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http://www.reuters.com/article/reviewsNews/idUSN2027073520070521?pageNumber=2

In a London hospital, Moore milks the no-cost system for all the humor it's worth as he desperately searches the facility for any sign of a billing department. He finds none. Finally, he spots a cashier sign. But he is dumbfounded to learn this is where people who paid for transit to the hospital can get reimbursed for that cost.

In France, the search for pre-existing conditions has dramatically different implications than in the U.S.: Whereas American insurance companies scrutinize enrollment forms for signs of a pre-existing condition that wasn't disclosed so as to deny a claim, in France it is to determine potentially better or even preventive treatment.

</snip>


I guess there are a lot of health care services you can add once you eliminate the 25%-30% that private insurers skim off the top in overhead & profit.

intercst
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<<In France, the search for pre-existing conditions has dramatically different implications than in the U.S.: Whereas American insurance companies scrutinize enrollment forms for signs of a pre-existing condition that wasn't disclosed so as to deny a claim, in France it is to determine potentially better or even preventive treatment.
>>


I prefer to rely on doctors to identify health problems, rather than insurance companies.



Seattle Pioneer
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"I prefer to rely on doctors to identify health problems, rather than insurance companies"

Well SP, here the insurance companies have an interesting form of "identification" after the doctor has noted a problem, that ends up with "No, as far as we are concerned, you cannot have that problem. We won't pay for it."

Because they do indeed "identify" their version of a health problem, I have heard of doctors here CHANGING the REAL diagnosis on paperwork to placate/try to fool/ the patient's insurance company.

In addition, in other countries Big Pharma does not have huge advertizing campaigns to "educate the public" so that they will ask for specific, (aka expensive,) drugs.

We may have the best research and outstanding doctors, because we, as a country, have the most money.

But IMHO, we have a lousy delivery system for the general public.

Big Momma.



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<<Well SP, here the insurance companies have an interesting form of "identification" after the doctor has noted a problem, that ends up with "No, as far as we are concerned, you cannot have that problem. We won't pay for it.">>



Never heard of that one. Of course, I suppose you think that similar abuses would never occur under a single payer system? Think Walter Reed Medical Center.


<<In addition, in other countries Big Pharma does not have huge advertizing campaigns to "educate the public" so that they will ask for specific, (aka expensive,) drugs.>>


Yes, and investment in new drug research has pretty much fallen off the charts in Europe in recent years, to say nothing of other countries.

If we wind up with a single payer system, that will probably happen here as well, and a century of drmatic improvements in medical technology and drugs will probably occur ----dooming the whole world to a stagnant drug and medical technology.


<<But IMHO, we have a lousy delivery system for the general public.
>>



People who are earning their own health insurance typically have very good care indeed. For those who are expecting someone else to pay for their medical care, the result may be problematic.


Personally I favor a system where you get what you earn and pay for.



Seattle Pioneer




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Never heard of that one. Of course, I suppose you think that similar abuses would never occur under a single payer system? Think Walter Reed Medical Center.

Walter Reed is an example of a single provider system, not a single payer system.

A single payer system is like medicare where the goverment acts as the insurance agent. A single provider system is where the goverment hires the doctors and runs the hospitals like Walter Reed.

Bad nursing homes would be an example of poor treatment in a single payer enviroment.

Just a nitpick

Ford
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In a London hospital, Moore milks the no-cost system for all the humor it's worth as he desperately searches the facility for any sign of a billing department. He finds none. Finally, he spots a cashier sign. But he is dumbfounded to learn this is where people who paid for transit to the hospital can get reimbursed for that cost.

When my kid stayed in a London hospital, we found the cashier's office, no problem. It was special for foreigners! They had four different rates, depending on which ward you were on. The cashier dialed up my credit card company so I could ask for a limit raise.

Our stateside travel agent had purchased some sort of travel insurance for us. They insisted on faxing us a bunch of forms to get filled out by the hospital. The hospital didn't know what to do with them. I decided that my HMO wouldn't either, so we skipped almost all the forms and it worked out fine. Our HMO reimbursed us, no problem.

