt them to remove bitterness, then sugar and vinegar) keeps well in the refigerator. So make a big batch and keep replenishing them. In so many words, these are refrigerator pickles.

Pickles of all varieties make a great home for excess cucumbers. I think the Ball canning book usually has you over cook them. They want you to cook them to sterilize them and then seal their jars. But in pickling, the vinegar itself is a preservative. So pickles, especially crisp ones, require minimal cooking. I would not be surprised to learn that pioneers kept their pickles in covered crocks and made those pickles without cooking them.
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Here's a Thai Cucumber Salad recipe from Bruce Cost's Asian Ingredients:
[Note: Areas with Mexican/Hispanic populations often have dried shrimp in little cellophane packages in the ethnic or Latin grocery aisle. And yes you can make this without the fish sauce if you have no source for the nac phom, or don't like fermented fish.]
2 heaping tablespoos dried shrimp
2 cucumbers
1/4 cup round, thin fresh red chili pepper slices (with seeds)
3 tablespoons chopped red onion
tablespoons fresh lime juice
1 1/2 tablespoons fish sauce
2 tablespoons sugar
1 tablespoon sesame oil
1/4 c. chopped roasted or fried peanuts

using a mortar or food processor, grind the shrimp to a coarse powder.
Peel the cucumbers. Cut off the ends, cut them in half lengthwise, and scrape out the seeds. Slice them thinly into halfmoons. Place the cucumbers in a bowl along with the chili slices and ono. Add the ground shrimp, lime juice, fish sauce, sugar, and sesame oil, and toss well. Allow to sit or serve immediately, sprinkled with the peanuts.
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One of my gardening books also has a recipe using overripe cucumbers for soup (not gazpacho), but it calls for a blender or processor; another mentions the possibilities of stuffing them, as with deviled egg, etc. And the previous post about stirfrying them after peeling is right--they are a good addition to stirfry. Let me know if you want the mentioned recipes; if so, I can post them next week.
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I would not be surprised to learn that pioneers kept their pickles in covered crocks and made those pickles without cooking them.

You've never spent much time in New England, have you?? NE is a time warp and you will find things there that you thought had been wiped from the face of the earth. I remember the "pickle barrels" in a couple small stores when I was a kid. When we went up there two weeks ago, we went to a drive-in. Bet you thought those were all gone, too.
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Let me know if you want the mentioned recipes; if so, I can post them next week.

Please!! Especially the ones using overripe cukes. We went on vacation and my neighbor does not know what a "pickling cuke" is as opposed to a regular store bought cuke. Some of my pickling cukes are almost a foot long!!
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My cucumber harvest for both Chinese cucumbers and Straight Eight cucumbers just started about two weeks ago. They haven't had a chance to get overripe yet as I've been snacking on them like apples in the fall, so I haven't tried the overripe recipe yet. (Please remind me next week if I've forgotten to post the other recipes--juggling finishing two larger projects and starting three smaller ones right now.)

From Joy Larkcom's Oriental Vegetables:

Cucumber Soup

This is a good way to use up over-ripe cucumbers.
Peel cucumbers, remove seeds and cut into small pieces. Liquidize in a blender or food processor with seasoning, finely chopped onion to taste and just enough water to give the consistency you refer.

Chill and serve in glass bowls, pouring over a trickle of single cream or a spoonful of creamy yoghurt. Add chopped parsley to garnish.

PS. I'm not sure what single cream is--perhaps one of the British or gourmet or more experienced cooks could enlighten us?
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Hey Finn

Try this link for cucumber rings.

http://soar.berkeley.edu/recipes/pickles/recipe288.rec

HTH
alf12
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Another vote for Cucumber Soup, but my version calls for substantially more yogurt for a creamy texture & sourness to contrast with the cukes. It's incredibly cooling on a hot day. I made up the recipe last time trying to imitate something I'd had in a Greek deli, so this is not exact, but here are the guidelines:

3-4 cucumbers, peeled, seeded & roughly chopped (enough to yield 3-4 cups)
1 large container (16 oz) plain or low-fat plain yogurt (not fat free)
1 T. lemon juice
1/2. t. white vinegar
1 t. sugar
2-3 T. dill

Put cucumber & yogurt into blender & blend on low setting until mixed. Add other ingredients to taste.

The sugar is very important but should be masked by enough lemon juice & vinegar that you don't really taste it. I think the dill is key too.

Enjoy!

Protomolly.
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