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Author: streetstupid Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 6836  
Subject: Experts? Date: 6/21/2010 4:12 PM
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"The Misconception: Wine is a complicated elixir, full of subtle flavors only an expert can truly distinguish, and experienced tasters are impervious to deception.
The Truth: Wine experts and consumers can be fooled by altering their expectations."


Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/columnists/carroll/#ixzz0rWIoQAhv

Fortunately my attitude regarding "expert" was fixed at the age of 18 when the "expert" at my high school told me that with my poor academic record I should apply to one or more of the schools on his list and forget about my first choice which would never accept me. All the schools he recommended rejected me. My choice, which I stubbornly applied to anyway, accepted me. Had I relied on the "expert" I would not have been accepted to college.
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Author: WyneFool Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 6791 of 6836
Subject: Re: Experts? Date: 6/22/2010 3:43 PM
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I agree with the article as written. That is why when I do tastings all wines are in numbered brown paper bags. Anyone who has been through one of my classes knows I don't put them in $$ order but pick some esoteric thing like tannin content, sugar levels or alcohol levels.

And yes even "experts" can be fooled no matter the field.

WyneFool

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