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Author: daFlufferNut Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 21259  
Subject: culinary crimes Date: 8/17/2007 1:29 PM
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Why would anyone take a lovely piece of fish, roll it in breading with enough cayenne to set a city block and what appears to be cheddar cheese on fire and deep fry it?

I like a slight burn on my food, but everyone here agrees that we are talking major conflagration. One of the folks here wondered if they wanted to stuff jalepenos and couldn't find any so...

I removed all breading and ate my lovely, flavorful fish with a little lemon juice and some dill. What a waste of good fish.

I should have been expecting it, however, after what they did to bacon and eggs <shudder>

fluff
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Author: riverlad Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 19794 of 21259
Subject: Re: culinary crimes Date: 8/17/2007 2:30 PM
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These days, there seems to be an emphasis on "hot stuff," blackened this 'n that and all sorts of devices that do nothing but disguise or at least cover up the real flavor of food. In parts of the world where refgrigeration's scarce, it's understandable that they'd use lots of spices and high heat to deal with the effects of spoilage, but to take a beautiful piece of fresh fish and nearly cremate it is nigh unto criminal.

After wading through the terribly precious recipes in some of the food magazines, I get the impression that the writers are more concerned with impressing us with their vast knowledge of obscure ingredients than they are in helping to broaden our culinary horizons in a meaningful way.

Here in coastal New England, we're fortunate to have a good supply of very fresh fish and the best cooks are those that can celebrate that abundance with simple preparations that enhance, rather than disguise the inherent flavors. I had a chat this morning with a good friend who's also a commercial fisherman: he described a chowder he recently made with some extra striped bass that involved nothing more than the fish, potatoes and onions cooked in water flavored with the cooking water from their first-course steamed clams. Mmmmmm!

Cooking like that's an additive, rather than subtractive process, but wouldn't make the grade in the ever-so-sophisticated and expensive new restaurants that seem forever challenged to see how many disparate ingredients they can combine and how how they can pile it on a tiny plate. Grrrrr!

Dick

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Author: FordLove Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 19795 of 21259
Subject: Re: culinary crimes Date: 8/17/2007 2:33 PM
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I should have been expecting it, however, after what they did to bacon and eggs <shudder>


What did they do to them?

As for fish, mum used to do all sorts of things to fluke and flounder as Dad brought them home at least 3 times a week.

Ok, never that much cayanne.
Although to be honest, I don't think our cayanne was that hot.

Ford

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Author: daFlufferNut Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 19796 of 21259
Subject: Re: culinary crimes Date: 8/17/2007 2:36 PM
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It might have been ground pequin chilis. They were very red, at any rate. I wonder if they were reaching for paprika and grabbed the wrong thing...

As for the bacon and eggs, well, I didn't think green chicken eggs existed outside of Green Eggs and Ham and while I like my bacon crisp bacon briquettes don't work.

Fluff
who asks that everyone excuse her spelling, she was raised by wolves.

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Author: SRHCB Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 19797 of 21259
Subject: Re: culinary crimes Date: 8/17/2007 2:44 PM
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RE: Fluff: "who asks that everyone excuse her spelling, she was raised by wolves"

You mean "wolfs"?

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Author: daFlufferNut Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 19798 of 21259
Subject: Re: culinary crimes Date: 8/17/2007 2:47 PM
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possible. or perhaps woofes.

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Author: joikim Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 19799 of 21259
Subject: Re: culinary crimes Date: 8/17/2007 3:52 PM
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Where are these crimes taking place (so we can all avoid it)?
JK

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Author: daFlufferNut Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 19800 of 21259
Subject: Re: culinary crimes Date: 8/17/2007 3:55 PM
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Central CT.

this particular area is a little thin on good eats. Which is why I've taken classes on Carribean, Thai and Tuscan cuisine. Which reminds me, must hit Sur La Table to see what this and next month's offerings are...I'm overdue for a hands on learning session.

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Author: mzladyjake Three stars, 500 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 19801 of 21259
Subject: Re: culinary crimes Date: 8/19/2007 1:37 AM
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I LOVE blackened fish - particularily redfish!

Done right, it enhances the flavor - not masking it...

Chili picaynes are not to my knowledge used in the blackening process. Eaten raw they will give you severe burns and cause you to drink tons of beer to revive your taste buds...

Been there, done that...

LJ

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Author: daFlufferNut Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 19802 of 21259
Subject: Re: culinary crimes Date: 8/19/2007 8:13 AM
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I love blackened fish too! Especially a good cat fish.

Trust me, this was just nasty. I wondered if the cook was hung over.

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