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Has anyone read The Ages of Gaia: A Biography of Our Living Earth by James Lovelock ? There are some interesting reviews on amazon.com. I'm going to add it to my reading list.

From one reviewer: James Lovelock offers the outlines of an intriguing "physiology" of earth. Together with Lynn Margulis, he first seriously proposed that microbial life regulates key aspects of the Earth's physical environment, most notably the composition of the atmosphere. The scale of his insight affords him unusual insight into many controversial areas: ozone depletion as threat to life (nope), the prospect of life on Mars (nil), why life must "infect" a planet if it is to have a chance of persisting on a geologic time scale.

Food for thought.

tngirl
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I'm going to add it to my reading list.

My life is not that structured that I have a reading list :o). Usually finish a book and the look for another at that time. Currently trying to finish "The Four Pillars of Investing".

I have heard of the Gaia theory and found it interesting... a sort of symbiotic, earth-as-a-living-colony idea (a true Mother Earth). It does sound cool and it's interesting how people like that can get so far out of the every day plane of reality to look at things with such a different view. I remember Sagan touching on this in his popular Cosmos series on PBS years ago.
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Welcome back, by the way. I figured you must have went down to help with the bailing-out of NO....
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Welcome back, by the way. I figured you must have went down to help with the bailing-out of NO....

I'm much too selfish for that. I had computer problems, both parents with health issues and a spoiled brat younger sister threatening suicide - again. When I stand back and look at my family, I'm just amazed that made it to a wonderfully rational spot in my little corner of the universe.

I haven't watched TV in years so I miss out on a lot of theories.

tngirl

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My life is not that structured that I have a reading list :o). Usually finish a book and then look for another at that time. Currently trying to finish "The Four Pillars of Investing".

Here are 5 more I recently tumbled upon. I really want to read the one on baseball. I have only watched on 1 occasion each "The Rangers" and "The Astros" and have zero knowledge of the profession, the players, etc., but put dollars and cents into the picture and I become interested. :-)

As long as I'm reading something positive or connected to problem solving, I find it helps keep my sense of life from dropping into the toilet. Over the weekend on the REHP they had a link to pictures of the anti-war crowd which included many members of the Communist Party. With so many soldiers having given their lives for our freedom, the idea of a Communist Party in the USA just sticks in my crawl. To remove the gunk stuck, I read about heroes who have changed the course of the world with their intellect. For a quick fix, I have a PowerPoint presentation on the Navy Angels with the theme from Top Gun playing. Just watching the brilliance of man's ability to create and fly with such precision and accuracy is most uplifting. If anyone would like a copy, I will be happy to forward it. If all else falls, I watch the movie Patton.

Moneyball by Michael Lewis - Lewis tells the engaging story of how the Oakland Athletics have managed to field a pennant contender on one of the lowest budgets in baseball by embracing a scientific revolution in the evaluation of baseball talent, tactics, and strategy.

Skunk Works by Ben R. Rich and Leo Janos - Rich provides a first hand account of how Lockheed Aviation's Skunk Works filled the skies with a succession of radically innovative, remarkably effective warbirds.

Slide Rule by Nevil Shute - Novelist Nevil Shute had an earlier career as an aeronautical engineer. In "Slide Rule", he details his company's efforts to produce an airship, the R100, in "competition" with the State of England.

Louis Pasteur: Free Lance of Science by Rene Dubos - A distinguished microbiologist and intellectual historian of biology, Dubos' essentialized, sympathetic portrait of Pasteur's career is set against the backdrop of the triumph of the germ theory of life over spontaneous generation and the triumph of biochemistry over the vitalist school of life.

Edison: the Man who Made the Future by Ronald Clark - A superb, compact biography of the inventor. Among the gems in this brief biography: Edison's iron ore enhancement plant as inspiration for Henry Ford's idea of a "production flow"-- the assembly line, rather than batch jobs.

tngirl
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Tngirl, the more I read your posts, the more I am very impressed by you. Very impressive.....given your list of readings, if you ever need any background info on the nuts and bolts of baseball or aerospace engineering, let me know.
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