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As someone who clearly not a musician and musically challenged with a curiosity about this stuff I hear, I stumbled across this tool this late night.

http://www.shockwave-sound.com/tools/tap-BPM-tempo.html

Find the BPM tempo of a music track by tapping the beat on your mouse or keyboard. The longer you keep tapping the rhythm, the more accurate / reliable your tempo will be measured.

Tonight, I have a current pop club song stuck in my head today. According to the above site, I tapped for a full 100 taps (the maximum) and the BPM tempo of the song appears to be 129 BPM. (If anyone is interested, the club song stuck in my head is "Scream and Shout" by Will.I.Am; not normally my cup of tea, but in my head.)

And I note it has been 4 1/2 years since I've been on this board when I took a MUS101 class. I miss learning about music and learning (practicing) to listen with new ears.

Thanks,
ST
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And I note it has been 4 1/2 years since I've been on this board when I took a MUS101 class. I miss learning about music and learning (practicing) to listen with new ears.

No reason you can't pick it up again, right? Tonight, I have my first piano lesson in probably 25 years. I've been looking forward to this for weeks.
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No reason you can't pick it up again, right? Tonight, I have my first piano lesson in probably 25 years. I've been looking forward to this for weeks.

How was your piano lesson? :)

True, no reason I can't study music on my own, but I enjoyed the formal collegiate setting. As undisciplined as I am, surprisingly I thrive nicely in a classroom. I think it helps me to focus. I would love to take a MUS class again.

ST
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How was your piano lesson? :)

There is much to learn. She was impressed with the one song I know (Mozart's Turkish March) but that song is an island. There's nothing behind it besides muscle memory and if I make a mistake I have no idea where to go.

During the second lesson (when I asked her how long it would take before I could learn Beethoven's Pathetique Sonata) she said she applauded my fire but said I am not ready for that. So she's got me playing every sharp major scale with just two fingers, all the harmonic triads, etc.

This week was an off week, end of the last semester, so I've got two weeks to practice before my next lesson. Practice makes better!

Meanwhile I learned the first few chords to Pathetique on the sly.
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I took 3 years of piano in college music school, but that ended in 1996 and I've forgotten most of it. But I do remember that if I put in a half hour a day, I kept up very well. But if I skipped a day, then it was a pain trying to put in an hour the following day, or even worse, 90 minutes after skipping two days.

On my main instrument now, I haven't missed a day for a couple years. Most days I practice for a couple hours (spread out over several sessions throughout the day), but I always play for at least a few minutes, even on vacation or staying at my in-laws or whatever. I keep a journal of what I play every day, and if I have a good day, I know what led up to it so I can keep doing it. Likewise, it helps me avoid bad days. I think of my skills as a balloon; when I practice I bump the balloon upward, but after a few hours, it stops rising and then starts to fall. After a couple days off, it's falling fast. It's no fun trying to climb out of a hole after not having played for several days. If I find myself playing with weekend warriors for whatever reason, I realize that many of them only play one or two days a week, and so they're *always* trying to climb out of a hole. They may not even know what it feels like to have a good day.
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I keep a journal of what I play every day, and if I have a good day, I know what led up to it so I can keep doing it. Likewise, it helps me avoid bad days.

That's a great idea, and something I am going to start myself.


It's no fun trying to climb out of a hole after not having played for several days. If I find myself playing with weekend warriors for whatever reason, I realize that many of them only play one or two days a week, and so they're *always* trying to climb out of a hole. They may not even know what it feels like to have a good day.

As much as the saying "Practice makes perfect" gets thrown around, it's surprising how so many people don't recognize its simple truth. Every day, at least a little bit, no excuses. Pretty soon you forget what it was like when you couldn't play through that hard part.
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playing every sharp major scale with just two fingers

... why?
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I guess to emphasize the scales over the fingering. She had me play the minor harmonic scales with two *different* fingers. I stopped taking the lessons after the semester ended... Lost my momentum in the Spring. I'd like to get back into it now that winter is coming.
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I guess to emphasize the scales over the fingering. She had me play the minor harmonic scales with two *different* fingers.
Interesting!

I grew up playing piano (started at 4yrs old) and kept it up in one form or another for the past 25 years. Have fun with it!
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I grew up playing piano (started at 4yrs old) and kept it up in one form or another for the past 25 years. Have fun with it!

I also had lessons from that age, and hated them. Wish I had enjoyed them more. I tried again in college, developed perfect pitch, but got kicked out of the music department... for not practicing my keyboard enough. Story of my life: unapplied talent.

I really need to just put that keyboard back on my table and put 30 minutes a day into it without fail. It seems like starting over at this point... again.
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I tried again in college, developed perfect pitch



I thought we were born with that.
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I thought we were born with that.

Thats's what they say, and I'm sure there is some innate talent you must be born with. But you aren't born knowing what a half step is, or that 440 hz means "A" in our particular lexicon. I got to the point where, sometime after I traded my chromatic tuner in for a tuning fork and a bag of pot, I could reliably tune my guitar exactly before sounding the fork to check it. And I could tell you what key a song was in without trying very hard. And the interval tests they put us through, a lot of people struggled through, were a breeze for me. I wasn't born with that, and I couldn't do it now. I figured at the time it was because I was so surrounded by the subject.

Maybe you just call that a good ear :)
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Pretty sure it's an inborn ability, it's just that you have to learn what the pitches are called, which can be forgotten and then re-remembered. The ability to learn it at all is perfect pitch.
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