Vickifool
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Walter Reed is an example of a single provider system, not a single payer system.

A single payer system is like medicare where the goverment acts as the insurance agent. A single provider system is where the goverment hires the doctors and runs the hospitals like Walter Reed.

Bad nursing homes would be an example of poor treatment in a single payer enviroment.

Just a nitpick

Ford


The Bushies contracted out the administration of Walter Reed.
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The Bushies contracted out the administration of Walter Reed.


and WR was the special case of a 'base' in the process of closing (iirc)

... but then we had this little war that No One could have predicted

... and no money to re-open WR



=
...... ( a good example of what happens when the 'system' is run by folks who start wars for S & G and don't want anyone to notice the costs? )
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vickifool,

When my kid stayed in a London hospital, we found the cashier's office, no problem. It was special for foreigners! They had four different rates, depending on which ward you were on. The cashier dialed up my credit card company so I could ask for a limit raise.

Could you elaborate on the circumstances. It was my understanding that emergency care for anyone in the UK is free of charge. Was your kid receiving emergency care ?

Thanks,
JG
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I have heard of doctors here CHANGING the REAL diagnosis on paperwork to placate/try to fool/ the patient's insurance company.

Maybe that's the reason we got a "statement of benefits" notice from our ins co today that showed they had paid their portion of a lab bill for a pap smear test -- for my husband?

Can't wait to call our doctor's office to ask about that diagnosis code!



Jeanie
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Dear Jeanie,
I had to laugh at that one! Let us know the answer please!
Big Momma
Grinning
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Could you elaborate on the circumstances. It was my understanding that emergency care for anyone in the UK is free of charge. Was your kid receiving emergency care ?

Thanks,
JG


The three emergency room visits in a week were free. The pills they sent her home with were free because she was under 18.

However, her problem was that she had such a sore throat that she couldn't even swallow water, so pills weren't much use. When she forced something down, she immediately threw it back up, aggravating the sore throat. She has a metabolic disorder that makes dehydration life-threatening. So when they wanted to send her back to the hotel after the third emergency room visit, I prevailed upon them to keep her until she was well enough to swallow on her own. IVs are a great invention! And credit cards and HMOs aren't too bad either.

Vickifool

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And credit cards and HMOs aren't too bad either.

Vickifool



Wasn't it an HMO that denied Annie (of Annie's Angels here at TMF) treatment?

Annie died, btw.

AM
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And credit cards and HMOs aren't too bad either.

Vickifool



Wasn't it an HMO that denied Annie (of Annie's Angels here at TMF) treatment?



HMOs are odd ducks .....

some people love them; some people hate them.


... for everyone with a horror story, seems there's someone with a love story.


=
...... probably like football coaches
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HMOs are odd ducks .....

some people love them; some people hate them.


... for everyone with a horror story, seems there's someone with a love story.


My biggest retirement fear is that our HMO won't accept us when we come off of COBRA.

They aren't perfect, but they are so much less hassle than our dental insurance, that I'd hate to need regular insurance.

Vickifool
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... for everyone with a horror story, seems there's someone with a love story.


My biggest retirement fear is that our HMO won't accept us when we come off of COBRA.

They aren't perfect, but they are so much less hassle than our dental insurance, that I'd hate to need regular insurance.




.. a very reasonable fear ..especially since if they 'reject' you, it's likely 'regular' insurance will as well. otoh ... if you're close to Medicare age, they might be happy to keep you.


the HMO horror-stories i've heard aren't about hassles, they're about incompetence &/or rejection.


-j
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vicki: My biggest retirement fear is that our HMO won't accept us when we come off of COBRA.

When I retired my DW was refused by our HMO. The same HMO that made a ton of money off of her insurance for 30 years. Reason? She had a D&C to remove a cyst. It was benign, but they still wouldn't consider her until she had two "clear" pap smears a year apart. Then they refused because she takes medication for migraines. The same pills she took for 30 years. Cost about $200 a year.

