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Author: stevenjklein Big funky green star, 20000 posts Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 21259  
Subject: Edible Stories: A Novel in Sixteen Parts Date: 7/24/2012 4:16 PM
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I just came across a mention of this food-related novel: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1594484880/ref=as_li_ss_tl?...

It was described as "a collection of 16 interrelated stories, each named after (and starring) a certain kind of food."

The chapters are:
Red Sea Salt
Hot Dog
Muffins
Orangina
Bean Curd [This is tofu, no?]
The Icing on the Cake
The Soup
Osetra
Crème Brûlée
Expresso
Menudo
Cholent
Boudin
Hot Pot
Belons
Margaret

I never heard of several of these. Wikipedia tells me that Osetra is caviar, and Boudin is sausage.

Wikipedia never heard of Hot Pot or Belons, but a quick google search indicates the former is a Chinese version of fondue, and the latter refers to Oysters.

I'm pretty sure there's no food item called Margaret, so maybe the description I saw was off a bit.
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Author: NoIDAtAll Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 21196 of 21259
Subject: Re: Edible Stories: A Novel in Sixteen Parts Date: 7/25/2012 9:30 AM
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Wikipedia never heard of Hot Pot...

Wikipedia does cover "Hot Pot", and "Shabu-Shabu", a Japanese version, Steven:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hot_pot

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shabu-shabu

Great stuff!!

a Chinese version of fondue

There is really very little resemblance to Fondue, except for the heated center table common pot. Fondue tends to use cheeses in the center pot. Hot Pot tends to use a broth. A LOT of vegetables are used in Hot Pot. I haven't seen that in Fondue. Usually, side dipping sauces, usually with a base of soy sauce and garlic, chives, chopped ginger root, chopped cilantro and chopped hot peppers are used in conjunction with Hot Pot. I haven't seen that in Fondue, in a (separate) dipping sauce - except for, perhaps, chopped hot peppers, chopped green onions and chopped garlic, but those, generally, would be added to the melted cheese in the center pot, rather than used as a side dipping sauce.

Bob

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Author: stevenjklein Big funky green star, 20000 posts Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 21197 of 21259
Subject: Re: Edible Stories: A Novel in Sixteen Parts Date: 7/25/2012 5:50 PM
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Wikipedia does cover "Hot Pot", …

Not if you spell Pot with a capital P (like you and I both did): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hot_Pot

Sounds tasty!

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Author: NoIDAtAll Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 21198 of 21259
Subject: Re: Edible Stories: A Novel in Sixteen Parts Date: 7/26/2012 6:41 AM
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Not if you spell Pot with a capital P (like you and I both did): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hot_Pot

Curiously, that's the way I spelled it in their search engine w/o a problem... dunno.


Sounds tasty!

It is, plus it's a healthy meal and a very fun thing to do with family and/or friends. I never pass up a chance to share hot pot with my Asian friends. Napa cabbage or Bok Choy, Rice Noodles, Beansprouts and Tofu are common vegetables added to the broth on an as needed basis. Meats commonly include thinly sliced Beef, Chicken, Shrimp (usually in the shell), Scallops and sometimes Crap Legs and maybe some Jiaozi (though you would omit the last, as they're usually made with ground pork as an ingredient, or maybe substitute a kreplach.) I much prefer homemade shells in Asian dumplings over using something like store bought wonton skins. http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://1.bp.blogspot.com.... The dipping sauces are phenomenal.

Bob

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Author: stevenjklein Big funky green star, 20000 posts Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 21199 of 21259
Subject: Re: Edible Stories: A Novel in Sixteen Parts Date: 7/26/2012 4:23 PM
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I didn't actually search Wikipedia; I just typed in the URL.

Next time, I'll try search!

maybe some Jiaozi (though you would omit the last, as they're usually made with ground pork

Actually, I'd also omit the Shrimp, Scallops, and Crap Legs. Like pork, shellfish also aren't kosher.

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Author: NoIDAtAll Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 21200 of 21259
Subject: Re: Edible Stories: A Novel in Sixteen Parts Date: 7/26/2012 9:45 PM
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Actually, I'd also omit the Shrimp, Scallops, and Crap Legs.

I'm pretty sure I'd omit Crap Legs, too, now that I reread my post. ~ ~

Like pork, shellfish also aren't kosher.

I didn't know that.

I read a couple of recipes for Kreplach. I might try making some of that someday - The pictures and the recipes I read looked pretty interesting.

Bob

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