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Author: stevenjklein Big funky green star, 20000 posts Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 21259  
Subject: filet américain Date: 5/31/2012 1:24 PM
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If there were a "gestalt of not cooking," this food item might belong there: http://www.theworld.org/2012/05/the-americain-dream/

Apparently it's quite popular in Belgium, but you couldn't get me to try it.

Excerpt:

The filet, however, holds a special place in the Belgian stomach. Pearl-laden octogenarians daintily slide it onto forks in five star restaurants. Postmen slip into one of Brussels’ famed “brown cafes” for a quick filet (and a Leffe blonde, bien sûr) between deliveries. Youthful office workers glide out of sandwich shops toting their Martinos. Roofers and plumbers pull homemade américain baguettes out of their packs during their regular smoke breaks.
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Author: voelkels Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 21189 of 21259
Subject: Re: filet américain Date: 6/4/2012 7:12 AM
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If there were a "gestalt of not cooking," this food item might belong there: http://www.theworld.org/2012/05/the-americain-dream/

Apparently it's quite popular in Belgium, but you couldn't get me to try it.


Back in the mid 60s, when I was working in Greenland, we would fly to Copenhagen for vacations. There was a restaurant there called “Oscar Davidson’s” that had a sandwich menu that was about 4 1/2 feet long (See; http://www.idadavidsen.dk/index.php?page=9 ). There was a number of sandwiches on that menu that contained raw beef. One of my favorites consisted of a thick slice of buttered white bread that was covered with raw ground beast and sprinkled with diced onion and capers. In the center was a raw onion ring that had a raw chicken egg’s yolk in it. To eat it you sprinkled on salt & pepper, broke the yolk and spread it over the meat and ate the sandwich using a knife & fork. Yum!
;-)

C.J.V. - thems were the good old days, yes

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Author: voelkels Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 21190 of 21259
Subject: Re: filet américain Date: 6/12/2012 12:37 PM
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From N’Orleans restaurant critic and author Tom Fitzmorris’s “The New Orleans Menu” today (6/12/12) (See; http://www.nomenu.com/joomla1/ but it’ll be gone after today).

Steak Tartare

Steak tartare has gone out of vogue, largely due to the efforts of the food terrorists (to use Julia Child's expression) who say we should eat little beef and no raw proteins. Bushwah. Life is full of risks much worse than this one. Even people who don't like the idea of eating raw beef often come around after they taste it. The dish (known in Europe as "beef Americaine" or "steak cannibale") must be prepared to order. In restaurants, the classic style was to do it at tableside, but that's become very rare (pun intended).

The seasoning of steak tartare is open to the tastes of the eater. However, certain ingredients should never find their way into a steak tartare. They include mayonnaise, ketchup, garlic, and any dried herbs. The salt should be kosher salt or sea salt, and the pepper should be freshly and coarsely ground. Both of the latter produce little grains of flavor in the midst of the beef.

The cut of beef is important. I go back and forth between tenderloin butts (which don't make very good steaks) and top or inside round (not eye of round). Chop it yourself. You may also grind it, but that's not classic. I would advise against buying pre-ground beef for this.

2 egg yolks
3 Tbs. chopped white onions
3 Tbs. very small capers
6 sprigs parsley, leaves only, chopped
6 anchovies, roughly chopped
1 Tbs. Creole mustard
2 tsp. Worcestershire sauce
2 tsp. Tabasco Caribbean style steak sauce (or Pickapeppa) . . . .

. . . . 12 oz. tenderloin butt ends, or round steak


I would post the rest of the recipe but it may be against the Fool’s policy, so y’all will have to go to Tom’s website.
;-)

C.J.V. - stole lots of good recipes from there, me

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Author: stevenjklein Big funky green star, 20000 posts Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 21191 of 21259
Subject: Re: filet américain Date: 6/12/2012 2:06 PM
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tenderloin butts (which don't make very good steaks) and top or inside round…

That gives me my excuse to not try it; those cuts aren't available from kosher butchers in the US. (Well, perhaps kosher butchers in New York offer it, I doubt even that.)