I hate HMO's. Their bread is buttered on the side of not providing treatment. Better (cheaper) to let you die than to treat you. But I still have an HMO. Someone please reason with me?

cliff
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One of the worst things my huge-HMO-former employer does, is to methodically deny treatment to seriously ill people with no families, because nobody will be there to sue after the patient dies.

6
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I hate HMO's. Their bread is buttered on the side of not providing treatment. Better (cheaper) to let you die than to treat you. But I still have an HMO. Someone please reason with me?



non-HMOs have their own troubles ....


i'm sure you've heard my tales of woe ..BlueShield .. and Kaiser



=
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Has anyone a read on the AARP provider?
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non-HMOs have their own troubles ....


i'm sure you've heard my tales of woe ..BlueShield .. and Kaiser





AngelSpouse just got another letter today regarding Blue Shield "taking back" their payments -- or something. Can't remember what they called it. First they said they would pay, now they say they won't. And this is for his problem that he had a year and a half ago.

I hate this country's insurance system. It SO sucks that I'm surprised there is not a national rebellion with torches and pitchforks. It's just nothing but aggravation month after month after month after month.

AM
....tired.
....If you are not sick when you have an accident that requires doctors and hospitals, you will be deathly ill when the bills (that are supposed to be paid by insurance) start rolling in...month after month after month after month after month after month after month....

Bah!
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Has anyone a read on the AARP provider?



for Medicare ... so far so good. (5 months)



-j
...... a bit of bureaucratic hoo-ha trying to sign up, but eventually straightened out.
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...... a bit of bureaucratic hoo-ha trying to sign up, but eventually straightened out.
--------------
So AARP is open for health care business now?
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<<I hate HMO's. Their bread is buttered on the side of not providing treatment. Better (cheaper) to let you die than to treat you. But I still have an HMO. Someone please reason with me?

cliff
>>


No different than single payer health care systems. The British Health Service has been famous for letting elderly neumonia patients die off with little in the way of treatment.




Seattle Pioneer
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...... a bit of bureaucratic hoo-ha trying to sign up, but eventually straightened out.
--------------
So AARP is open for health care business now?



Medicare .... Supplement & Rx

other than that --i don't know.


=
..... of course it's not AARP per se ...it's some company partnered with (?) AARP
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Medicare .... Supplement & Rx

other than that --i don't know.
=
..... of course it's not AARP per se ...it's some company partnered with (?) AARP
---------------

Goes without saying.

My point being that an NPR story last month stated that AARP will shortly finally be offering a group health insurance policy.

Being self employed, & currently uninsured, this will be my best option to date.
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The British Health Service has been famous for letting elderly neumonia patients die off with little in the way of treatment.
Seattle Pioneer

-----

Link?

(shouldn't be a problem if it's so 'famous', right?)







ten
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=
..... of course it's not AARP per se ...it's some company partnered with (?) AARP

-----

Hartford? They seem to be one of AARP's faves judging from all the crap I get in the mail from them.





ten
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My point being that an NPR story last month stated that AARP will shortly finally be offering a group health insurance policy.

Being self employed, & currently uninsured, this will be my best option to date.



could be good .... will depend on the details. ( they could be just as bad as the other options .. depending on your state )


as one-time self-employed and many times uninsured ... i wish you luck.


=j
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..... of course it's not AARP per se ...it's some company partnered with (?) AARP
-----

Hartford? They seem to be one of AARP's faves judging from all the crap I get in the mail from them.



called "United HealthCare" .... could be owned by Hartford ..


-j
....or even MetLife -- they were essentially the only viable option for me, so i can't really care.
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as one-time self-employed and many times uninsured ... i wish you luck.

=j
----------

Thanks, i'll be fine & am good to go.

Proper diet since college, regular exercise, & a generous genetic code. Of course the next time I walk outside a meteorite may slam into me, but what the heck.
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