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I know, and I think it was SWR was looking for a recipe for FGT, durned if I can remember the board if I"m not sure of the requester. However this is a good board to share with, you can't imagine the agony I went through on this with my beloved recipe board. (That's not sarcasm, I LOVE the recipe board).

The Agongy and the Ecstasy

There are 2 ways of making FGT and you can try them both, with no extra work in the same session w/ no extra work:

Proportional adjust for the # of tomatos

tomatos sliced 1/4 - 3/8 thick
1 portion flour
1 portion cornmeal (stoneground yellow by my choice. . . . )
(season both, I use salt and coarse ground black pepper)
eggs and milk scrambled together equal proportions like 2 eggs and 1/2 cup milk, think french toast)

Method one:

dredge slices in flour, then egg/milk, then in cornmeal and fry.

Method two:

Decide method one is too much work and dump flour, cornmeal, egg/milk together to make a thick batter, dip to coat and fry.

Lazy Ravy prefers method two.

Rav
Red eye gravy anyone? ;) Anyone have a good directions (ummmm, maybe that's another distinction between here and the recipe board, we want directions on something rather than recipes) for beaten biscuits, that doesn't involve a machine?

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for beaten biscuits, that doesn't involve a machine?

Or bisquick? I used to be a counselor for a camp and we would take the kids out to this homesteader's house on the land to introduce them to the area. One of the activities was to make biscuits. We'd pack along pre-measured bisquick, add water to the plastic baggie, knead the dough in the baggie, then cook the biscuits in the wood stove.

I guess they figured starting the stove, managing kids, and cooking over wood were challenges enough without adding cleaning mixing bowls, etc. out of a well on top of it all!

Speaking of which... I know there's a little gizmo you can get for a camp stove that will let you bake over a flame burner. I'm sure this isn't a new idea. Any thoughts on other ways to do this? In the scouts, my brother baked by putting batter in a dutch oven under the fire.

- KK

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Or bisquick?

KK,

Rav is grinning. I use bisquick in a rush, not that making biscuits from scratch is time consuming, it's just that I use buttermilk which I don't count as a stable.

However, beaten biscuits are an unusual southern from of biscuits which requires folding and "beating" enough to make croissants look like a piece of cake. I recall reading somewhere of a machine that you fed the dough through kinda like the wringers of a washing machine. Otherwise like using a maple dowl to beat it with. What I can't remember are the guidelines and differnces from basic biscuit dough.

Ummmm, perhaps I should google, but I get much more interesting responses on the boards than I do through google.

Rav
am I forgiven for taking advantage of you?
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am I forgiven for taking advantage of you?

Ohh! You cad! I'll give you a <yah!> and a <hi-yah!> for that!

No, seriously, I appreciate the clarification. I was trying to make sense out of words I knew (beaten biscuits) but had never seen together.

- KK
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LOL! Yes Rav it was me. On GOLP, back when we were trying to get this board into existence. <G>


Thanks!
StarWarrior-Rie
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LOL! Yes Rav it was me. On GOLP, back when we were trying to get this board into existence. <G>



LOL There are at least 5 boards that have great recipes on them and I was thinking it was you, but durned if I could remember where. I figured this was as good a place as any it.

Rav
Who bought green tomatos for frying either tonight or tomorrow.
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Well Rav:

My Southern recollection of beaten biscuits seems to be that it is a little more flour, a little less fat (butter, lard, shortening, etc.), so you don't get that classic "sticky" biscuit dough. Then you just ignore the old advice about not over-working the biscuit dough. On the contrary, you work the hell out of it 'til it almost feels like bread dough. Voila! You have those little rock-like things that are, to my mind, good for just one thing: sopping.
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Hi, Rav--

Here's a recipe for beaten biscuits from one of my favorite cookbooks, I Hear America Cooking, by Betty Fussell:

http://boards.fool.com/Message.asp?mid=12171014

Madeline
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Here's a recipe for beaten biscuits from one of my favorite cookbooks

Thanks, I can't argue with TMFBofa, he's my boss. ;) However, even bosses can cook. ;) Opinionated as they may be. Though the dough you described is contrary to what he discribes, but the technique is right on the mark.

Rav sighes, he's gonna have to experiment. Such a chore to have to work things out by trial and error. Worse comes to worse I'll bring Bofa some hockey pucks and sausage gray, so he can sop.

Rav
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