I would post the rest of the recipe but it may be against the Fool’s policy…

Go ahead and post it. Recipes aren't protected by copyright. From the website of the US Copyright Office:
opyright law does not protect recipes that are mere listings of ingredients. Nor does it protect other mere listings of ingredients such as those found in formulas, compounds, or prescriptions. Copyright protection may, however, extend to substantial literary expression—a description, explanation, or illustration, for example—that accompanies a recipe or formula or to a combination of recipes, as in a cookbook.
http://www.copyright.gov/fls/fl122.html

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Author: voelkels Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 21192 of 21259
Subject: Re: filet américain Date: 6/12/2012 5:11 PM
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"tenderloin butts (which don't make very good steaks) and top or inside round…"

That gives me my excuse to not try it; those cuts aren't available from kosher butchers in the US. (Well, perhaps kosher butchers in New York offer it, I doubt even that.)


"I would post the rest of the recipe but it may be against the Fool’s policy…"

Go ahead and post it. Recipes aren't protected by copyright.

Maybe so, but I have, in the past, had posts pulled by the folk at the Fool (mostly in the U.K. but also in the U.S.) because it may have infringed on someone’s copyright. In the case of Tom’s website & recipes, as long as I tell you where it came from and his website’s address, he was more than happy for me to post it on-line.

Axe-u-lee, I have, IMHO, a more interesting “recipe” for “Salmon Tartare”, which was originally published in “The Times-Picayune” newspaper by Cajun cook & author Marcelle Bienvenu just before New Years that I “Scandahovinized” from the original.
;-)

C.J.V. - if you want her original “recipe” and my variation on it, I can post that for y’all, me

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Author: stevenjklein Big funky green star, 20000 posts Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 21193 of 21259
Subject: Re: filet américain Date: 6/12/2012 7:45 PM
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but it’ll be gone after today

It's still there: http://www.nomenu.com/joomla1/index.php?option=com_content&a...

And since the US Copyright Office says recipes aren't copyright-able (see here: http://www.copyright.gov/fls/fl122.html), I'll post the recipe:

2 egg yolks
3 Tbs. chopped white onions
3 Tbs. very small capers
6 sprigs parsley, leaves only, chopped
6 anchovies, roughly chopped
1 Tbs. Creole mustard
2 tsp. Worcestershire sauce
2 tsp. Tabasco Caribbean style steak sauce (or Pickapeppa)
1 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil
1 tsp. kosher or sea salt
1/2 tsp. freshly ground black pepper
12 oz. tenderloin butt ends, or round steak

1. Combine everything except the beef in a large bowl. If you're doing this at the table, a wooden salad bowl is best.

2. Slice the beef about a quarter-inch thick. Using a meat mallet, pound it until it becomes quite thin. Then chop it with a sharp French chef's knife on a wooden cutting board.

3. Put the beef into the bowl and, with two large forks, blend the seasoning ingredients with the beef. Check the seasonings, and add salt and pepper as needed. Form the beef into a fanciful pattern on the plate for a dramatic effect. Or not.

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Author: voelkels Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 21194 of 21259
Subject: Re: filet américain Date: 6/13/2012 9:03 AM
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"but it’ll be gone after today"

It's still there: http://www.nomenu.com/joomla1/index.php?option=com_content&a......


That is a slightly different page than the original. Occasionally, Tom will post a recipe in his daily menu that doesn’t wind up in that area or, if it does, can’t be found. A recipe for Tartare that you could eat, Steven, was posted By Marcelle Bienvenu in The Times-Picayune at http://www.nola.com/food/index.ssf/2011/12/salmon_tartare_2.... . I substitute fresh dill for the mint and Danish akvavit (See; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akvavit ) for the vodka. Since I broke a bridge last summer and had a couple of implants put in, I can’t chew anything hard so I eat it on mini-slices of “Jewish” rye bread.
;-(

C.J.V. - Hopefully I’ll get a new bridge this Fall, me

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