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I'm into my second season of growing figs in East Tennessee. I have 6 different varieties, all but one plant seems to have survived the winter. Anyone have any tips?

BJR
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BJR

Just one tip - don't move North.

I have absolutely no shot at growing figs in Northern MA. Yet I will not stop trying.

My grandfather (91) has had his fig trees going for many years (outside Newark, NJ). They are wonderful.

If I get a single fig here after many years of effort, I will consider that a sauces.

Zuzufool (Ralph)
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Ralph, you can grow smaller varieties of fig in a planter and bring it into the garage or basement for the winter.

In Brooklyn's large Italian neighborhoods, almost every house has at least one fig tree. Before winter sets in, the owners wrap their trees in old blankets, rugs, rags, newspaper, etc. and invert a pail on top to keep out as much snow or rain as possible. When it snows (if the snow is moist and sticky) these objects look like snowmen.

Trini
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Are your fig trees cold hurt? Or just not producing?

I'm in Virginia and have a fig tree growing in a sunny but sheltered spot and it sets figs at least once and and sometimes twice in a season. I don't know what kind it is, it came with the house. It's surrounded by a fence on two sides and the house on the third. It's also basically ignored until the birds feast on the figs.

Maybe yours are too exposed?



Sherry
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Trini,

I have tried bringing the trees in for the winter, also simply wrapping (which my Italian grandfather does). No sucess to date. I have managed to keep trees alive over a winter, but barely.

No quit - I haven't yet bought this year's tree.

Ralph
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