Message Font: Serif | Sans-Serif
 
UnThreaded | Threaded | Whole Thread (30) | Ignore Thread Prev | Next
Author: GregTrocchia Two stars, 250 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 3855  
Subject: Re: Bill Joy Discusses Nanotech on NPR, Wired Ma Date: 3/18/2000 6:32 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
>maria, i thought he was also concerned about the speed of replication compared to our own slower reproduction, thus our impending demise. Another point raised was the fact that as our civilization progresses, our society and culture will become so complex that only a computer ,robot, or what have you, will be able to sort through the tons of information and reach a logical solution, again rendering us somewhat obsolete...gotta go,the Borg are at the door....itch<

But, itch, changes in our bodies and hardwiring via evolution have, for at least the last 5 to 10 thousand years, been overwhelmed by our ability to adapt far more quickly via societal change and learned behavior. In addition to that, should radical improvement of the base capabilities and extension of the fundamental limits of humans be required to keep pace, MNT itself offers the possibility of doing just that as in Nanomedicine Vol 3 (yet to be published), chapter 30. I myself have always wanted to have a "math co-processor" :-)

I also point out that we have already reached the point where things are too complex for an unaided human to do some of the things we need done. For example, Federal Express would be impossible without computers. there is no way humans could keep track of that volume of packages and route them properly in the necessary time-frame. Despite not being able to manually sift through terabytes of data in real (or even near) time, I don't feel particularly obsolete. We humans have designed and built computers to do just such things and if anyone thinks that these computers don't need us even more than we need them, they haven't been on my lab floor recently (I test supercomputers for a living). Believe me, they need lots of human intervention.

Greg
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Print the post  
UnThreaded | Threaded | Whole Thread (30) | Ignore Thread Prev | Next

Announcements

Pencils of Promise - Back to School Drive
"Pencils of Promise works with communities across the globe to build schools and create programs that provide education opportunities for children."
Post of the Day:
Berkshire Hathaway

IBM: Is Buffett Wrong, or Brilliant?
What was Your Dumbest Investment?
Share it with us -- and learn from others' stories of flubs.
When Life Gives You Lemons
We all have had hardships and made poor decisions. The important thing is how we respond and grow. Read the story of a Fool who started from nothing, and looks to gain everything.
Community Home
Speak Your Mind, Start Your Blog, Rate Your Stocks

Community Team Fools - who are those TMF's?
Contact Us
Contact Customer Service and other Fool departments here.
Work for Fools?
Winner of the Washingtonian great places to work, and "#1 Media Company to Work For" (BusinessInsider 2011)! Have access to all of TMF's online and email products for FREE, and be paid for your contributions to TMF! Click the link and start your Fool career.
Advertisement