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Author: bgh327 Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 6773  
Subject: grandchildren Date: 8/11/2000 7:07 PM
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I want to start investing for my grandchildren Since I have 4, is it better to set up 4 different accounts or one account for all the children?
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Author: TMFCookie Three stars, 500 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4687 of 6773
Subject: Re: grandchildren Date: 8/12/2000 1:54 PM
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An account for each grandchild would be most clear.

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Author: RicsAst Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4688 of 6773
Subject: Re: grandchildren Date: 8/12/2000 5:29 PM
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I want to start investing for my grandchildren Since I have 4, is it better to set up 4 different accounts or one account for all the children?
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

bgh327, let me add a little to what TMFCookie said. First, what do you mean by “better”? There are two options: Better for YOU or better for your Grandchildren. Review both options and then decide.

Option 1: Better for you. The best way to go is to set up a Guardian Account. This is just an everyday, ho-hum, brokerage account that you can set up with any major discount broker (preferably on-line so as to maximize low commissions for trades). This account will be in your name and will be under your exclusive control from the time you set it up until you decide to give it to your grandkids. There is no maximum you can deposit (although gifts over $10,000 start to get the attention of the IRS…but to keep this post short, I'll skip over tax implications) You then earmark whatever percentage you want for each grandkid. You can save a ton on commission since you will only have to trade once and it will cover all portions of the account. When you pull it out, it's taxed at your rate. (OUCH!!) If you change your mind and prefer to go on a month long cruise in the Bahamas, you can always use this money for that and hope you grandkids can fend for themselves.

Option 2: Better for the Grandkids There is nothing like a sense of ownership to make sure that your grandkids keep visiting you over the holidays. You can set up a Custodial account commonly called a UGMA/UTMA account. These accounts belong to the grandkids and you can be the custodian. You treat each account separately. Hence, you would have to make 4 deposits, 4 trades, and pay 4 commissions every time. If you make your grandkids aware of their accounts, then they will know exactly how much they have saved up. You can not transfer between accounts otherwise you will be paying penalties. The accounts legally belong to the minor once they are of legal age in their state of residency. (If you keep it a secret from them, then you can transfer it whenever you want to, but the account belongs to them and you could not legally pull out any money for your own personal use) Once you do decide to transfer the account, the money is taxed at the kids rate. (If George W. is Prez, that rate will drop down to 10% for most 18 to 21 year olds)

Reccomendation: It's really up to you. The very fact that you are asking this question and you hang out in the Motley Fool means that you are probably one those caring, nurturing type of grandparent. (The other kind would have spent all the money on themselves by now and would be asking the grandkids for money) I would suggest that you make the extra effort and pay a little more on commissions and set up a Custodial Account for each grandkid to start. As they become adolescents, make them aware of it and offer any assistance in helping them become more aware of financial matters. Help teach them the responsibility that they need to grow up, manage their own account, and not become a burden on their parents.

Don't just give them money, give them the gift of learning how to manage the account themselves. (You can start teaching them as soon as they are old enough to know the difference between a penny and a quarter)

Hope this helps,

Rics

PS: Before the DRiP police comment on this post, I wanted to recommend something as simple as possible before expanding to different forms of reducing Commissions. Then again, with BUYandHOLD.com, the commissions are low enough to make the pain of setting up a DRiP account a non-issue. (NOTE: I do not use BUYandHOLD.com, but I have read good reviews of the service on this board)


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Author: jkrou Big red star, 1000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4689 of 6773
Subject: Re: grandchildren Date: 8/13/2000 11:34 AM
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One other consideration is who the accounts belong to legally. Also, depending upon your state of legal residence, even a guardian account requires transfer of assets to the grandchild at age 25.

You should consider who owns the accounts if something happens to you (your estate or the grandkids) and you are no longer able to dictate what is going on.

The Fool has a set of articles for Investing for Kids and I would also encourage you to drop by Fairmark to read their section on the same topic. www.fairmark.com

good luck and those are some lucky grandkids!

Jenn

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Author: Odee Big funky green star, 20000 posts Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4690 of 6773
Subject: Re: grandchildren Date: 8/14/2000 10:57 AM
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If setting up a custodial DRiP account, there are plenty of companies to select from that have NO FEE DRiPs. Examples: PepsiCo (PEP), Coca-Cola (KO), Johnson&Johnson (JNJ), Pfizer (PFE), Hasbro (HAS), Intel (INTC), plus many more. You may want to select a company the grandchildren could relate to (if their old enough). Check the Moneypaper at www.moneypaper.com for a list of NO FEE DRiPs.

If a DRiP is selected, you may want to purchase TMF Investing Without A Silverspoon to assist each family in DRiP education.

Odee

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Author: Shaniqua Two stars, 250 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4692 of 6773
Subject: Re: grandchildren Date: 8/14/2000 5:39 PM
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There are a lot of people who visit here and want to set up accounts for their grandchildren, nieces/nephews, even their friends' kids, without having the parents or the children ever be aware of the money. If that's your situation, don't consider a custodial account. Go with an account in your name and designate the grandchildren as the beneficiaries. Remember to update the beneficiary list as more grandchildren are born.

Ric's post was very good, but oversimplified a little. He did say he was ignoring tax consequences. But I had to add to what he said ... If you make your grandkids aware of their accounts, then they will know exactly how much they have saved up.

If you set up a custodial account (UTMA/UGMA), the grandkids will have to know after a certain point, and THEIR PARENTS will have to know (depending on child's age), since either the child or the parent is legally liable for any income taxes due on that account since it's legally their money - even if they don't know it exists. Assuming that you only purchase growth stocks that don't pay any dividends, never transfer the money, never sell any stocks, never invest in any mutual funds, and don't have any cash left in the account to earn interest after you've purchased these stocks, I suppose you wouldn't have to tell them about the account. Although I certainly wouldn't thank someone for incurring the wrath of the IRS for me.

Shaniqua (currently being audited by the IRS, so maybe I'm a little oversensitive on this aspect)

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