No. of Recommendations: 1
Sorta makes you wounder just what kind of "thorough" vetting was accomplished prior to his appointment as CIA director!

[I have always considered the FBI to have the investigative acumen of Barney Fife!]

sunray
a man who wonders why morality is so poorly valued these days
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"a man who wonders why morality is so poorly valued these days"

I believe it is in large part because people no longer value nor fear the God who gave His people the 10 commandments, which includes...

“You shall not commit adultery.

Ken
a man who has regretfully committed his share of sins and has finally asked his savior, Jesus Christ, to forgive him.
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The president couldn't past the Clearance Background check.
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It is more wide spread than I would like to think with the top military brass. Recent examples include:

Former 173rd Commander:
http://www.stripes.com/news/former-173rd-commander-handed-re...

Former 82nd DCO:
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/28/us/decorated-general-charg...

Former AFRICOM CDR Not related to adultery but applies to ethics and setting the example:
http://www.stripes.com/news/ward-unlikely-to-face-court-mart...

Former USAREUR CDR (no reason given for retirement):
http://www.stripes.com/news/hertling-leaves-usareur-without-...

Discussion at work also included the number of Navy O5/O6's relieved in the past couple years, but since I am not in the Navy, I won't further comment.

Interesting times, but is it demonstrably different from the past (other than actual punishment for top brass is much more common than in the past)?

Sam
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http://news.yahoo.com/current-petraeus-affair-nothing-nation...

"The current sex scandal involving the C.I.A., the F.B.I., the military, and possibly several private citizens isn’t the first in Washington, but it has some things in common with the huge scandal that hit Alexander Hamilton more than 200 years ago.

The Maria Reynolds affair was the David Petraeus-Paula Broadwell-John Allen triangle of its day in the 1790s, with its admission of adultery, scandalous mail exchanges, and a high-profile resignation.

The Hamilton scandal also involved some elements that have nothing in common with the current situation: blackmail, a potential Founding Fathers duel, and a key role by two future U.S. presidents, Thomas Jefferson and James Monroe.

And Aaron Burr, the man who eventually killed Hamilton in 1804, made two cameo appearances as the events unfolded.

In the 1790s, Hamilton was arguably the second- or third-most powerful politician in the United States, after his mentor, Washington, and Hamilton’s arch-enemy, Jefferson.

But Hamilton had many foes due to his aggressive role in government. Hamilton had started the first political party in the nation, the Federalists and battled leaders within his own party as well as Jefferson and his followers.

Hamilton became the first treasury secretary of the United States in 1789 and was President Washington’s most-trusted adviser. But he resigned in early 1795, reportedly to seek a lucrative private sector career working as a lawyer in New York.

But Hamilton was harboring a secret.

During Washington’s first term in office, Secretary Hamilton started an affair in 1791 with Maria Reynolds, a Philadelphia woman seeking money to leave her abusive husband and return to New York.

Unknown to Hamilton, Reynolds’ husband knew of the affair. James Reynolds forced the married Hamilton to pay him blackmail if he wanted to continue the liaison. Hamilton did.

James Reynolds was then caught in a separate financial scheme and tried to implicate Hamilton in that plot in 1792. The speaker of the House, Frederick Muhlenberg; Monroe; and a third Congress member confronted Hamilton.

Not only did the treasury secretary confirm the affair, Hamilton also handed over much of his mail correspondence with Reynolds to the men. The letters apparently proved that Hamilton wasn’t involved in the second financial scheme involving Reynolds.

Monroe and Muhlenberg agreed to keep the incident quiet, but Jefferson may have known of the affair. Monroe had given copies of the letters and records of the meetings with Hamilton to John Beckley, the clerk of the House of Representatives, to be sealed.

Five year later, Beckley was fired as House clerk by the Federalists, and all of the papers were suddenly made public in 1797 in what we would call a tabloid publication run by Philadelphia publisher James Callender."
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This whole thing appears to be Much Ado About Nothing!

I think whom GEN P was banging is a matter of discussion between (among?) GEN P, his wife and the bangee! They should work it out; it doesn't warrant his resignation.

Regards,
Grumpy
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"I think whom GEN P was banging is a matter of discussion between (among?) GEN P, his wife and the bangee! "

I barely awoke, and already my vocabulary had been enriched by this wonderful new word: bangee. I shall henceforth make frequent use of it.

~aj
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No. of Recommendations: 5
In my opinion I think we should just have had R. Lee Ermey, the DI in the movie Full Metal Jacket give Petraeus a good ass chewing (What is your major malfunction Numbnuts?), take away his weekend pass and tell him to get back to work keeping America safe.------------tsimi
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It must be her intellect.


+++
+++


Cudda bin her Integrity!
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No. of Recommendations: 8
That is ridiculous. You cannot penalize someone militarily for something that happened after he/she left the service. Petraeus did not start screwing Paula Broadwell till after he had left the military, so the affair is none of the military's damn business. The CIA can penalize him if its rules provide for that, but keep the military out of it.
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